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(KGW Portland)   After years of study, scientists conclude Oregon is the worst state to retire in   (kgw.com) divider line 78
    More: Obvious, Oregon  
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5791 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 May 2013 at 3:03 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-09 12:04:57 AM  
Good, that means when I retire there, there won't be anyone in line at the early bird dinner special.
 
2013-05-09 12:25:14 AM  

RedPhoenix122: Good, that means when I retire there, there won't be anyone in line at the early bird dinner special.


Tebo's on McLoughlin, 4:00 in the afternoon, strawberry shortcake.  You didn't hear it from me, though.

Shhh.
 
2013-05-09 12:27:32 AM  
What f*cking stupid criteria.
 
2013-05-09 12:39:01 AM  
wow what an impressively horrible study and what a peculiar conclusion to draw from it. Yes. Lets all move to Tennessee.
 
2013-05-09 12:52:55 AM  

quickdraw: wow what an impressively horrible study and what a peculiar conclusion to draw from it. Yes. Lets all move to Tennessee.


I hear Tennessee has a lot of black people.
 
2013-05-09 02:14:56 AM  

ShawnDoc: quickdraw: wow what an impressively horrible study and what a peculiar conclusion to draw from it. Yes. Lets all move to Tennessee.

I hear Tennessee has a lot of black people.


That's something you can't say about Oregon. Do we get to use that as a criteria too, since "number of hospital beds" is also pretty stupid?
 
2013-05-09 03:06:31 AM  
I moved to Portland in the 90's to retire.
 
2013-05-09 03:06:56 AM  
"Average walking distance to a bar serving beer from at least 10 different craft breweries" isn't on the list, then...
 
2013-05-09 03:07:55 AM  
ah, once again, proof that scientists are never ever ever ever wrong and should be trusted above any religion.
 
2013-05-09 03:08:42 AM  
I would rather retire in a place with a low average temperature like Oregon and Alaska then a place with a high temperature like Florida or Arizona.
 
2013-05-09 03:08:58 AM  
except for I see no science in the article, subby has ruined my knee jerk snark.
 
2013-05-09 03:11:34 AM  
So Oregon is a bad state to retire in, because it has an average temperature of 48 degrees. But apparently the BEST place to retire is South Dakota. WTF??? Have any idea what most of the year is like there?

What a stupid study. Oregon's temp may be 48, but it's fairly stable and mild. I wouldn't want to get stuck anywhere near South Dakota from November through April.
 
2013-05-09 03:13:19 AM  

I sound fat: ah, once again, proof that scientists are never ever ever ever wrong and should be trusted above any religion.


No, it's just a reminder that there is good science and bad science, and it's valuable to know how to discern between the two.
 
2013-05-09 03:13:52 AM  
Nonsense.  It's where young people go to retire.
i39.tinypic.com
 
2013-05-09 03:15:35 AM  
This study failed to include the average driving distance to the nearest farmer's market.
 
2013-05-09 03:15:36 AM  
No, see Oregon is bad to retire in if your old.  The city of Portland is great to retire in if your 30.

/walked to Fire on the Mountain on E. Burnside tonight from PSU area
//hipster overload out there for some reason
 
2013-05-09 03:16:45 AM  

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: No, see Oregon is bad to retire in if your old.  The city of Portland is great to retire in if your 30.

/walked to Fire on the Mountain on E. Burnside tonight from PSU area
//hipster overload out there for some reason


Your = you're

I am dumb
 
2013-05-09 03:17:20 AM  

dbrunker: Nonsense.  It's where young people go to retire.
[i39.tinypic.com image 578x326]


Dumb farks are driving up the rents in downtown so they can all live 4 to a room, and pan handle while looking for that dream Barista job.
 
2013-05-09 03:17:23 AM  
i4.ytimg.com

What a Tennessee retiree might look like.
 
2013-05-09 03:18:10 AM  

berylman: This study failed to include the average drive in  driving distance to the nearest farmer's market.

FTFY

 
2013-05-09 03:18:28 AM  

puffy999: What f*cking stupid criteria.


This.  Apparently only weather and taxes matter.  Any notions of cultural engagement can suck it.
 
2013-05-09 03:20:39 AM  
Gist of results: hell preferable to purgatory

/I am unconvinced
 
2013-05-09 03:29:53 AM  
Dear retirees.
Ignore this study
Please do not move to Tennessee.
Thank you
 
2013-05-09 03:33:26 AM  

detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: detroitdoesntsuckthatbad: No, see Oregon is bad to retire in if your old.  The city of Portland is great to retire in if your 30.

/walked to Fire on the Mountain on E. Burnside tonight from PSU area
//hipster overload out there for some reason

Your = you're

I am dumb


We;re all dumb.  And drunk.  And serial killers.  Stay away.

No vacancy.

/amidoingitright?
 
2013-05-09 03:40:06 AM  
Best place to retire if you have a terminal illness, though. Go Death with Dignity Act!

Seriously, crap criteria.
 
2013-05-09 03:41:19 AM  
Attention retirees:

Sun City, Sun City West, Sun City Grand and Young Town does not exist. Please go to either Tennessee or Oregon. BTW there's no one here by the name of Sheriff Joe Apiro. It's the desert heat talking. Move along move along.
 
2013-05-09 03:41:43 AM  

mr lawson: Dear retirees.
Ignore this study
Please do not move to Tennessee.
Thank you


Ditto for Oregon
/Thank you
 
2013-05-09 03:43:43 AM  

RedPhoenix122: Good, that means when I retire there, there won't be anyone in line at the early bird dinner special.


Cat food?
 
2013-05-09 03:44:40 AM  

RancidSorbet: Best place to retire if you have a terminal illness, though. Go Death with Dignity Act!


Every retirement plan should have an exit strategy.
 
2013-05-09 03:46:13 AM  
Yep. Washington sucks. We only placed 2 slots higher than that piece of shiat state Oregon.

Stay away. Seriously. Stay away. It sucks here. I can't wait to move to Tennessee! I heard it's great there.

Consider Tennessee.
 
2013-05-09 04:00:25 AM  

Corn_Fed: So Oregon is a bad state to retire in, because it has an average temperature of 48 degrees. But apparently the BEST place to retire is South Dakota. WTF??? Have any idea what most of the year is like there?

What a stupid study. Oregon's temp may be 48, but it's fairly stable and mild. I wouldn't want to get stuck anywhere near South Dakota from November through April.


bears.jpg
bears.jpg
bears.jpg

Though SD is the  3rd best place according to the list.  And North Dakota is 10th.  I'm pretty sure South Dakota's motto is, "If you think it's cold here, go north a ways."  I've been to SD in late spring and early summer two or three times.  It's gorgeous.  Beautiful.  Amazing.  But winter is brutal.  Also beautiful but I wouldn't want to live in a place where it's just assumed that I'll be snowed in for days at a time several times every winter.  I'd rather live someplace where even the worst weather won't phase my front wheel drive car more than once or twice a year.  That knocks out pretty much everything north of 37-38 degrees.
 
2013-05-09 04:01:14 AM  
What would happen is we were to unskew these results?

Forget it. Keep the retires away.
 
2013-05-09 04:08:17 AM  
Way way back in the 70's, my Dad decided to "retire" and move north to Oregon.  He sold his Berkeley gas station and upper middle class house for something near $500K total, drove north for 10 hours and found a beautiful estate in Roseburg, right on the Umpqua River - ok, sometimes - in the Umpqua River, for under $50K.  He turned his garage into a fixit shop, and taught auto shop at the college.  That change to rural life was a godsend to him, and he lived there serenely until he died in 2005.

Every time I came home I'd go up there to visit, sometimes you'd see deer up on the hill as you looked out from the front of the house.  At night you'd hear nature, not cars and trucks.  Kids would use the river for swimming and innertube rides.  Adults would go boating and fishing. You could sit in the backyard and watch the hummingbirds feed, or watch Dad club the beavers.

There was a story - probably a joke - that southern Oregonians used to stand at the Calif/Ore border and throw rocks at the cars with California plates in an effort to keep them away.  I know that housing costs certainly have gone up.  My Dad's house sold for over $300K.

Portland, on the other hand, is still a city, and anybody who considers Portland as any part of Oregon is an idjit.  Nobody in their right mind moves to a city to retire.  Oregon, as a state, is a beautiful retirement area.  True, it may not have many golf courses, though my Dad was happy with the local course he played on, but it still has clean air, snow-capped mountains, wildlife, and a serenity that just doesn't occur in the city.

Ok - so it also has lumber mills.  And, I saw black people in Portland.
 
2013-05-09 04:15:41 AM  

quickdraw: wow what an impressively horrible study and what a peculiar conclusion to draw from it. Yes. Lets all move to Tennessee.


If you look at the actual study summary, it says that 170 is the worst score and 81 is the best.  They gave Tennessee a score of 71, and Oregon a score of 178.  Someone has no farking clue how math works.

The "overall rank" reflects the composite rank for each state after combining all the factors, with 170 as the worst score and 81 as the best.
 
2013-05-09 04:17:13 AM  
FTFA: The research was compiled by banking website Bankrate.com. Rather than including the number of beaches, lakes or golf courses, this list considered cost of living, crime rates, taxes, medical care and average annual temperatures.

Cost of living -- Well, duh! If you can't afford to live there, then what's the point? Unless you have a specific attachment to a high-cost area, it makes sense to retire where your retirement income will afford you a better quality of life.

Crime rates -- Why would someone willingly retire in a place with a high crime rate?

Taxes -- Why should you retire in a place with high taxes?

Medical care -- Again... duh! As you get older, the quality and availability of medical care become more important to you.

Average annual temperatures -- Arthritis and sensitivity to cold are a bi*tch as you get older. Also, what good are lakes, beaches, and golf courses if it's too damned cold and/or nasty to use them?

If you can afford to snowbird, do it. Florida and Arizona are both good for winter (Florida winter is better than Arizona winter IMO)... Just understand that the full-time natives in both states are crazy, and prepare yourself accordingly. (If you're crazy, then you'll fit right in with no problem.)

Florida is better than Arizona, tax-wise. Florida has no state income tax. Arizona has a high income tax. Both states have high sales tax. IMO, Arizona taxes you to death and doesn't deliver a whole lot for it. In Florida, it's easier to see your tax money being spent in the public's interest.

Notice that I'm not talking about Oregon. I did have to laugh at TFA for mentioning that DC was included in this list and Oregon still was rated at the bottom. The DC area is insanely expensive, the weather can seriously suck in the coldest and hottest months, and getting around can be a royal pain in the ass for retired seniors (as well as everybody else).

I strongly disagree with rating Tennessee at the top. I read an article that said Tennessee has "Florida-like weather"... Not quite. In fact, not even close. Yes, it can get hot and humid during the summer, but because of the land-locked and hilly terrain the air currents don't move the same way they do in Florida. This makes Tennessee's hot summers much more stifling in some areas. The difference in latitude makes a HUGE difference in the intensity of the sunlight and the general "feel" of the weather. And winters in Tennessee can be horrendously cold, with some treacherous driving conditions. Florida's weather, especially in the southwest part of the state, is much more stable temperature-wise year-round. For old retired folks who need warmth and sunshine, SWFL really is the best place to live. As for the cost of living in Tennessee, it really depends on where you are. You can live cheaper there if you're willing to go small-town or rural, but be warned -- Tennessee has already been wooing retirees from more expensive areas up north for years, and the price of homes for retirees has skyrocketed in some areas. Even though the retirees feel like they're getting a good deal, they're actually being screwed. Builders are building northern-style mini-mansions on larger lots and charging buttloads of money for them. These houses are generally way overpriced and out of character for the areas they're being built in, and when the economy softens, they become impossible to sell.

But hey... If you want to retire in Tennessee, that's your choice. It's just not as good a deal as they're pitching it to be. Do your homework before making that kind of a decision.

/have lived in all these places
//except Oregon
///why would I live in Oregon?
////DC's better
 
2013-05-09 04:18:44 AM  

Corn_Fed: What a stupid study. Oregon's temp may be 48, but it's fairly stable and mild. I wouldn't want to get stuck anywhere near South Dakota from November through April.


Last and well only time I was in South Dakota it was about 105 with significant humidity.  Bonus GF's dad talking about the winter the barn lifted off Wizard of OZ style and landed in a heap on the neighbors property.

I think I read somewhere that Oakland CA has some of the best weather in the country.  Never gets very hot, never very cold. Doesn't rain a farkton or snow ever.
 
2013-05-09 04:24:44 AM  
Florida has a south west part? Isn't that the Gulf of Mexico?
 
2013-05-09 04:26:17 AM  

gibbon1: I think I read somewhere that Oakland CA has some of the best weather in the country.  Never gets very hot, never very cold. Doesn't rain a farkton or snow ever.


Yeah, but too bad about the people who live there. It's a dangerous city.

You know... Raiders fans.
 
2013-05-09 04:35:39 AM  

mr lawson: Dear retirees.
Ignore this study
Please do not move to Tennessee.
Thank you


THIS we dont want to be Florida north.

Although I can understand why we would be high on the list, some of the lowest cost of living and taxes and if you are close to any of the big 4 cities we have pretty good hositals.
 
2013-05-09 04:50:57 AM  

ShawnDoc: quickdraw: wow what an impressively horrible study and what a peculiar conclusion to draw from it. Yes. Lets all move to Tennessee.

I hear Tennessee has a lot of black people.


Memphis does. I know people that just got back from Iraq or Afghanistan who are like "fark that shiat" to going there
 
2013-05-09 04:51:24 AM  
They looked at the average annual temperature for the entire state of Oregon?

There's a big mountain range down the middle of the state.  The western half of the state has very mild temperatures.  In Portland, the average low temperature during January is 35.8 degrees, average high temperature daily is 47.  That's a very mild winter.  Average high temperature during July is 80.6 degrees, average low is 57.8.

Average number of days with snowfall in Portland per year is 2.5.

So, mild summers, mild winters with no snow.  You'd think that would make it good for retired people.
 
2013-05-09 04:53:57 AM  

gibbon1: I think I read somewhere that Oakland CA has some of the best weather in the country. Never gets very hot, never very cold. Doesn't rain a farkton or snow ever.


You mean San Diego. Oakland is freezing, it's up in Northern California.
 
2013-05-09 05:09:01 AM  
Better Oregon than a lot of other places around the country. I'd prefer anywhere in Hawaii except Oahu, but Oregon isn't that bad....
 
2013-05-09 05:15:49 AM  
Ha. There are a lot of things about most of Texas that I am not fond of, but my little corner of it is a pretty good place to retire. If a warm average temperature is a good thing we have THAT, I bet it is close to 80 on average, it has been there most of what people call "winter" everywhere else this year. Have to be on the very low end for hospital beds but I am fairly sure I know how to stay out of those. Taxes? Well. Not such a burden for the fairly poor which I will be or the very rich, which I won't be. Here in TexAss they make sure the really poor pay most of the taxes with the lottery. No State income tax. Crazy sales tax, but to pay that you have to have some money to buy something. I start "retiring" May 31st thanks to a reduction in force at the local University. Because I am here I can probably live pretty well on my dinky little social security check and my even dinkier teacher retirement up until the politicians decide they are doing me a favor giving me back some of the money I have paid in since I started work when I was 16.
 
2013-05-09 05:16:40 AM  

HotWingAgenda: gibbon1: I think I read somewhere that Oakland CA has some of the best weather in the country. Never gets very hot, never very cold. Doesn't rain a farkton or snow ever.

You mean San Diego. Oakland is freezing, it's up in Northern California.


Don't be dumb - if you mean 60 degrees in the winter is freezing, then I'd say you're fairly warm-blooded.  Rarely does it drop below 40, and snow is a novelty.  It snows more in L.A. than it does in Oakland or anywhere else in the Bay Area.  It also doesn't get too hot - into the 80's, sometimes higher, in the summer.  The heat doesn't bring storms and tornadoes.  We have no hurricanes.  Earthquakes, but you can't set your watch by them.  There tends to be a light, steady breeze coming off the bay, which makes humidity unnoticeable, although there are smells that I could probably live without.

So, from a purely environmental standpoint, Oakland would be a gorgeous place to live.  Except for the people.  They mostly suck.
 
2013-05-09 06:13:42 AM  
I don't think state averages are well suited for a retirement ranking.  As others have pointed out, what good is an average statewide temperature?  Since I'm not retiring in Western and Eastern Oregon simultaneously I don't really care that the statewide average is 48 degrees (by the way Eastern Oregon is mostly high desert and not what you think of when you picture Oregon).

This type of list definitely needs to be confined to city rankings.  You can be a lot more specific with climate, cost of living, amenities, health care, etc.
 
2013-05-09 06:33:38 AM  

Fark Me To Tears: FTFA: The research was compiled by banking website Bankrate.com. Rather than including the number of beaches, lakes or golf courses, this list considered cost of living, crime rates, taxes, medical care and average annual temperatures.

Cost of living -- Well, duh! If you can't afford to live there, then what's the point? Unless you have a specific attachment to a high-cost area, it makes sense to retire where your retirement income will afford you a better quality of life.

Crime rates -- Why would someone willingly retire in a place with a high crime rate?

Taxes -- Why should you retire in a place with high taxes?

Medical care -- Again... duh! As you get older, the quality and availability of medical care become more important to you.

Average annual temperatures -- Arthritis and sensitivity to cold are a bi*tch as you get older. Also, what good are lakes, beaches, and golf courses if it's too damned cold and/or nasty to use them?

If you can afford to snowbird, do it. Florida and Arizona are both good for winter (Florida winter is better than Arizona winter IMO)... Just understand that the full-time natives in both states are crazy, and prepare yourself accordingly. (If you're crazy, then you'll fit right in with no problem.)

Florida is better than Arizona, tax-wise. Florida has no state income tax. Arizona has a high income tax. Both states have high sales tax. IMO, Arizona taxes you to death and doesn't deliver a whole lot for it. In Florida, it's easier to see your tax money being spent in the public's interest.

Notice that I'm not talking about Oregon. I did have to laugh at TFA for mentioning that DC was included in this list and Oregon still was rated at the bottom. The DC area is insanely expensive, the weather can seriously suck in the coldest and hottest months, and getting around can be a royal pain in the ass for retired seniors (as well as everybody else).

I strongly disagree with rating Tennessee at the top. I read an article that said Tennessee has "Florida-like weather"... Not quite. In fact, not even close. Yes, it can get hot and humid during the summer, but because of the land-locked and hilly terrain the air currents don't move the same way they do in Florida. This makes Tennessee's hot summers much more stifling in some areas. The difference in latitude makes a HUGE difference in the intensity of the sunlight and the general "feel" of the weather. And winters in Tennessee can be horrendously cold, with some treacherous driving conditions. Florida's weather, especially in the southwest part of the state, is much more stable temperature-wise year-round. For old retired folks who need warmth and sunshine, SWFL really is the best place to live. As for the cost of living in Tennessee, it really depends on where you are. You can live cheaper there if you're willing to go small-town or rural, but be warned -- Tennessee has already been wooing retirees from more expensive areas up north for years, and the price of homes for retirees has skyrocketed in some areas. Even though the retirees feel like they're getting a good deal, they're actually being screwed. Builders are building northern-style mini-mansions on larger lots and charging buttloads of money for them. These houses are generally way overpriced and out of character for the areas they're being built in, and when the economy softens, they become impossible to sell.

But hey... If you want to retire in Tennessee, that's your choice. It's just not as good a deal as they're pitching it to be. Do your homework before making that kind of a decision.

/have lived in all these places
//except Oregon
///why would I live in Oregon?
////DC's better


Tennessee summers have nothing on Florida summers because it's ridiculously humid in Florida- humidity makes heat worse. And I've never endured a ridiculously cold winter in TN- the occasional ice storm, but never a lot of snow with any regularity. House prices are cheaper than you will find in many parts of the country, and property taxes are very low. Plus no income tax. Sales tax is high to make up for it, but the school system suffers for it (not that you'd care if you retired), and if you live next to the border of Kentucky or other states with no or lower sales tax, it's not a problem. It has some very good hospitals (Vanderbilt in Nashville), and the people actually ARE friendly (unless you act like an a$$hole know-it-all Yankee, then you might want to stay away- by this I mean don't be rude). Oh, and the state football team is the Tennessee Volunteers (the Titans are a good second- only grads like Vandy). You don't have to be religious as long as you worship football. And real southern food is delicious, and if you're already old, who cares about being healthy?

And that is your guide to living in TN. Keep in mind this changes in each state in the South, and will not work in the other SEC states.
 
2013-05-09 06:38:32 AM  

puffy999: What f*cking stupid criteria.


THIS.

"Average annual temperature"??? I'm a New England boy, I LIKE it cool.
 
2013-05-09 06:58:44 AM  
that makes sense.  i usually die of dysentery before i even get there.
 
2013-05-09 08:08:58 AM  
In other news, Oregon is the state least like Florida.
 
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