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(Phys Org2)   Clean water isn't available to a large portion of the world's population. This is a problem. Indian scientists may have a solution. Fark: for less than 3$ per year   (phys.org ) divider line
    More: Cool, Indian scientists, water purification, portable water purification, Development Goals, ambient temperature, filtration, drinking water, National Academy of Sciences  
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6762 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 May 2013 at 3:26 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-07 02:36:02 PM  
How?
 
2013-05-07 02:37:40 PM  
3 bucks until the corporations get ahold of it, and either charge outrageous prices or bury the invention to keep their profits flowing in.
 
2013-05-07 02:44:03 PM  
Wow. Cool.

2 million people each year die of diarrhea each year, mostly children? Jesus. I cannot imagine having my child diarrhea themselves to death. Ugh.
 
2013-05-07 02:54:36 PM  
This actually is really cool.
 
2013-05-07 03:05:34 PM  
Is 3$ the Indian version of $3?
 
2013-05-07 03:29:06 PM  
Well we'll never hear bout this again.
 
2013-05-07 03:29:32 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: 3 bucks until the corporations get ahold of it, and either charge outrageous prices or bury the invention to keep their profits flowing in.


What outrageous prices can they charge to the world's poorest?  What kind of profits are they supposedly getting?  Do you think that someone is out peddling Dasani to children in Mogadishu?
 
2013-05-07 03:30:05 PM  
Turns out it's a piece of paper with "Stop shiatting in the Ganges" written on it.
 
2013-05-07 03:31:26 PM  

Inigo: Turns out it's a piece of paper with "Stop shiatting in the Ganges" written on it.


I lol'd, very nice
 
2013-05-07 03:32:31 PM  

Grumpy Cat: How?


Nanoparticle treatments, essentially you get the same disinfectant properties as certain silver compounds without actually contaminating your water with the disinfectant compound.

"Indian scientists" is a bit misleading since this is a major branch of materials research that the whole world is in on, but otherwise, hey, a for reals science article about an actual important thing for once.  Sweet.
 
2013-05-07 03:33:34 PM  

meanmutton: FirstNationalBastard: 3 bucks until the corporations get ahold of it, and either charge outrageous prices or bury the invention to keep their profits flowing in.

What outrageous prices can they charge to the world's poorest?  What kind of profits are they supposedly getting?  Do you think that someone is out peddling Dasani to children in Mogadishu?


4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-05-07 03:33:55 PM  
are nanoparticles anything like nanoprobes... because seven of nine had those and I'd drink her bath water.
 
2013-05-07 03:38:23 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: 3 bucks until the corporations get ahold of it, and either charge outrageous prices or bury the invention to keep their profits flowing in.


The new Brita Silverstream® Water Purification System.  Only $79.99.
 
2013-05-07 03:47:44 PM  
The problem with this and other filtration technologies is their limited lifespan.  It is similar to putting complex water moving equipment in poor, rural areas with no technicians or parts to fix them when they break down.
 
2013-05-07 03:48:46 PM  
combine this with a plan to set up greenhouses on unused floors of skyscrapers that either pipe in natural light or use UV lighting as a means of cleaning the air...
 
2013-05-07 03:49:30 PM  

Famous Thamas: The problem with this and other filtration technologies is their limited lifespan.  It is similar to putting complex water moving equipment in poor, rural areas with no technicians or parts to fix them when they break down.


Except the opposite of that because they're cheap, super portable, and require no technicians to maintain (by swapping the $3 filter).
 
2013-05-07 03:51:22 PM  
No, the system cost is comparable to other filtration systems - the actual processing of the water comes to $3 per year. So, it has cheap filters...
 
2013-05-07 03:51:54 PM  
Our company makes the world's #1 brand of kitchen water treatment system.  It is easy for people in nations with well developed infrastructure to take access to safe drinking water for granted.  It is not safe to drink tap water (if it's even available) in many poorer countries, or even some areas of China.

The system we sell is very effective but also quite expensive.  However, our R&D department has been working on developing a very inexpensive water treatment system based on biofilms for developing nations without running water.

And we're not doing it because we'd make a lot of money.  In fact, it might even occasionally compete with our already successful system.  But access to safe drinking water is a huge problem in developing countries.
 
2013-05-07 03:55:10 PM  
Fools. We all know we will 3D print fresh water from asteroid ice. Anytime now. Soon.
 
2013-05-07 03:57:58 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Fools. We all know we will 3D print fresh water from asteroid ice. Anytime now. Soon.


Pfft, I already did it. I put on my 3D printer and hit print then *poof*, 30 minutes later out comes water.
 
2013-05-07 03:58:55 PM  
*put ice*
 
2013-05-07 04:03:20 PM  
I figured out the math and you could filter the entire Ganges river for $327.9 billion a year. Or you could like Inigo said, "Stop shiatting in the Ganges".
 
2013-05-07 04:03:33 PM  

mesia: No, the system cost is comparable to other filtration systems - the actual processing of the water comes to $3 per year. So, it has cheap filters...


Did you miss the diagram?  It's basically a bucket with some holes drilled in.  The tech is all in manufacturing the filters, which is very cheap with some basic economies of scale going on.
 
2013-05-07 04:08:18 PM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Fools. We all know we will 3D print fresh water from asteroid ice. Anytime now. Soon.


You are one of the only farkers on here with a completely defined Transfer Function.
 
2013-05-07 04:12:58 PM  
What's this, a clearly written news article with a link the research at the publishing journals website?  This seems deceptively like news.
 
2013-05-07 04:44:22 PM  

Parkanzky: Our company makes the world's #1 brand of kitchen water treatment system.  It is easy for people in nations with well developed infrastructure to take access to safe drinking water for granted.  It is not safe to drink tap water (if it's even available) in many poorer countries, or even some areas of China.

The system we sell is very effective but also quite expensive.  However, our R&D department has been working on developing a very inexpensive water treatment system based on biofilms for developing nations without running water.

And we're not doing it because we'd make a lot of money.  In fact, it might even occasionally compete with our already successful system.  But access to safe drinking water is a huge problem in developing countries.


Don't they just donate it and use it for tax write off purposes anyway? It seems like a win for them either way.
 
2013-05-07 04:44:27 PM  
For something around a billion UK pounds you could provide every living human with clean water and sanitation.  We never do.  For around $5 per unit you could air drop water purifiers that can filter out pretty much anything, work through a manual pump and well... so long as there is water in there somewhere what comes out the drinking end is fresh and clean.   We never air drop them.

The problem isn't a lack of technology, we've got technology enough to terraform the Sahara in to the lush green plains it was in ancient history. The problem is we don't want to give the technology away and they can't afford the asking price.   That's the single, solitary problem and it's why all of these schemes, cheaper and cheaper filtration systems people dream up and well... "Feed the World" is never going to happen.

They're too poor to afford it.  Nothing more, nothing less.
 
2013-05-07 04:49:01 PM  

meanmutton: What outrageous prices can they charge to the world's poorest?  What kind of profits are they supposedly getting?  Do you think that someone is out peddling Dasani to children in Mogadishu?


I'll take from that mountain range to that river. from the sky above all the way down.

You're thinking in terms of "how much to they charge the people", they don't.  It's what our government demands from their government in order to either bulk purchase the Dasani or allow Cokeacola Company to send the bottles of tap water themselves.
 
2013-05-07 04:52:28 PM  

Hollie Maea: Quantum Apostrophe: Fools. We all know we will 3D print fresh water from asteroid ice. Anytime now. Soon.

You are one of the only farkers on here with a completely defined Transfer Function.


He's definitely stuck in a feedback loop of some kind
 
2013-05-07 04:54:52 PM  
Might be good to grab a bunch for post-apocalyptic situations.
 
2013-05-07 04:56:51 PM  

Vaneshi: For something around a billion UK pounds you could provide every living human with clean water and sanitation.  We never do.  For around $5 per unit you could air drop water purifiers that can filter out pretty much anything, work through a manual pump and well... so long as there is water in there somewhere what comes out the drinking end is fresh and clean.   We never air drop them.

The problem isn't a lack of technology, we've got technology enough to terraform the Sahara in to the lush green plains it was in ancient history. The problem is we don't want to give the technology away and they can't afford the asking price.   That's the single, solitary problem and it's why all of these schemes, cheaper and cheaper filtration systems people dream up and well... "Feed the World" is never going to happen.

They're too poor to afford it.  Nothing more, nothing less.


And I quote:

Most official development assistance (ODA) came from the 23 members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC), or about $120 billion in 2009.[6] In 2007 a further $11.8 billion came from the European Commission while all non-DAC countries gave $5.56 billion.[7]


$120 billion in 2009. Since the British pound isn't 120x the US$ I'll go and call bullshiat on your idea that "we" don't want to pay. The people who are on the receiving end squander the money, plain and simple. There aren't grand infrastructure projects, there isn't a clean water project, there is even hardly a "let's feed everyone" project in the receiving countries because the politics of those places go like this: "I got mine, screw the rest." Until something is done about rampant idiocy (African farmers buying a big truck with the aid money to get respect instead of actually buying equipment) and corruption things will remain like they are. Not because the rest of the world doesn't care but because certain people in those countries keep farking things up.
 
2013-05-07 04:57:39 PM  
Unbelievable... quality policework there, Lou.
 
2013-05-07 04:59:51 PM  
The result is an extremely inexpensive portable water purification device-the system cost is comparable to other portable filtration systems, but the processing itself comes to less than $3 per year.

Except the impoverished do not often have the additional money to cover the upfront cost. This is an issue with many efficient devices which would increase standard of living, reduce long-term costs, and reduce impact on the environment is upfront cost.
 
2013-05-07 05:34:04 PM  
For $3 per year we can save a family of four. 2 million lives per year. That's $1.5 mil annually.
The same lives that will end up costing billions in aid because they live in their own shiat.
 
2013-05-07 05:34:39 PM  

Raw_fishFood: Might be good to grab a bunch for post-apocalyptic situations my city tap water.


FTFM
 
2013-05-07 05:39:40 PM  

FirstNationalBastard: 3 bucks until the corporations get ahold of it, and either charge outrageous prices or bury the invention to keep their profits flowing in.


Sounds like the kind of thing Bill and Melinda could make happen, corporations be damned.
 
2013-05-07 05:51:58 PM  
http://aattp.org/nestle-ceo-water-not-a-right-should-be-given-a-market -value-and-privatized-video/">http://aattp.org/nestle-ceo-water-not-a -right-should-be-given-a-market -value-and-privatized-video/
 
2013-05-07 05:52:05 PM  

akede: Parkanzky: Our company makes the world's #1 brand of kitchen water treatment system.  It is easy for people in nations with well developed infrastructure to take access to safe drinking water for granted.  It is not safe to drink tap water (if it's even available) in many poorer countries, or even some areas of China.

The system we sell is very effective but also quite expensive.  However, our R&D department has been working on developing a very inexpensive water treatment system based on biofilms for developing nations without running water.

And we're not doing it because we'd make a lot of money.  In fact, it might even occasionally compete with our already successful system.  But access to safe drinking water is a huge problem in developing countries.

Don't they just donate it and use it for tax write off purposes anyway? It seems like a win for them either way.


Tax write offs don't work like that. Sure, they save money in taxes, but it's less than the money they had to spend for the write off.
 
2013-05-07 05:56:44 PM  

bindlestiff2600: http://aattp.org/nestle-ceo-water-not-a-right-should-be-given-a-marke t -value-and-privatized-video/">http://aattp.org/nestle-ceo-water-not-a -right-should-be-given-a-market -value-and-privatized-video/


I'll side with the Gates Foundation, even though privatizing water has been an IMF wet dream for decades.
 
2013-05-07 05:58:06 PM  
FirstNationalBastard


3 bucks until the corporations get ahold of it, and either charge outrageous prices or bury the invention to keep their profits flowing in.

The judges regret they can only give you a 2.5 score. You blamed big biz., but failed to include the Tea Party, NRA and republicans. Try again next thread.
 
2013-05-07 05:58:54 PM  
I could scoop out a wet runny cup of sh*t from a campground latrine and it would still be more sanitary compared to the water in India.
 
2013-05-07 05:59:18 PM  
Nestle will never let this happen
 
2013-05-07 06:03:17 PM  

AKA Joker: Inigo: Turns out it's a piece of paper with "Stop shiatting in the Ganges" written on it.

I lol'd, very nice


www.humorlinks.com
 
2013-05-07 06:08:05 PM  

Jim_Callahan: Grumpy Cat: How?

Nanoparticle treatments, essentially you get the same disinfectant properties as certain silver compounds without actually contaminating your water with the disinfectant compound.

"Indian scientists" is a bit misleading since this is a major branch of materials research that the whole world is in on, but otherwise, hey, a for reals science article about an actual important thing for once.  Sweet.


There was also an announcement in the past month (or so) about a very cheap filtration system using graphene nano-technology. It's made into a filter with pores so small that contaminants can't make it through - like at the amoeba level.

Science and technology can sure be awesome.
 
2013-05-07 06:11:38 PM  

Vangor: Except the impoverished do not often have the additional money to cover the upfront cost. This is an issue with many efficient devices which would increase standard of living, reduce long-term costs, and reduce impact on the environment is upfront cost.


I'm willing to subsidize it as a first-worlder.

I'm paying about $100/year to replace the charcoal filters in my refrigerator's water dispensing system.  Surely I can afford $103/year to share potable water with a destitute family on the other side of the world.

Fast forward to 20 years later, when the kids in that family are grown up and the company I work for outsources my job to them.
 
2013-05-07 06:16:58 PM  

Rev.K: Wow. Cool.

2 million people each year die of diarrhea each year, mostly children? Jesus. I cannot imagine having my child diarrhea themselves to death. Ugh.


Google Rotavirus

When my son was 2 yo, we spent a week in a pediatric ICU while they kept him hydrated.   Without access to a modern hospital, he would have died.
 
2013-05-07 06:20:10 PM  

Grumpy Cat: How?


Please tell me I'm no the only one that saw what you did there.
 
2013-05-07 06:27:17 PM  

cmunic8r99: Grumpy Cat: How?

Please tell me I'm no the only one that saw what you did there.


Loz im geyn!

failedmessiah.typepad.com
 
2013-05-07 06:29:17 PM  

Vaneshi: For something around a billion UK pounds you could provide every living human with clean water and sanitation.


Nope.  Factually incorrect.

For around $5 per unit you could air drop water purifiers that can filter out pretty much anything, work through a manual pump and well... so long as there is water in there somewhere what comes out the drinking end is fresh and clean.

Water purification does not work that way.  You really need to invest in like a 20$ remedial chemistry class or something.

The problem isn't a lack of technology, we've got technology enough to terraform the Sahara in to the lush green plains it was in ancient history.

Nope.  Quite literally technologically impossible currently.

The problem is we don't want to give the technology away and they can't afford the asking price.

That and the price is about ten to fifteen orders of magnitude more expensive than your failed primary education has led you to believe.  Home-schooled?
 
2013-05-07 06:38:50 PM  

weiserfireman: Google Rotavirus


WORST.

GOOGLE PRODUCT.

EVER.
 
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