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(Yahoo)   Remember when Zynga decided to stand up to Facebook and say no to their demands for a cut of the action, chosing instead to go it alone? Let's look in on them a year later and see how its going: Yep, exactly as expected   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 21
    More: Fail, Zynga, Farmville, Facebook users, Activision-Blizzard, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, midgets, Rovio  
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5897 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 May 2013 at 11:36 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-06 10:37:25 AM
6 votes:
Zynga's business model was never sustainable. In a short time, they became a bigger studio in the number of employees than some of the mega-studios like Ubisoft (which has 2100 employees) making nothing but crappy facebook and mobile games that depend on microtransactions.

Of course they should embrace austerity, they never should've let it grow bigger than 100 people in the first place.
2013-05-06 10:35:17 AM
4 votes:
Could it be that more people are discovering that their "games" suck?
2013-05-06 12:32:51 PM
3 votes:
Let them burn. The gaming world is better off without Zynga's crap.
2013-05-06 10:54:28 AM
3 votes:
And nothing of value was lost.
2013-05-06 12:31:03 PM
2 votes:
The best thing that we get out of this?

Brian Reynolds, of Alpha Centauri (and Rise Of Nations) fame resigned as Chief Game Designer of Zynga.  Hopefully he will go back to making strategy games again!

/was sad when I found out he had joined Zynga.
2013-05-06 12:15:05 PM
2 votes:

Felgraf: Wasn't part of Zynga's strategy to almost literally steal games wholesale from other people?


What ever gave you that impression?
i.imgur.com
Oh, maybe you read it here.
2013-05-06 12:01:16 PM
2 votes:
Wasn't part of Zynga's strategy to almost literally steal games wholesale from other people?
2013-05-06 11:50:23 AM
2 votes:

EvilEgg: Could it be that more people are discovering that their "games" suck?


they're a terrible company anyways, in many ways they surpassed early 80's Atari for shiatheaded-ness

RockofAges: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

Freemium ain't going anywhere for the next 5-10.


they're financially more stable than AAA games that's for sure, hopefully they stop being just glorified slot machines
2013-05-06 11:48:35 AM
2 votes:

Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.


its not just an issue of micro transactions, which can be done properly to add extra functionality, new maps, new characters, whatever. My beef with the freemium model for many FB or mobile games is that there's very little actual gameplay strategy. The game itself is terrible. All you're doing is clicking to plant crops, build hotels, feed your pet, or whatever, and your actions have little impact on the outcome, especially compared to the effects of buying whatever they're selling, which just gets you nowhere faster.
2013-05-06 11:35:25 AM
2 votes:
I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.
2013-05-06 10:56:10 AM
2 votes:
Hey, let's see if this word works her...

10-30 SECOND AD

...um, ok, what if I switch to another game and t...

10-30 SECOND AD

Fark it, I'm going outside.
2013-05-06 03:45:29 PM
1 votes:

quiotu: thomps: Masso: Zynga should have remained small but tremendously profitable company. They instead chose to go apeshiat big eventhough it's unsustainable. Scaling down is really their only option.

their problem was the same as most high growth start-ups: early investors demanded an exit which means either an IPO or a buy out. in either case you have to scale like a motherf*cker. see also groupon.

Zynga's biggest failure was trying to use AAA market tactics with casual games. You can't flood the casual market, because most casuals can play one game for years and years. Once they were trying too hard to guide casuals to play newer games, it was over.
Casuals just don't spend money. It's a market, but one where a very large demographic spend a very small amount per. Once you have their money, they're incredibly slow to latch onto something else, and your bottom line suffers over time. See also: the Wii.


i'm not sure i agree with that. hasn't one of their major issues with maintaining dominance over the casual market been that the attrition after a couple of months of play is huge? i thought that's the whole point behind flooding the market with new games on 2-3 month release cycles - trying to maintain the overall market share as people jump from latest casual game craze to the next
2013-05-06 01:50:07 PM
1 votes:
AdamK:
they're a terrible company anyways, in many ways they surpassed early 80's Atari for shiatheaded-ness

Pretty much all the Atari shiatheaded-ness was inflicted by Warner after they bought Atari. For younger farkers, they were the original IP-trolls. Basically imagine the first video game/computer company owned by a full fledged member of both the RIAA and MPAA and you have a pretty good idea of what Atari turned into. Internal management was at least as bad. In those days, games were made by one designer: circuits, software (in assembler), artwork, sounds, you name it. As far as management was concerned, these designers were "towel designers", Atari's money came from their brilliant management. One great idea was "use the E.T. IP and sales will skyrocket! We don't even need to make a game, people will buy them as collectors items..." (Atari made more E.T. cartridges than they ever made consoles, no wonder they bulldozed them into a landfill). I rather hope Warner doesn't do the same to Turbine.

From the article: "closed offices in Baltimore, Boston and Tokyo."
So there's a chance Brian Reynolds might make games worth playing again?
-left in February, so there's a chance.
2013-05-06 01:37:10 PM
1 votes:
Gone is the swagger that defined the early years, when Zynga's army of developers flooded the market with dozens of new titles


that's because they stole each and every one of the titles that they released, they have very few /original/ titles. They simply lifted the idea that someone else had, put some better graphics to it and claimed it as theirs. They don't create, they steal and there is no one else to steal from.
2013-05-06 01:22:09 PM
1 votes:

thomps: Masso: Zynga should have remained small but tremendously profitable company. They instead chose to go apeshiat big eventhough it's unsustainable. Scaling down is really their only option.

their problem was the same as most high growth start-ups: early investors demanded an exit which means either an IPO or a buy out. in either case you have to scale like a motherf*cker. see also groupon.


Zynga's biggest failure was trying to use AAA market tactics with casual games. You can't flood the casual market, because most casuals can play one game for years and years. Once they were trying too hard to guide casuals to play newer games, it was over.
Casuals just don't spend money. It's a market, but one where a very large demographic spend a very small amount per. Once you have their money, they're incredibly slow to latch onto something else, and your bottom line suffers over time. See also: the Wii.
2013-05-06 12:31:29 PM
1 votes:
i.imgur.com
2013-05-06 12:18:38 PM
1 votes:

dukeblue219: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

its not just an issue of micro transactions, which can be done properly to add extra functionality, new maps, new characters, whatever. My beef with the freemium model for many FB or mobile games is that there's very little actual gameplay strategy. The game itself is terrible. All you're doing is clicking to plant crops, build hotels, feed your pet, or whatever, and your actions have little impact on the outcome, especially compared to the effects of buying whatever they're selling, which just gets you nowhere faster.


That was my whole issue with Zynga's games, in both graphic and gameplay, they reminded me of nothing so much as the kind of games you used to be able to type in from a computer magazine and play on your C-64.  I  could never understand why people found them so addicting.  I also hate the microtansaction model because it provides an incentive to make the game impossible/very frustrating to play unless you pay for the "upgrades"/extras
2013-05-06 12:16:55 PM
1 votes:

thomps: RockofAges: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

Freemium ain't going anywhere for the next 5-10.

but for only $2.99 you can get a freemium zapper upgrade that will get rid of it now without all of that waiting! DO IT NOW AND TELL YOUR FRIENDS


[Like] [Share] [Hunt down and brutally murder inventor]
2013-05-06 12:13:10 PM
1 votes:
Fark Zynga

Fark Gameloft too, practically all their games are freemium, and some have become unplayable unless you give those assholes money (I'm looking at you Let's Golf 3/Oregon Trail).
2013-05-06 12:09:29 PM
1 votes:
Zynga should have remained small but tremendously profitable company. They instead chose to go apeshiat big eventhough it's unsustainable. Scaling down is really their only option.
2013-05-06 11:05:29 AM
1 votes:

EvilEgg: Could it be that more people are discovering that their "games" suck?


THIS.

Their "games" consist of winning by giving Zynga money and nothing else.
 
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