If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Big Story) NewsFlash US Senate passes Internet Sales Tax Bill. Why? Because fark you, that's why   (bigstory.ap.org) divider line 573
    More: NewsFlash, Senate, internet, senate passes, sales taxes, D-Ill, United States  
•       •       •

16637 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 May 2013 at 10:06 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»


Want to get NewsFlash notifications in email?

573 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-06 10:30:21 PM

Bathia_Mapes: fusillade762: t me. No sales tax in Oregon. Neener, neener.

FTA...Under the legislation, the sales taxes would be sent to the state where the shopper lives.

So, if an Oregon online business sold items to someone living in a state that has a sales tax, the online retailer would be required to collect the sales tax and send it to that state.

And this is going to be particularly hard on small online retailers. However, businesses with less than $1 million in online sales would be exempt.


There are some states that have an origin-based tax. If you buy from a vendor in an origin-based state and you're in a destination-based state, it can get a little weird.

Here's a list, can't vouch for its accuracy on every state but I can promise you that NY and NJ are correct.
 
2013-05-06 10:30:42 PM

dopekitty74: So canadians are still free to buy online from US companies without having to pay taxes then?


Great question and possible business opportunity.

1. Move to Canada
2. Buy shiat off the interweb
3. Profit?
 
2013-05-06 10:31:01 PM
This is where the people who think everyone needs to pay their fair share figure out they'd rather not pay their fair share.
 
2013-05-06 10:31:22 PM

Bathia_Mapes: fusillade762: t me. No sales tax in Oregon. Neener, neener.

FTA...Under the legislation, the sales taxes would be sent to the state where the shopper lives.

So, if an Oregon online business sold items to someone living in a state that has a sales tax, the online retailer would be required to collect the sales tax and send it to that state.

And this is going to be particularly hard on small online retailers. However, businesses with less than $1 million in online sales would be exempt.



Yes, but if one is a resident of OR no tax will be calculated or added.  No sales tax on anything.  At all.
 
2013-05-06 10:31:48 PM
Maine requires me to pay online sales tax, whether I bought anything or not. 0.008% of my income is their default. Last year I bought a computer and some tools/books online, all for schooling. They got most of my refund back on that deal.
 
2013-05-06 10:31:56 PM
AH HA HA HA HA HA HA!
HA HA HEE HEE HA.
You stupidos keep on voting for those republicans and democrats, now.
 
2013-05-06 10:32:48 PM

clancifer: Good.


www.charlock.org
 
2013-05-06 10:32:51 PM
Wow, Jeff Flake knew the internet. Did all the yays know how the nets works?
 
2013-05-06 10:33:02 PM
Supporters say the current tax disparity is turning some traditional stores into showrooms, where shoppers pick out items they like, then buy them on the Internet to avoid sales taxes.

No, we sometimes do that because the internet almost always offers significantly better deals. If the discrepancy were $5, $10 or even $20 I'd rather pay the difference and the tax and have the item in my hands that day (the shipping savings would likely counteract the tax anyway). But when you're charging $189 for an item newegg.com sells for $99, what do you expect?

That the internet undercuts you isn't my problem. The way things exist now, the bricks and the bytes co-exist. You just want a stronger piece of the pie and are appealing to state governments' need of revenue to get it.
 
2013-05-06 10:33:36 PM

ArkAngel: Thoguh: I don't have a problem with this.  It'll cut down on really blatant tax evasion, that's it.  And smaller companies won't have to "deal with 9,000 tax codes" or anything like that.  Some vendor will see a business opportunity to run all that stuff for a small surcharge and all the small businesses will just contract through them.

Smaller companies won't have to deal with it at all. It excuses all companies with less than one million in online sales.


Just give it time. All taxes get bigger and more invasive, never the other way around.
 
2013-05-06 10:33:51 PM

feckingmorons: This will not raise your tax burden one cent. It will however create an accounting nightmare for the sellers and many smaller sellers will simply close. Those that remain open will have higher tax compliance costs and will pass those costs along to the consumer.


I pretty much agree with the rest of your post (and have tried to be diligent with paying my use tax), but this i'm not totally sure of. At least the summary I saw of the law said that if a state wants to collect sales tax from online vendors, they have to provide a free service that will specify the tax.

Now, "free" is not actually going to be "free", but I'd be surprised if the implementation costs are <i>than</I> onerous.
 
2013-05-06 10:34:31 PM
"States lost a total of $23 billion last year because they couldn't collect taxes on out-of-state sales, according to a study done for the National Conference of State Legislatures."

Yes some study. Multiplying Internet sales by ten percent. The study probably cost 8 million dollars.
 
2013-05-06 10:35:39 PM
I'm glad my senator voted against it.

/Montana
 
2013-05-06 10:36:01 PM
FROM EACH
according to his ability

TO EACH
according to his need


 /You're not selfish, are you?
 
2013-05-06 10:36:16 PM

cmunic8r99: YEAs ---69 etc...



I've never been prouder of my OK state senators.

Mainly because I normally can't wait to vote in some decent senators.

/even a broken clock...
 
2013-05-06 10:36:44 PM

evaned: Now, "free" is not actually going to be "free", but I'd be surprised if the implementation costs are <i>than</I> onerous.


Whee HTML!

Also, I meant "that onerous", not "than".
 
2013-05-06 10:36:58 PM

Stoj: "States lost a total of $23 billion last year because they couldn't collect taxes on out-of-state sales, according to a study done for the National Conference of State Legislatures."

Yes some study. Multiplying Internet sales by ten percent. The study probably cost 8 million dollars.


Brought to you by the same folks who say that the NCAA tournament costs businesses eleventybillion dollars in lost revenue due to lower worker productivity.
 
2013-05-06 10:37:01 PM

feckingmorons: You already have to pay tax on the items you buy from out of state vendors that do not collect sales tax if those items would be taxable in your state. Use tax, not sales tax is what it is called. I file my return and pay the tax quarterly as required by my state of residence, Florida.

If you live in Deleware, Montana or Oregon you have no state sales or use tax. All others should be paying their use tax as the law requires unless the vendor collects it.

This will not raise your tax burden one cent. It will however create an accounting nightmare for the sellers and many smaller sellers will simply close. Those that remain open will have higher tax compliance costs and will pass those costs along to the consumer.

If you people had paid your taxes all along like you're supposed to you wouldn't be facing this problem. Quill v. North Dakota was not litigated to save you from paying the tax you rightfully owe, it was litigated so Quill and retailers similarly situated wouldn't be required to comply with tax laws in jurisdictions in which they have no nexus.

TLDR version - you already owe these taxes, you don't pay them. Now they want businesses to collect them because you won't pay voluntarily and prices will go up. Pay your taxes deadbeats.


Sweet cupping cakes, US tax law is a mess.
 
2013-05-06 10:37:24 PM
On the one hand, I don't want to pay more.
On the other hand, it's a whole 6% more (it uses state sales tax, right?) and I should probably be paying it anyways.
 
2013-05-06 10:37:35 PM
The problem I have with this is that it does not address (at least as far as I can tell) mail order operations in states with no no sales tax. I remember years ago I used to buy old coins from an outfit in New Hampshire and never had to pay sales tax for that reason.
 
2013-05-06 10:39:01 PM
homeschooled:
Raise your hand if you answered $0 when your state tax return asked the dollar amount of out of state or online purchases that you owed taxes on

What the hell is a state income tax return?
www.united-states-flag.com

Very concerned about not getting Texas Sales Tax Exemption Certificate not honored by some web seller in East B*ttFark. What an excellent bureacracy the Senate wants to create.

Since Congress told the airports to spend wildly until they run out this summer, that's their one bill this year. They should quit while they're ahead.
 
2013-05-06 10:39:22 PM

feckingmorons: You already have to pay tax on the items you buy from out of state vendors that do not collect sales tax if those items would be taxable in your state. Use tax, not sales tax is what it is called. I file my return and pay the tax quarterly as required by my state of residence, Florida.

If you live in Deleware, Montana or Oregon you have no state sales or use tax. All others should be paying their use tax as the law requires unless the vendor collects it.

This will not raise your tax burden one cent. It will however create an accounting nightmare for the sellers and many smaller sellers will simply close. Those that remain open will have higher tax compliance costs and will pass those costs along to the consumer.

If you people had paid your taxes all along like you're supposed to you wouldn't be facing this problem. Quill v. North Dakota was not litigated to save you from paying the tax you rightfully owe, it was litigated so Quill and retailers similarly situated wouldn't be required to comply with tax laws in jurisdictions in which they have no nexus.

TLDR version - you already owe these taxes, you don't pay them. Now they want businesses to collect them because you won't pay voluntarily and prices will go up. Pay your taxes deadbeats.


I was with you until you turned it into an attack on people you know nothing about. You can make a point without being a judgemental arse.
 
2013-05-06 10:39:45 PM

TV's Vinnie: I really cannot fathom why the Amazon bigshots want this bill so bad. If it happens, their sales are gonna plummet.


Amazon's betting that quick delivery times will overcome a sales tax.  They're actually trying out same day delivery in some places, and you need warehouses near metro areas (ie. in the same state) and subject yourself to physical presence laws to do that.  Small internet companies can't compete on affordable speedy delivery.  Forcing them into the tax too puts Amazon at an advantage.
 
2013-05-06 10:40:20 PM
I'm actually OK with this. If we're going to have sales tax, it shouldn't unevenly favor internet vendors.

If we have to get revenue form someplace new, this is a decent choice. Pollution taxes would be another good choice.
 
2013-05-06 10:41:08 PM
BitwiseShift:
Very concerned about not getting Texas Sales Tax Exemption Certificate not honored by some web seller in East B*ttFark. What an excellent bureacracy the Senate wants to create.


What? Texas has a sales tax...

"The Texas state sales and use tax rate is 6.25%, but local taxing jurisdictions (cities, counties, special purpose districts, and transit authorities) may also impose sales and use tax up to 2% for a total maximum combined rate of 8.25%. " http://www.window.state.tx.us/taxinfo/sales/faq_collect.html
 
2013-05-06 10:41:17 PM
Motherfarkers!

It still doesn't solve anything. That money only goes to suits who get to decide what all of us need the most. Probably war.

F.
 
2013-05-06 10:41:23 PM
So instead of getting six games for twenty bucks in the last steam sale, I'd have to pay twenty and a buck forty? Well this is worse than the holocaust indeed.
 
2013-05-06 10:41:29 PM
I'm already taxed by Amazon so it doesn't change anything for me. I'll continue to use them for free delivery to my door, saving me gas and time.
 
2013-05-06 10:42:25 PM
Just one step closer to a national sales tax.
 
2013-05-06 10:43:10 PM

TV's Vinnie: I really cannot fathom why the Amazon bigshots want this bill so bad. If it happens, their sales are gonna plummet.


They have the infrastructure in place to put on their big girl panties and deal with it. They also have the scale of economy to keep their pricing competitive. They know many of their competitors do not have either, but generate enough sales that they will have to cope, or go under.
 
2013-05-06 10:43:14 PM
I wonder where Reid will buy his magic underwear now if he has to pay tax for the online purchases.
 
2013-05-06 10:43:15 PM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-05-06 10:43:21 PM

optikeye: Catalog sales have traditionally been excluded from the state and local sales taxes. (with the exception that the sale company has a physical store in your state). (and I should say most states as some paper catalogs add taxes to certain states).

It seems this law is redefining what a 'physical store' is..meaning a internet store that takes over the internet is subject.


The bill applies to all out-of-state sellers, not just online sellers.  In theory, it applies to international sellers but good luck with that.
 
2013-05-06 10:43:38 PM
Am I supposed to be somehow outraged by this? Because trying to calculate and pay your in-state tax for online purchases separately to your state is a real serious pain in the ass for me and many others. I guess since sales taxes are inherently regressive its a sorta bad thing, but I can't get outraged. Sorry.
 
2013-05-06 10:43:48 PM
As has been said, this isn't an additional tax. Taxes are not going up. Instead, taxes that are due will actually be collected, instead of ignored as they always have been.

But alas, it will be spun as such...
 
2013-05-06 10:43:59 PM
If I were Amazon, I'd just set up a lot of Amazon lockers on Indian reservations. No state taxes on the res, people can pick up their packages while they pick up their tax free cigarettes.
 
2013-05-06 10:44:05 PM

dickfreckle: Supporters say the current tax disparity is turning some traditional stores into showrooms, where shoppers pick out items they like, then buy them on the Internet to avoid sales taxes.

No, we sometimes do that because the internet almost always offers significantly better deals. If the discrepancy were $5, $10 or even $20 I'd rather pay the difference and the tax and have the item in my hands that day (the shipping savings would likely counteract the tax anyway). But when you're charging $189 for an item newegg.com sells for $99, what do you expect?

That the internet undercuts you isn't my problem. The way things exist now, the bricks and the bytes co-exist. You just want a stronger piece of the pie and are appealing to state governments' need of revenue to get it.


lots of "THIS"

Brick and Mortar stores are for when I want a thing NOW. interwebs are for when I can afford to wait.
Next day delivery is expensive.
 
2013-05-06 10:44:17 PM

mikemoto: The problem I have with this is that it does not address (at least as far as I can tell) mail order operations in states with no no sales tax. I remember years ago I used to buy old coins from an outfit in New Hampshire and never had to pay sales tax for that reason.


It's based on the delivery address of the sale. E.g. a New Hampshire company selling to a resident of New York has to collect and remit New York state sales tax.  A New York company selling to a New Hampshire resident doesn't collect any tax because NH doesn't have a sales tax.
 
2013-05-06 10:44:18 PM

semiotix: Vodka Zombie: basemetal: I thought you guys liked taxes....

I like society and civilization and all the wonderful trappings that come along with it.

Like roads and bridges and, yes, parks.

I'm with  Vodka Zombie on the roads and bridges, but I also like the thought of all the Fark Independents™, tax protestors, and self-made millionaires (what with their bootstraps and nobody never giving them nothin') having to pay taxes like good little citizens.

And when I say enjoy, I mean "aroused by." Yeah, that's right, let me hear you scream, you middle-class biatches. Get ready to take all eleven marginal percent right up your tight little tax hole.


Fap fap fap fap fap
 
2013-05-06 10:44:47 PM
Good. No reason online sales should be exempt anyways. Pathetic it took this long.

And .. Newsflash? .. Really? It's not like there's any other breaking news today or anything, right?
 
2013-05-06 10:45:28 PM
De welfare baby mamas be needin dat money yo, get up off it now. Black Jesus needs to punish da honkeys an feed his people.
 
2013-05-06 10:45:44 PM
It's not about "fairness", silly.

It's about State and local governments who spent like irresponsible pissed-off housewives during the Housing Bubble, ran their credit cards WAAAY over the limit, and now, post housing BUST, are faced with the ugly hangover.

For those that still think that the Dinosaur "brick and mortar" stores are treated unfairly, figure in shipping costs: Buy a widget from Vermont and have it shipped to your home in Oregon - what does that  cost?

A lot more than the sales tax, you can be sure.

/Free shipping you say?
//Free lunch, I say
///Wanna buy a bridge?
 
2013-05-06 10:45:54 PM
We live in 'Because F U times'.
 
2013-05-06 10:45:56 PM
In every Walmart thread, there are countless comments about how people should shun the evil empire and support their local mom and pop stores. Why are you all so upset about this then?
 
2013-05-06 10:46:13 PM

ArkAngel: It excuses all companies with less than one million in online sales.


Total sales, not just online sales.
 
2013-05-06 10:46:45 PM

Thoguh: I don't have a problem with this.  It'll cut down on really blatant tax evasion, that's it.  And smaller companies won't have to "deal with 9,000 tax codes" or anything like that.  Some vendor will see a business opportunity to run all that stuff for a small surcharge and all the small businesses will just contract through them.


That's because you're a pinhead. Taking your earnings which you are heavily taxed on you purchase a soft cover copy of "How Not to be a Pinhead for Dummies" and you pay tax on it. When you decide to sell the USED book you couldn't understand you will have to collect Taxes on the sale and submit them to the government. This double-dipping ain't right. And if the twatwaffle that bought the book wants to return it for refund your eBay and PayPal account won't happily show Uncle Sam IRS the tax was returned, that would be too easy. So now the tax will come directly out of your pocket and you will suffer a loss on your sale return. Ain't right.
 
2013-05-06 10:46:50 PM
Go fark yourselves Congress.
 
2013-05-06 10:47:27 PM
This has an interesting implication for tax payers in Massachusetts. Sales tax is supposed to be paid on internet purchases, but they're just claimed on the tax form when you file. Here, there is a tax that you can pay that basically says "give us this amount of money, and we'll call it even on all of those internet purchases you're not claiming." It was some small amount that I went ahead and paid, because I don't feel like being audited.

If/when this passes, though, there's no need for that tax, because sales tax will be collected on internet purchases. I just wonder if the state will realize this, and not try to bully taxpayers into paying for it twice.
 
2013-05-06 10:48:07 PM
"Supporters say the current tax disparity is turning some traditional stores into showrooms, where shoppers pick out items they like, then buy them on the Internet to avoid sales taxes."

Its not to avoid sales tax. 

(1) Prices are lower in general, anyway
(2) I dont have to carry shiat home
(3) I dont get up-selled on accessories or warranties
(4) Better/easier return policies

sales tax is roughly the 5-th best advantage of online shopping.
 
2013-05-06 10:48:29 PM

mikemoto: The problem I have with this is that it does not address (at least as far as I can tell) mail order operations in states with no no sales tax. I remember years ago I used to buy old coins from an outfit in New Hampshire and never had to pay sales tax for that reason.


So, for small stores..call them with your order. As a catalog sale--not an internet sale. Use the internet to look at the items and give a  phone call.

Al Gore put the internet sales exemption in back in the mid 90's....and it was renewed a few times. Now, that was up again it was removed.

Catalog sales from out of state catalog things have always been traditionally exempt in most states the catalog place didn't have a brick and mortar store or warehouse. Or some states that collected catalog sales taxes.
I think AZ, CA, OR, come to mind from mail order stuff.
 
Displayed 50 of 573 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report