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(Uproxx)   The first 3D-printed gun successfully fired, plans put online. This will surely end well   (uproxx.com) divider line 388
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14681 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 May 2013 at 1:28 PM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-06 11:56:10 AM
I'm no expert, but if I was to be test firing a gun for the first time, I would strap it to a block and pull the trigger remotely.

This one worked out fine, but I imagine a gun going kablewie in you hand wouldn't be fun.
 
2013-05-06 11:56:45 AM
They will free people from their souls, I am certain.
 
2013-05-06 11:58:45 AM

EvilEgg: I'm no expert, but if I was to be test firing a gun for the first time, I would strap it to a block and pull the trigger remotely.

This one worked out fine, but I imagine a gun going kablewie in you hand wouldn't be fun.


why? you could sue the manufacturer if it misfired?
 
2013-05-06 12:00:46 PM
Would those who have the means and ability to use a three dimension printer lack the means and ability to acquire an actual firearm?
 
2013-05-06 12:04:35 PM

EvilEgg: I'm no expert, but if I was to be test firing a gun for the first time, I would strap it to a block and pull the trigger remotely.


Even then- guns go through a lot of stress in their lifetimes. It can take thousands of rounds for a minor inconsistency in the metal to develop into a hairline crack and then another thousand to cause catastrophic failure.

I'm less concerned about the first or second time the gun is fired, and more concerned about the 100th or the 1000th, cuz that sucker is going to blow up eventually.
 
2013-05-06 12:06:22 PM
encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com

"Why did you shoot that duck?"
 
2013-05-06 12:07:08 PM
OMG! Obama is going to take our 3D printers away!
 
2013-05-06 12:09:01 PM

I_Am_Weasel: Would those who have the means and ability to use a three dimension printer lack the means and ability to acquire an actual firearm?


Felons
Gun prohibited countries/communities
Criminals who want something untraceable
Anyone who wants a non-metal gun

I can see this ending in one of two ways:

1) Regulatory effort shifts to ammunition rather than guns themselves
2) 3D printers are heavily regulated

It will only take one high-profile incident involving a 3D printed gun. Unlike regular firearms, there is no 3D-printed gun lobby who will move heaven and earth to protect 3D printed gun rights.
 
2013-05-06 12:11:51 PM

EvilEgg: I'm no expert, but if I was to be test firing a gun for the first time, I would strap it to a block and pull the trigger remotely.

This one worked out fine, but I imagine a gun going kablewie in you hand wouldn't be fun.


They said they tested that way a few times before they did the video.
 
2013-05-06 12:14:29 PM

EvilEgg: I'm no expert, but if I was to be test firing a gun for the first time, I would strap it to a block and pull the trigger remotely.

This one worked out fine, but I imagine a gun going kablewie in you hand wouldn't be fun.


read the article much? It says they test fired remotely first. Though honestly, from what I hear about these plastic guns, they are only useful for a few shots. I'm not sure I'd have been brave enough to shoot it in my own hands even after a few successful remote test fires.
 
2013-05-06 12:14:44 PM

I_Am_Weasel: Would those who have the means and ability to use a three dimension printer lack the means and ability to acquire an actual firearm?


Although I should say, people have been able to home-manufacture guns for a long time, and those have never really caught on... all you really need is a tube, a nail, a spring, and a very simple trigger.

The real danger of 3D printed guns is that it would allow you to make sophisticated guns very easily, semi-automatics and the like, and would allow you to make mostly-plastic guns that aren't set off by metal detectors. These are the kinds of weapons you could realistically use in robberies and holdups.

Best part: suppose you use the gun in a crime, just throw it in any household oven and melt the evidence. No fingerprints, no ballistics, no nothing. Stick a wick in it and call it a candle.
 
2013-05-06 12:14:58 PM
Plans have been on TPB for a good while now.  And I reckon this should silence all of the "it is physically impossible to build a working gun out of extruded plastic and a dimestore nail" critics.

I_Am_Weasel: Would those who have the means and ability to use a three dimension printer lack the means and ability to acquire an actual firearm?


Today?  No.  Two years from now when a 3d printer only costs $300 and the cartridges only cost $15?  Yes.

Fubini: I'm less concerned about the first or second time the gun is fired, and more concerned about the 100th or the 1000th, cuz that sucker is going to blow up eventually.


This gun isn't really designed for multiple fire.  This isn't meant to be an investment that you take out to the range and clean and teach your kids about.  This is designed for the guy whose girlfriend just cheated on him, and now he's pissed.  You only need one shot for that.

Personally, I think that all guns should be made like this.  If it only fires one shot and if there's a chance it's going to blow up in your hand, you're only going to use it when you've REALLY got to use it.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-05-06 12:17:47 PM
Not for the first time, this technology reminds me of the SF novel Murder in the Solid State and the ensuing 'net discussion. Our nanotech-savvy hero devises a way to foil government surveillance machinery. Americans thought that was a happy ending. People from other countries were horrified.

2) 3D printers are heavily regulated

Color printers and copiers can't print currency, but it's harder to block printing guns.

It may be possible to put tracers in 3D "ink" or cause the printers to embed a signature in the item. After the Oklahoma City bombing there were calls to put tracers in fertilizer to help track down people who built fertilzer bombs.
 
2013-05-06 12:18:18 PM

Fubini: It will only take one high-profile incident involving a 3D printed gun. Unlike regular firearms, there is no 3D-printed gun lobby who will move heaven and earth to protect 3D printed gun rights.


The NRA will come out openly opposing 3D printed guns.  They will find some way to justify their stance, not openly admitting that they only really exist in the first place to make money for gun manufacturers.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-05-06 12:19:09 PM
Best part: suppose you use the gun in a crime, just throw it in any household oven and melt the evidence. No fingerprints, no ballistics, no nothing. Stick a wick in it and call it a candle.

Reminds me of a story, and it might have been a simple riddle or a mystery or even SF, of the man who was shot with an ice cube. No bullet and no ballistics.
 
2013-05-06 12:20:07 PM

Fubini: I_Am_Weasel: Would those who have the means and ability to use a three dimension printer lack the means and ability to acquire an actual firearm?

Felons
Gun prohibited countries/communities
Criminals who want something untraceable
Anyone who wants a non-metal gun


Buh...I was told they were already getting guns, thereby no need to regulate them!

I was lied too!

Stupid Hannity.
 
2013-05-06 12:22:56 PM

Fubini: I_Am_Weasel: Would those who have the means and ability to use a three dimension printer lack the means and ability to acquire an actual firearm?

Felons
Gun prohibited countries/communities
Criminals who want something untraceable
Anyone who wants a non-metal gun

I can see this ending in one of two ways:

1) Regulatory effort shifts to ammunition rather than guns themselves
2) 3D printers are heavily regulated

It will only take one high-profile incident involving a 3D printed gun. Unlike regular firearms, there is no 3D-printed gun lobby who will move heaven and earth to protect 3D printed gun rights.


This is going to be like the efforts against counterfeiting.

Years ago, back before computers were so ubiquitous, the Secret Service had to worry about a relative handful of people each cranking out thousands of bills:  The knowledge and craftsmanship necessary to make a bill that was passable was a rare thing.

Then, with the advent of computers and cheap but good inkjet printers, the problem became more of thousands of people each cranking out a handful of fake bills.  It's a much harder problem to solve, and the way they did that was by modifying the money to make it harder to counterfeit.

As the sole legitimate source of money, the government could effectively do that.

They can't do the same thing for guns, however.

Nor can they do it with ammunition, either:  tens of thousands of people in the US own reloading equipment.  Hell, I've even got a single-stage press I've never used.
 
2013-05-06 12:23:06 PM
I'd have to say this is going to be like the mp3.  New technologies that allow a complete change in distribution from the traditional way.  The Weeners will be from the elders to vainly try and block the use of the technology instead of accepting it and figuring out how to work with it.  This will NOT be the only 3D printing issue that will arise.  Don't worry, somebody will soon print some other 3D item that infuriates another group of people.  Everyone will be running around hiring lawyers and lobbying Congress to block the technology instead of just accepting it as a new reality and working to channel it.

I bet you see plans for all kinds of things being posted online.  Why buy that toy for you kid when you can print it at home?  Why buy that special tool for your car when you can just print it?  As soon as the patent holders for all those things start getting mad, they'll be demanding 3D technology be blocked.

As far as this 3D gun; I don't see it as any different from existing zip guns.  I've seen plans made out of wood before that shoot a single shot.  This isn't much different.  I've yet to hear of one being used in a crime spree, mass shooting, or terrorist event.  It's just not efficient and probably isn't very accurate beyond a short range.
 
2013-05-06 12:23:16 PM

radarlove: This gun isn't really designed for multiple fire.  This isn't meant to be an investment that you take out to the range and clean and teach your kids about.  This is designed for the guy whose girlfriend just cheated on him, and now he's pissed.  You only need one shot for that.


This is clearly just the tip of the iceberg. You're not going to be able to convert this particular pistol into semi-auto very easily, but there's no reason you couldn't. You'd really just need to add a sliding breech, an extractor, a magazine and a spring. You might need a metal spring, dunno. And I guess you'd also need a recoil spring- that'd have to be metal.

You could do an AK/SKS style extractor very easily. The slide would be difficult as it'd have to be relatively robust but not too bulky or heavy. People already 3D print magazines.
 
2013-05-06 12:23:24 PM

ZAZ: Best part: suppose you use the gun in a crime, just throw it in any household oven and melt the evidence. No fingerprints, no ballistics, no nothing. Stick a wick in it and call it a candle.

Reminds me of a story, and it might have been a simple riddle or a mystery or even SF, of the man who was shot with an ice cube. No bullet and no ballistics.


I'm not sure about ice bullets, but I'm pretty sure I heard of a guy being stabbed in the chest with a sharp icicle.  It was a pretty cold hearted crime.
 
2013-05-06 12:23:56 PM
and i'm all out of bubble gum
can i print that too?
 
2013-05-06 12:25:22 PM
Because making a zip gun is so farking hard?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxHVDtD2S5U
 
2013-05-06 12:26:25 PM

dittybopper: This is going to be like the efforts against counterfeiting.


The difference is that someone can counterfeit money and no one dies. You can catch the bad guys, and take the money out of circulation. Lots of individuals will be out $100 or so bucks when they got passed bad bills, but life is life and bad things happen.

The same can't be said for this.
 
2013-05-06 12:27:58 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Fubini: It will only take one high-profile incident involving a 3D printed gun. Unlike regular firearms, there is no 3D-printed gun lobby who will move heaven and earth to protect 3D printed gun rights.

The NRA will come out openly opposing 3D printed guns.  They will find some way to justify their stance, not openly admitting that they only really exist in the first place to make money for gun manufacturers.


How many times do we have to point out to you that you are incorrect?

Saying the same thing over and over again in the face of damning evidence to the contrary is just silly.
 
2013-05-06 12:28:23 PM

sammyk: Because making a zip gun is so farking hard?


remus: As far as this 3D gun; I don't see it as any different from existing zip guns.  I've seen plans made out of wood before that shoot a single shot.  This isn't much different.  I've yet to hear of one being used in a crime spree, mass shooting, or terrorist event.  It's just not efficient and probably isn't very accurate beyond a short range.


This is just stage 1. Wait until you can 3D print fully functional semi-automatics. The only real problems I can see will be the recoil spring and magazine spring.

You could have a different gun for every robbery.
 
2013-05-06 12:30:37 PM

Fubini: dittybopper: This is going to be like the efforts against counterfeiting.

The difference is that someone can counterfeit money and no one dies. You can catch the bad guys, and take the money out of circulation. Lots of individuals will be out $100 or so bucks when they got passed bad bills, but life is life and bad things happen.

The same can't be said for this.


That's true, but that doesn't change the actual circumstances.

The same thing could be said about online piracy.  No one dies, but that doesn't mean it's not a problem, or that the solution is simple.
 
2013-05-06 12:31:25 PM
I can't wait for this potentially revolutionary technology to be destroyed because some people fear what could be made with it, and because companies don't want people to have the option to make something for themselves instead of having to purchase it.
 
2013-05-06 12:32:06 PM
Has the NRA advocated putting these printers in schools and libraries across the nation yet?

You know, for freedom.
 
2013-05-06 12:32:37 PM
So if a burglar is breaking into my house, I can print-out a gun, assemble it and fire a single shot at him - all without the cumbersome permits & storage issues?
Sweet.
 
2013-05-06 12:32:40 PM

Fubini: sammyk: Because making a zip gun is so farking hard?

remus: As far as this 3D gun; I don't see it as any different from existing zip guns.  I've seen plans made out of wood before that shoot a single shot.  This isn't much different.  I've yet to hear of one being used in a crime spree, mass shooting, or terrorist event.  It's just not efficient and probably isn't very accurate beyond a short range.

This is just stage 1. Wait until you can 3D print fully functional semi-automatics. The only real problems I can see will be the recoil spring and magazine spring.

You could have a different gun for every robbery.


I'm betting some sort of revolver will happen first, perhaps even a pepperbox style.

Much easier to build a revolver using no or very little metal than a semi-auto.
 
2013-05-06 12:34:02 PM

Aarontology: I can't wait for this potentially revolutionary technology to be destroyed because some people fear what could be made with it, and because companies don't want people to have the option to make something for themselves instead of having to purchase it.


If that should happen, it will be justified by the first case publicly, but the real reason for it will be the second case.
 
2013-05-06 12:35:35 PM

dittybopper: I'm betting some sort of revolver will happen first, perhaps even a pepperbox style.

Much easier to build a revolver using no or very little metal than a semi-auto.


I'd think that'd have to be an extremely chunky cylinder.
 
2013-05-06 12:39:21 PM

dittybopper: If that should happen, it will be justified by the first case publicly, but the real reason for it will be the second case.


Yep.
 
2013-05-06 12:41:53 PM
That's some eXisenZ shiate going on right there.
 
2013-05-06 12:42:44 PM

Fubini: sammyk: Because making a zip gun is so farking hard?

remus: As far as this 3D gun; I don't see it as any different from existing zip guns.  I've seen plans made out of wood before that shoot a single shot.  This isn't much different.  I've yet to hear of one being used in a crime spree, mass shooting, or terrorist event.  It's just not efficient and probably isn't very accurate beyond a short range.

This is just stage 1. Wait until you can 3D print fully functional semi-automatics. The only real problems I can see will be the recoil spring and magazine spring.

You could have a different gun for every robbery.


I don't see how without using a bit more metal for the receiver.  It's not just the pressure, heat, and force from one round you're talking about, but multiple rounds in succession.  A gun heats up quite a bit after shooting a few rounds in a row, I don't see the plastic standing up to that without using more metal.  The other thing is the precision needed to function smoothly.  The feed ramp, receiver, chamber, barrel, etc all have to stay locked together in proper orientation after every shot for it to continue operating.  All of that is good with metal, but plastic just doesn't have the properties, yet.  After a couple of rounds in a row, the plastic will deform just enough to at least jam it if not cause a kabloom.

Perhaps with some advancement in technologies, a plastic will be invented that will survive the environment.  Most likely it will someday.

At present, I could see somebody printing the plans to build the rest of a gun around a few existing metal parts that you probably could buy freely.  That, certainly could allow somebody to build a full auto weapon.  But, it would have measurable metal in it at least.

The real problem is that only thing you can do to prevent it is to pass a law.  That's great, but it won't stop somebody from doing it if they want to.
 
2013-05-06 12:46:20 PM

ZAZ: Best part: suppose you use the gun in a crime, just throw it in any household oven and melt the evidence. No fingerprints, no ballistics, no nothing. Stick a wick in it and call it a candle.

Reminds me of a story, and it might have been a simple riddle or a mystery or even SF, of the man who was shot with an ice cube. No bullet and no ballistics.


Mythbusters did a show on that, the Ice Bullet. It was busted. The heat and energy it took to expel the ice bullet actually melted it before it left the barrel.

You'd have a much better chance of just stabbing someone with an icicle.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-05-06 12:50:52 PM
So how much did he spend making a zip gun?  I've seen these made from car antennas.  I think I could crank out a STEN on my Sherline for a fraction of the price.

I thought about getting one of those little 3d printers, then I wondered what I would make with it, and couldn't think of anything I want that could be made entirely of flimsy plastic.

Even the original Liberator from WW-II was a better gun:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-05-06 12:55:54 PM

Fubini: This is just stage 1. Wait until you can 3D print fully functional semi-automatics. The only real problems I can see will be the recoil spring and magazine spring.

You could have a different gun for every robbery.


Why over-complicate it?  All it takes is one shot.  That's all most people need.  Sure, there will be some tiny-dicked guys out there who constantly strive to make the biggest baddest best gun just so they can show it off and try to look like big men, but your average Joe Schmo just needs something to scare off a robber, and P-Dawg on the corner just needs to put one in the dome of a rival gang member.

And as for robberies, why even bother with a firing gun at all?  Just print out a replica Desert Eagle or S&W, tart her up with a coat of nickel blue, and wave it in the face of Mr. Tran.  He'll fork over the dough.  Most guns used in armed robberies are never fired, but you're not really thinking about that when one is shoved in your face.

Aarontology: I can't wait for this potentially revolutionary technology to be destroyed because some people fear what could be made with it, and because companies don't want people to have the option to make something for themselves instead of having to purchase it.


Yup, that's the REAL story here.  This technology has the power to, within just a few short years, completely change the course of western civilization and decimate the Corporate-Industrial-Complex.  The means of production is being taken out of the factories and placed in people's homes for use on an a-la-carte basis.  That's a game changer for almost every single facet of our lives, from the economy to the environment to putting the focus back on design and innovation instead of marketing and logistics.  If I had any money, I'd be investing heavily in firms who are not only making these machines, but making advancements in new forms of highly-durable extruded polymers.

And a shiny halfpence to the first person to come up with a palatable extruded food printer!
 
2013-05-06 12:59:02 PM

dittybopper: AdolfOliverPanties: Fubini: It will only take one high-profile incident involving a 3D printed gun. Unlike regular firearms, there is no 3D-printed gun lobby who will move heaven and earth to protect 3D printed gun rights.

The NRA will come out openly opposing 3D printed guns.  They will find some way to justify their stance, not openly admitting that they only really exist in the first place to make money for gun manufacturers.

How many times do we have to point out to you that you are incorrect?

Saying the same thing over and over again in the face of damning evidence to the contrary is just silly.


So, it is your assertion that the NRA spends tens of millions of dollars lobbying Washington to defeat gun control laws simply to defend the 2nd Amendment rights of its four million members?  And it pays for those tens of millions in lobbying money with what, the dues paid by the members?

You honestly don't think the NRA is a mouthpiece for weapons manufacturers first and foremost?
 
2013-05-06 01:00:20 PM
People have been making zip guns since gunpowder was invented, why are some so freaked out over this?
 
2013-05-06 01:01:47 PM

remus: I don't see how without using a bit more metal for the receiver.  It's not just the pressure, heat, and force from one round you're talking about, but multiple rounds in succession.  A gun heats up quite a bit after shooting a few rounds in a row, I don't see the plastic standing up to that without using more metal.  The other thing is the precision needed to function smoothly.  The feed ramp, receiver, chamber, barrel, etc all have to stay locked together in proper orientation after every shot for it to continue operating.  All of that is good with metal, but plastic just doesn't have the properties, yet.  After a couple of rounds in a row, the plastic will deform just enough to at least jam it if not cause a kabloom.


I see this kind of thing as being a single-use deal. Even if the heat destroys the gun, all you really need it for is to snap off a few rounds while you're running away. It's also worth noting that the precision is really only necessary for accurate and durable guns- this is the kind of thing you'd use at arm's length.
 
2013-05-06 01:04:16 PM

Fubini: dittybopper: I'm betting some sort of revolver will happen first, perhaps even a pepperbox style.

Much easier to build a revolver using no or very little metal than a semi-auto.

I'd think that'd have to be an extremely chunky cylinder.

 At first, yeah, probably.
One way to mitigate that would be to use larger caliber but much lower pressure rounds.  Another way would be to use metal 'sleeves' to line the cylinders.  If you don't care about the gun being undetectable, you just want a "throw-away" gun, that would be fine.Actually, I could see that being the way to go:  Make a handle with the ratchet and pawl and other bits for a revolver, and the cylinder/barrel group would be like an old pepperbox revolver.  The cylinder/barrel group would be essentially disposable, as it only has to last for the 4, 5, or 6 shots or whatever, and you just dump that when it's done and put in a new, fresh one.  That way, you've always got a "new" barrel.
 
2013-05-06 01:06:01 PM

radarlove: And a shiny halfpence to the first person to come up with a palatable extruded food printer!


They're working on it.
 
2013-05-06 01:08:45 PM

radarlove: Fubini: This is just stage 1. Wait until you can 3D print fully functional semi-automatics. The only real problems I can see will be the recoil spring and magazine spring.

You could have a different gun for every robbery.

Why over-complicate it?  All it takes is one shot.  That's all most people need.  Sure, there will be some tiny-dicked guys out there who constantly strive to make the biggest baddest best gun just so they can show it off and try to look like big men, but your average Joe Schmo just needs something to scare off a robber, and P-Dawg on the corner just needs to put one in the dome of a rival gang member.

And as for robberies, why even bother with a firing gun at all?  Just print out a replica Desert Eagle or S&W, tart her up with a coat of nickel blue, and wave it in the face of Mr. Tran.  He'll fork over the dough.  Most guns used in armed robberies are never fired, but you're not really thinking about that when one is shoved in your face.

Aarontology: I can't wait for this potentially revolutionary technology to be destroyed because some people fear what could be made with it, and because companies don't want people to have the option to make something for themselves instead of having to purchase it.

Yup, that's the REAL story here.  This technology has the power to, within just a few short years, completely change the course of western civilization and decimate the Corporate-Industrial-Complex.  The means of production is being taken out of the factories and placed in people's homes for use on an a-la-carte basis.  That's a game changer for almost every single facet of our lives, from the economy to the environment to putting the focus back on design and innovation instead of marketing and logistics.  If I had any money, I'd be investing heavily in firms who are not only making these machines, but making advancements in new forms of highly-durable extruded polymers.

And a shiny halfpence to the first person to come up with a palatable extrud ...


I was at a university think tank about exactly this, and somebody pointed out that 3D printing could very well create a society in which Marx and Smith were both proved right.  Pretty fascinating.
 
2013-05-06 01:10:24 PM

Popcorn Johnny: People have been making zip guns since gunpowder was invented, why are some so freaked out over this?


Two reasons:

1.  The "won't somebody PLEASE think of the children?!?" angle.  Mom & Pop are going to notice if little Billy is out in the garage all day at the workbench.  But now he can just hit PRINT!  While looking at PORN!  I mean my dear God what's next, a bong that Billy can print out to smoke his reefer-pots with?

-and-

2.  The corporations see what a threat this technology presents to their collective interests, and are pushing the media to run this gun angle as hard as they can in the hopes of killing said technology.  I pray they fail.
 
2013-05-06 01:10:41 PM

radarlove: Yup, that's the REAL story here.  This technology has the power to, within just a few short years, completely change the course of western civilization and decimate the Corporate-Industrial-Complex.  The means of production is being taken out of the factories and placed in people's homes for use on an a-la-carte basis.  That's a game changer for almost every single facet of our lives, from the economy to the environment to putting the focus back on design and innovation instead of marketing and logistics.  If I had any money, I'd be investing heavily in firms who are not only making these machines, but making advancements in new forms of highly-durable extruded polymers.


For sure this is a game changer- but how many things do we use that are really amenable to being cast out of solid pieces of plastic?

None of the following things can be made (or could be made) with a 3D printer you'd ever find in a home:

Anything electronic
Durable goods
Anything longer than a foot or two in any dimension
Anything that includes multiple materials or fabrics or cushions
Anything you'd eat or drink off of
Cotton/Natural Clothes

Think about everything you've bought in the last week. How much of it could be 3D printed, supposing you had a really amazing 3D printer? I can't think of anything off the top of my head.

You don't just want things that are purely functional- you want things that comfortable and aesthetic as well.
 
2013-05-06 01:12:11 PM

Fubini: radarlove: Yup, that's the REAL story here.  This technology has the power to, within just a few short years, completely change the course of western civilization and decimate the Corporate-Industrial-Complex.  The means of production is being taken out of the factories and placed in people's homes for use on an a-la-carte basis.  That's a game changer for almost every single facet of our lives, from the economy to the environment to putting the focus back on design and innovation instead of marketing and logistics.  If I had any money, I'd be investing heavily in firms who are not only making these machines, but making advancements in new forms of highly-durable extruded polymers.

For sure this is a game changer- but how many things do we use that are really amenable to being cast out of solid pieces of plastic?

None of the following things can be made (or could be made) with a 3D printer you'd ever find in a home:

Anything electronic
Durable goods
Anything longer than a foot or two in any dimension
Anything that includes multiple materials or fabrics or cushions
Anything you'd eat or drink off of
Cotton/Natural Clothes

Think about everything you've bought in the last week. How much of it could be 3D printed, supposing you had a really amazing 3D printer? I can't think of anything off the top of my head.

You don't just want things that are purely functional- you want things that comfortable and aesthetic as well.


BASICALLY what i'm saying is that i want a Taco Printer
complete with Hot Sauce Stand
 
2013-05-06 01:15:53 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: BASICALLY what i'm saying is that i want a Taco Printer
complete with Hot Sauce Stand


But the Hot Sauce is where they'll get ya!

Sure it'll only cost about $25-$30 for a taco printer, do you have any idea how expensive hot sauce cartridges will go for?
 
2013-05-06 01:28:50 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: dittybopper: AdolfOliverPanties: Fubini: It will only take one high-profile incident involving a 3D printed gun. Unlike regular firearms, there is no 3D-printed gun lobby who will move heaven and earth to protect 3D printed gun rights.

The NRA will come out openly opposing 3D printed guns.  They will find some way to justify their stance, not openly admitting that they only really exist in the first place to make money for gun manufacturers.

How many times do we have to point out to you that you are incorrect?

Saying the same thing over and over again in the face of damning evidence to the contrary is just silly.

So, it is your assertion that the NRA spends tens of millions of dollars lobbying Washington to defeat gun control laws simply to defend the 2nd Amendment rights of its four million members?  And it pays for those tens of millions in lobbying money with what, the dues paid by the members?

You honestly don't think the NRA is a mouthpiece for weapons manufacturers first and foremost?


OK, say, 4 million members.

Each pays the equivalent of, say, $25 a year in dues.   Some pay more:  dues are $35, last I checked, but associate members who don't get magazines, usually family members of a full member, only pay $15.   With deals and the like, it probably averages to something like $25 a year.

That's $100,000,000 in revenue a year, and that's just dues from members.  That doesn't include donations to the political side of the house, the ILA.

One Hundred *MILLION* farking Dollars a year.  And that's just dues alone.  They raise about the same amount from soliciting donations and selling NRA branded merchandise, to the total of $200 million a year.

That's only a level of about $50 per member.

Oh, and BTW:   They just hit the 5 million member mark.

That's believable, too, because that means membership is up by about 20%-ish, and the convention saw an increase in attendance of about 17% higher than the record set last year (and new members are the least likely to attend the annual meeting).
 
2013-05-06 01:32:11 PM

Fubini: None of the following things can be made (or could be made) with a 3D printer you'd ever find in a home:


Ever is a pretty expansive term.  They have 3D machines that can print metal, btw.

I agree that none of those things is going to happen *SOON*, but I can see it happening in a few decades from now.
 
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