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(Deadspin)   Here are the salaries of every MLS player. Kick these numbers around for while   (deadspin.com) divider line 28
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2519 clicks; posted to Sports » on 07 May 2013 at 8:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-07 04:46:06 AM
is this the same as MLS listings for houses??
 
2013-05-07 08:30:12 AM
LeToux needs to be making a lot more.
 
2013-05-07 08:38:56 AM
Huh... the backups make less than a lot of high school teachers.
 
2013-05-07 08:42:04 AM

SilentStrider: LeToux needs to be making a lot more.


notsureifserious.jpg
 
2013-05-07 09:02:43 AM
Crazy, the leagues entire wage bill is lower than most top 4 EPL sides. Now that is value for your dollar.
 
2013-05-07 09:30:31 AM
NY Henry Thierry F $3,750,000.00 $4,350,000.00
NY Domingues Rafhael F $35,125.00 $35,125.00

Ouch.
 
2013-05-07 09:41:37 AM

Motogp69: Crazy, the leagues entire wage bill is lower than most top 4 EPL sides. Now that is value for your dollar.


I was just thinking the same thing. They break it down by weekly salaries, but still--Thierry Henry is on about $84,000 US per week,
(approx  £53,842),  while Robin Van Persie is being paid£200,000 per week (approx $310,740 US, or $1.62M per year).Eden Hazard makes $1.49M per year, Wayne Rooney makes $1.45M, as do Carlos Tevez and Yaya Toure. Fernando Torres and John Terry are both at $1.41M per year.

Pretty sure that players playing for Barcelona, Real Madrid, Juventus, and Paris St. Germain would all be above the line on their average starter's salary, too.
 
2013-05-07 10:05:01 AM
Um, Langston, check your math again, you're seriously undervaluing EPL guys.

RvP made about 12 million GBP in 2012, and Fernando Torres 9.1 million. Yaya Toure made $15 million.

As for Rooney... http://www.forbes.com/pictures/mli45igdi/37-wayne-rooney/
 
2013-05-07 10:11:43 AM

Incorrigible Astronaut: Huh... the backups make less than a lot of high school teachers.


But work even fewer months in a given year.
 
2013-05-07 11:34:52 AM
Yeah, this is the problem with the MLS in a nutshell. They can't only get better to a certain point, but the salary cap in MLS is really limtiing. I'm curious how it compares with some of the mid level leagues around the world. I remember hearing that Icelandic leagues (Sweden, Norway) end up getting a lot of American imports because the pay is better. I believe the skill level is similar. When you consider the amount of professional soccer available on TV now, it's tough to watch teams that can't really bring in top talent for very long. I suppose it's like watching the Royals or Pirates (but really it's more like watching a AA team)
 
2013-05-07 12:01:47 PM

Theaetetus: NY Henry Thierry F $3,750,000.00 $4,350,000.00
NY Domingues Rafhael F $35,125.00 $35,125.00

Ouch.


Yeah; I read the line "from the highest (Thierry Henry, making $4.35 million) to the lowest (a whole mess of guys making the league-minimum $35,125)" and I was wondering if I need to be as outraged as fark was in the CEO thread last week.
 
2013-05-07 12:27:45 PM

JohnHall: Yeah, this is the problem with the MLS in a nutshell. They can't only get better to a certain point, but the salary cap in MLS is really limtiing. I'm curious how it compares with some of the mid level leagues around the world. I remember hearing that Icelandic leagues (Sweden, Norway) end up getting a lot of American imports because the pay is better. I believe the skill level is similar. When you consider the amount of professional soccer available on TV now, it's tough to watch teams that can't really bring in top talent for very long. I suppose it's like watching the Royals or Pirates (but really it's more like watching a AA team)


Average salary in the UK's Football League Championship (one level below the Premier League, like AAA baseball in the US) is  £4,059 a week (£211,068 a year).  So, yeah, you're pretty spot on that pay in the MLS sucks.

http://soccerlens.com/finance-in-english-football-wage-disparities-b et ween-the-divisions/92692/
 
2013-05-07 12:30:15 PM
As a Galaxy fan since the beginning, all you can hope for is for the Euro leagues to implode. If you had told me the Old Firm was dead b/c Rangers went bankrupt, I wouldn't believe you. But aside from a handful of teams, nobody is safe. And some of those "safe" teams are one oil crisis/uprising away from the gutter, as well. MLS is like the rodents when the asteroid came to kill off the dinosaurs. These big, lumbering monstrosities can't adapt if things go wrong. MLS (aside from Chivas) generally does things slow and steady. That said, they need to bump up the pay at the bottom end. These guys aren't going to get much better as part-time players. And you need the bottom to get better, the baseline to rise (a rising tide, as it were). We can't depend on one-off prodigies, let alone a whole team of them. You need to build it up.
 
2013-05-07 12:55:16 PM
It's good to know I make more money than many of the players on the Union.  If I did my job as poorly as they play soccer, I would get fired.

(mls sucks)
 
2013-05-07 12:55:40 PM

JohnHall: Yeah, this is the problem with the MLS in a nutshell. They can't only get better to a certain point, but the salary cap in MLS is really limtiing. I'm curious how it compares with some of the mid level leagues around the world. I remember hearing that Icelandic leagues (Sweden, Norway) end up getting a lot of American imports because the pay is better. I believe the skill level is similar. When you consider the amount of professional soccer available on TV now, it's tough to watch teams that can't really bring in top talent for very long. I suppose it's like watching the Royals or Pirates (but really it's more like watching a AA team)


It's part of what's kept MLS solvent this whole time. There are no Donald Trumps coming along and single-handedly driving payroll through the roof before the league can handle it. Though getting the back end of the salary range to the point where nobody on the roster has to have real, legitimate worries about what they're going to do in the offseason and if they maybe need to take a second job... eliminating that concern should be on the priority list.

I maintain that there is a level of quality MLS simply won't ever be able to access for the sole reason that the United States is not part of Europe and therefore has no access to the UEFA Champions League. But on a player-by-player basis, many will simply chase every last dollar. There's no way MLS is going to offer $20-million-a-year salaries any time soon, but the bigger the bump, the bigger the names. (Though let's be clear here: homegrown talent is still the biggest goal. The more Landon Donovans you can convince to stay put, the fewer Thierry Henrys you have to go import.)
 
2013-05-07 01:23:54 PM
The Crew signed a guy as a discovery player for 230k who is like 4th on the depth chart at central midfield. Guys seen like 10 minutes of MLS action and he's making more than their stud goalkeeper and right back combined by like 100k. Total waste of money.

/someone please fire Robert
 
2013-05-07 01:37:25 PM

Swoop1809: The Crew signed a guy as a discovery player for 230k who is like 4th on the depth chart at central midfield. Guys seen like 10 minutes of MLS action and he's making more than their stud goalkeeper and right back combined by like 100k. Total waste of money.

/someone please fire Robert


Goalies across the board are just way underpaid. If you have salary cap money to burn, your value's right there. Especially in the US. You have world-class keepers in your backyard and you don't have to pay all that much to keep one from bolting to Europe.
 
2013-05-07 01:54:35 PM

JohnHall: Yeah, this is the problem with the MLS in a nutshell. They can't only get better to a certain point, but the salary cap in MLS is really limtiing. I'm curious how it compares with some of the mid level leagues around the world. I remember hearing that Icelandic leagues (Sweden, Norway) end up getting a lot of American imports because the pay is better. I believe the skill level is similar. When you consider the amount of professional soccer available on TV now, it's tough to watch teams that can't really bring in top talent for very long. I suppose it's like watching the Royals or Pirates (but really it's more like watching a AA team)


The MLS salary cap will grow as revenues grow. It is only a matter of time. Seeing where MLS was a decade ago, to where it is now, it is rather amazing.
 
2013-05-07 02:04:05 PM

Gosling: JohnHall: Yeah, this is the problem with the MLS in a nutshell. They can't only get better to a certain point, but the salary cap in MLS is really limtiing. I'm curious how it compares with some of the mid level leagues around the world. I remember hearing that Icelandic leagues (Sweden, Norway) end up getting a lot of American imports because the pay is better. I believe the skill level is similar. When you consider the amount of professional soccer available on TV now, it's tough to watch teams that can't really bring in top talent for very long. I suppose it's like watching the Royals or Pirates (but really it's more like watching a AA team)

It's part of what's kept MLS solvent this whole time. There are no Donald Trumps coming along and single-handedly driving payroll through the roof before the league can handle it. Though getting the back end of the salary range to the point where nobody on the roster has to have real, legitimate worries about what they're going to do in the offseason and if they maybe need to take a second job... eliminating that concern should be on the priority list.

I maintain that there is a level of quality MLS simply won't ever be able to access for the sole reason that the United States is not part of Europe and therefore has no access to the UEFA Champions League. But on a player-by-player basis, many will simply chase every last dollar. There's no way MLS is going to offer $20-million-a-year salaries any time soon, but the bigger the bump, the bigger the names. (Though let's be clear here: homegrown talent is still the biggest goal. The more Landon Donovans you can convince to stay put, the fewer Thierry Henrys you have to go import.)


I agree it's what kept the MLS together. It's an incredibly fine line that the MLS has to balance, and I'm not sure how well they can continue to do it. The more soccer grows in popularity, the more recognition there is that the MLS is a feeder league. The MLS does have its share of loyal fans, but the television ratings are brutal (often less than 100,000 viewers), and the announced crowds are a joke (17,000+ for the Red Bulls on average is laughable). The key for the MLS is to improve their "academies". I know this is a new thing, but the more these teams can develop young players before college, the more the game improves for the 19-23 year old players. The MLS makes money when these players are sold to European teams (Altidore was about an $8M sale, Michael Bradley $2M, I think). Guys like Donovan are incredibly rare, most Americans (and really most athletes) want to compete against the highest level they can. The best Americans can find tougher competition in Europe (Dempsey, Bradley, Altidore, even Sasha Klijsten and others), there's nothing the MLS can do about that even if the caps are removed.
 
2013-05-07 02:35:20 PM
shiat. Meant McInnerny, not LeToux.
I blame lack of sleep
 
2013-05-07 04:12:11 PM

SilentStrider: LeToux needs to be making a lot more.


Not sure if serious.  Maybe 2 years ago, but he's been riding the bench a lot more.
 
2013-05-07 05:58:55 PM

JohnHall: I agree it's what kept the MLS together. It's an incredibly fine line that the MLS has to balance, and I'm not sure how well they can continue to do it. The more soccer grows in popularity, the more recognition there is that the MLS is a feeder league. The MLS does have its share of loyal fans, but the television ratings are brutal (often less than 100,000 viewers), and the announced crowds are a joke (17,000+ for the Red Bulls on average is laughable). The key for the MLS is to improve their "academies". I know this is a new thing, but the more these teams can develop young players before college, the more the game improves for the 19-23 year old players. The MLS makes money when these players are sold to European teams (Altidore was about an $8M sale, Michael Bradley $2M, I think). Guys like Donovan are incredibly rare, most Americans (and really most athletes) want to compete against the highest level they can. The best Americans can find tougher competition in Europe (Dempsey, Bradley, Altidore, even Sasha Klijsten and others), there's nothing the MLS can do about that even if the caps are removed.


There's nothing inherently wrong with not being the best soccer league on the planet. The people who demand that of MLS are being ridiculous. That simply cannot happen for any league outside of western Europe. I don't know that the academy system can be brought up to European standards either- Barca gets kids into their pipeline at age 6, for Pete's sake, and the American school system simply isn't structured to accommodate a similar pipeline here- but it'll come along, in time.

What MLS offers the global soccer community is a parity setting they can't otherwise get. Lack of promotion/relegation means there's no one club that you HAVE to sign for if you don't want to be miserable, and no club that's so utterly stacked that world-class talent has to fight just to get on as a substitute. You can plug in anywhere in the league and make an impact. You can just pick your favorite city, your favorite team, favorite crowd or stadium or coach and know that you have a semi-realistic chance at glory no matter whose colors you put on. MLS' real competition is Australia, the other relegation-less league and thus the only other league that can offer a similar incentive. MLS also has a reputation for being very, very physical and attacking (drawing from American sports culture that demands that you don't play for a tie but rather just pound the bastard in front of you), and with a lot of leagues playing less to win than to not lose, that's a draw as well for anyone that can measure up.

That's what MLS offers. You won't get huge money, but you'll get a wide-open league and you'll get as much of a physical contest as you want. If that sounds like fun to you, come on over, there's plenty of room. We're this little out-of-the-way mosh pit. We're the second location Jack Donaghy told you never to follow a hippie to.
 
2013-05-07 08:57:11 PM
I hope Henry buys dinner for the team once in a while.
 
2013-05-07 09:37:15 PM

Gosling: JohnHall: I agree it's what kept the MLS together. It's an incredibly fine line that the MLS has to balance, and I'm not sure how well they can continue to do it. The more soccer grows in popularity, the more recognition there is that the MLS is a feeder league. The MLS does have its share of loyal fans, but the television ratings are brutal (often less than 100,000 viewers), and the announced crowds are a joke (17,000+ for the Red Bulls on average is laughable). The key for the MLS is to improve their "academies". I know this is a new thing, but the more these teams can develop young players before college, the more the game improves for the 19-23 year old players. The MLS makes money when these players are sold to European teams (Altidore was about an $8M sale, Michael Bradley $2M, I think). Guys like Donovan are incredibly rare, most Americans (and really most athletes) want to compete against the highest level they can. The best Americans can find tougher competition in Europe (Dempsey, Bradley, Altidore, even Sasha Klijsten and others), there's nothing the MLS can do about that even if the caps are removed.

There's nothing inherently wrong with not being the best soccer league on the planet. The people who demand that of MLS are being ridiculous. That simply cannot happen for any league outside of western Europe. I don't know that the academy system can be brought up to European standards either- Barca gets kids into their pipeline at age 6, for Pete's sake, and the American school system simply isn't structured to accommodate a similar pipeline here- but it'll come along, in time.

What MLS offers the global soccer community is a parity setting they can't otherwise get. Lack of promotion/relegation means there's no one club that you HAVE to sign for if you don't want to be miserable, and no club that's so utterly stacked that world-class talent has to fight just to get on as a substitute. You can plug in anywhere in the league and make an impact. You can just ...


To be honest... the fan atmospheres alone make the MLS better to me. No riots, no glassing, no racial slurs, stadium deck collapses, or other displays that make you lose your faith in humanity. American and Canadian soccer is the reasonable cousin of the Euro system. It doesn't snort coke with Charlie Sheen or bang $10,000/night prostitutes on a regular basis, but it doesn't get caught with a dead hooker body either.

That being said, I like the salaries the way they are. They keep the players from turning into T.O. or Chad Johnson.
 
2013-05-07 11:09:47 PM

Marine1: To be honest... the fan atmospheres alone make the MLS better to me. No riots, no glassing, no racial slurs, stadium deck collapses, or other displays that make you lose your faith in humanity. American and Canadian soccer is the reasonable cousin of the Euro system. It doesn't snort coke with Charlie Sheen or bang $10,000/night prostitutes on a regular basis, but it doesn't get caught with a dead hooker body either.


Forgot about that one, but yeah, that's huge. Knowing you can go into a rival stadium and not have to fear for your own safety is massive.
 
2013-05-07 11:17:40 PM
It is interesting to me as an MLS/soccer outsider for the most part how wide the salary discrepancies are.

I mean, comparing the low to the high... I can't think of many leagues (at least in the U.S.) where that difference is 123x ($35,125 looks to be the lowest, and $4.35 million is the highest).  Granted, that is an extreme it appears, although there is another guy making about the same, and another at $3.75m, and there are more than a few over $1 million, which is still 28x "MLS minimum wage".

Just to compare what those #'s would be in other sports if you had the same multiplier on the minimums  (28x, 123x, actual highest paid player right now).....
MLB... $480k ...... $13.4 million,   $59 million  ,  $29 million (60x)
NFL...  $420k....... $11.7 million,   $51 million ,  $19 million (45x)
NBA.... $490k........ $13.7 million,  $60 million  ,  $27 million (55x)
NHL.... $525k......... $14.7 million,  $64  million,   $8.1 million (15x)

I guess the comparison is a little unfair though, and the "presumption" would be that increases in salary across MLS over time would lift up the "Minimum wage" at a faster rate (much you'd hope) than pad the existing millionaire contracts.
 
2013-05-07 11:31:27 PM

JohnHall: and the announced crowds are a joke (17,000+ for the Red Bulls on average is laughable).


I'm sorry, I have no idea what you're talking about.

/Sounders F.C. season-ticket holder
 
2013-05-08 06:10:37 AM

dletter: It is interesting to me as an MLS/soccer outsider for the most part how wide the salary discrepancies are.

I mean, comparing the low to the high... I can't think of many leagues (at least in the U.S.) where that difference is 123x ($35,125 looks to be the lowest, and $4.35 million is the highest).  Granted, that is an extreme it appears, although there is another guy making about the same, and another at $3.75m, and there are more than a few over $1 million, which is still 28x "MLS minimum wage".

Just to compare what those #'s would be in other sports if you had the same multiplier on the minimums  (28x, 123x, actual highest paid player right now).....
MLB... $480k ...... $13.4 million,   $59 million  ,  $29 million (60x)
NFL...  $420k....... $11.7 million,   $51 million ,  $19 million (45x)
NBA.... $490k........ $13.7 million,  $60 million  ,  $27 million (55x)
NHL.... $525k......... $14.7 million,  $64  million,   $8.1 million (15x)

I guess the comparison is a little unfair though, and the "presumption" would be that increases in salary across MLS over time would lift up the "Minimum wage" at a faster rate (much you'd hope) than pad the existing millionaire contracts.


That's directly related to the "Designated Player" rule in the MLS. There is a salary cap of $3M, but every team can designate 3 players that  only count against the cap a salary of $370k (Max MLS salary), but can be paid any amount.

Obviously this wouldn't really be necessary in any other sports, as the salary cap in the MLS  is lower than the average salary in the NBA ($5.1M) and MLB ($3.3M) and close in NHL ($2.4M) and NFL ($1.1M)
 
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