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(Yahoo)   Remember when Zynga decided to stand up to Facebook and say no to their demands for a cut of the action, chosing instead to go it alone? Let's look in on them a year later and see how its going: Yep, exactly as expected   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 53
    More: Fail, Zynga, Farmville, Facebook users, Activision-Blizzard, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, midgets, Rovio  
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5896 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 May 2013 at 11:36 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-06 10:35:17 AM
Could it be that more people are discovering that their "games" suck?
 
2013-05-06 10:37:02 AM
If only they choosed what they chose instead of chosing what they choosed.

/slightly funny until headline is fixed
 
2013-05-06 10:37:25 AM
Zynga's business model was never sustainable. In a short time, they became a bigger studio in the number of employees than some of the mega-studios like Ubisoft (which has 2100 employees) making nothing but crappy facebook and mobile games that depend on microtransactions.

Of course they should embrace austerity, they never should've let it grow bigger than 100 people in the first place.
 
2013-05-06 10:54:28 AM
And nothing of value was lost.
 
2013-05-06 10:56:10 AM
Hey, let's see if this word works her...

10-30 SECOND AD

...um, ok, what if I switch to another game and t...

10-30 SECOND AD

Fark it, I'm going outside.
 
2013-05-06 11:05:29 AM

EvilEgg: Could it be that more people are discovering that their "games" suck?


THIS.

Their "games" consist of winning by giving Zynga money and nothing else.
 
2013-05-06 11:35:25 AM
I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.
 
2013-05-06 11:39:12 AM

Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.


Freemium ain't going anywhere for the next 5-10.
 
2013-05-06 11:47:31 AM

RockofAges: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

Freemium ain't going anywhere for the next 5-10.


but for only $2.99 you can get a freemium zapper upgrade that will get rid of it now without all of that waiting! DO IT NOW AND TELL YOUR FRIENDS
 
2013-05-06 11:48:35 AM

Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.


its not just an issue of micro transactions, which can be done properly to add extra functionality, new maps, new characters, whatever. My beef with the freemium model for many FB or mobile games is that there's very little actual gameplay strategy. The game itself is terrible. All you're doing is clicking to plant crops, build hotels, feed your pet, or whatever, and your actions have little impact on the outcome, especially compared to the effects of buying whatever they're selling, which just gets you nowhere faster.
 
2013-05-06 11:50:23 AM

EvilEgg: Could it be that more people are discovering that their "games" suck?


they're a terrible company anyways, in many ways they surpassed early 80's Atari for shiatheaded-ness

RockofAges: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

Freemium ain't going anywhere for the next 5-10.


they're financially more stable than AAA games that's for sure, hopefully they stop being just glorified slot machines
 
2013-05-06 11:59:19 AM

dukeblue219: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

its not just an issue of micro transactions, which can be done properly to add extra functionality, new maps, new characters, whatever. My beef with the freemium model for many FB or mobile games is that there's very little actual gameplay strategy. The game itself is terrible. All you're doing is clicking to plant crops, build hotels, feed your pet, or whatever, and your actions have little impact on the outcome, especially compared to the effects of buying whatever they're selling, which just gets you nowhere faster.


Old people love it.
 
2013-05-06 12:01:16 PM
Wasn't part of Zynga's strategy to almost literally steal games wholesale from other people?
 
2013-05-06 12:09:29 PM
Zynga should have remained small but tremendously profitable company. They instead chose to go apeshiat big eventhough it's unsustainable. Scaling down is really their only option.
 
2013-05-06 12:13:10 PM
Fark Zynga

Fark Gameloft too, practically all their games are freemium, and some have become unplayable unless you give those assholes money (I'm looking at you Let's Golf 3/Oregon Trail).
 
2013-05-06 12:15:05 PM

Felgraf: Wasn't part of Zynga's strategy to almost literally steal games wholesale from other people?


What ever gave you that impression?
i.imgur.com
Oh, maybe you read it here.
 
2013-05-06 12:16:55 PM

thomps: RockofAges: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

Freemium ain't going anywhere for the next 5-10.

but for only $2.99 you can get a freemium zapper upgrade that will get rid of it now without all of that waiting! DO IT NOW AND TELL YOUR FRIENDS


[Like] [Share] [Hunt down and brutally murder inventor]
 
2013-05-06 12:18:38 PM

dukeblue219: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

its not just an issue of micro transactions, which can be done properly to add extra functionality, new maps, new characters, whatever. My beef with the freemium model for many FB or mobile games is that there's very little actual gameplay strategy. The game itself is terrible. All you're doing is clicking to plant crops, build hotels, feed your pet, or whatever, and your actions have little impact on the outcome, especially compared to the effects of buying whatever they're selling, which just gets you nowhere faster.


That was my whole issue with Zynga's games, in both graphic and gameplay, they reminded me of nothing so much as the kind of games you used to be able to type in from a computer magazine and play on your C-64.  I  could never understand why people found them so addicting.  I also hate the microtansaction model because it provides an incentive to make the game impossible/very frustrating to play unless you pay for the "upgrades"/extras
 
2013-05-06 12:26:39 PM
They have 3000 employees?

/mind is blown
 
2013-05-06 12:28:42 PM
Almost 18 months after going public, Zynga is staving off fierce competition from newer or nimbler rivals that mimic its games.
Supercell, founded in 2010, has scored with "Hay Day," an iPad game that contains elements resembling FarmVille.


Hang on...where did I leave my world's tiniest violin?  It's around here somewhere...
 
2013-05-06 12:29:00 PM

Masso: Zynga should have remained small but tremendously profitable company. They instead chose to go apeshiat big eventhough it's unsustainable. Scaling down is really their only option.


their problem was the same as most high growth start-ups: early investors demanded an exit which means either an IPO or a buy out. in either case you have to scale like a motherf*cker. see also groupon.
 
2013-05-06 12:31:03 PM
The best thing that we get out of this?

Brian Reynolds, of Alpha Centauri (and Rise Of Nations) fame resigned as Chief Game Designer of Zynga.  Hopefully he will go back to making strategy games again!

/was sad when I found out he had joined Zynga.
 
2013-05-06 12:31:29 PM
i.imgur.com
 
2013-05-06 12:32:51 PM
Let them burn. The gaming world is better off without Zynga's crap.
 
2013-05-06 12:35:01 PM
1) Steal a game from someone else (Scrabble, Wheel of Fortune, etc)
2) Tweak said game to cater to people's instinctive need to hoard complete sets of things.
3) Load it down with ads and microtransactions made to feed that instinct to hoard.
4) Profit
 
2013-05-06 12:47:43 PM
The heart bleeds.
 
2013-05-06 12:57:01 PM
Their business model is based around building shiny computer-screen Skinner boxes - push button-spend money-get virtual food pellet.  That they aren't swimming in cash has to be a sign of gross mismanagement.
 
2013-05-06 01:08:41 PM
Rot in hell, Zynga.
 
2013-05-06 01:12:51 PM

theurge14: 1) Steal a game from someone else (Scrabble, Wheel of Fortune, etc)
2) Tweak said game to cater to people's instinctive need to hoard complete sets of things.
3) Load it down with ads and microtransactions made to feed that instinct to hoard.
4) Profit


Brilliant really.  Seriously. Set aside the moralist component and the nerd rage.They did what Apple does.Find something like people like and modify it to meet the masses base human instincts, all while monetizing it.
 
2013-05-06 01:22:09 PM

thomps: Masso: Zynga should have remained small but tremendously profitable company. They instead chose to go apeshiat big eventhough it's unsustainable. Scaling down is really their only option.

their problem was the same as most high growth start-ups: early investors demanded an exit which means either an IPO or a buy out. in either case you have to scale like a motherf*cker. see also groupon.


Zynga's biggest failure was trying to use AAA market tactics with casual games. You can't flood the casual market, because most casuals can play one game for years and years. Once they were trying too hard to guide casuals to play newer games, it was over.
Casuals just don't spend money. It's a market, but one where a very large demographic spend a very small amount per. Once you have their money, they're incredibly slow to latch onto something else, and your bottom line suffers over time. See also: the Wii.
 
2013-05-06 01:25:42 PM
Although if Zynga can manage to get a hit from one of the gambling/poker games they're working on, all bets are off.
 
2013-05-06 01:37:10 PM
Gone is the swagger that defined the early years, when Zynga's army of developers flooded the market with dozens of new titles


that's because they stole each and every one of the titles that they released, they have very few /original/ titles. They simply lifted the idea that someone else had, put some better graphics to it and claimed it as theirs. They don't create, they steal and there is no one else to steal from.
 
2013-05-06 01:40:36 PM

Grumpy Cat: If only they choosed what they chose instead of chosing what they choosed.

/slightly funny until headline is fixed


I came for the "GOOD." Grumpy Cat pic, but I guess a post from Grumpy Cat will do.
 
2013-05-06 01:41:52 PM

Magorn: dukeblue219: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

its not just an issue of micro transactions, which can be done properly to add extra functionality, new maps, new characters, whatever. My beef with the freemium model for many FB or mobile games is that there's very little actual gameplay strategy. The game itself is terrible. All you're doing is clicking to plant crops, build hotels, feed your pet, or whatever, and your actions have little impact on the outcome, especially compared to the effects of buying whatever they're selling, which just gets you nowhere faster.

That was my whole issue with Zynga's games, in both graphic and gameplay, they reminded me of nothing so much as the kind of games you used to be able to type in from a computer magazine and play on your C-64.  I  could never understand why people found them so addicting.  I also hate the microtansaction model because it provides an incentive to make the game impossible/very frustrating to play unless you pay for the "upgrades"/extras


You're not considering the type of people that play those games.  They don't want strategy where a decision now could impact their gameplay two days from now.  They just want to click and get results.
 
2013-05-06 01:44:27 PM

Zap_Rowsdower: Almost 18 months after going public, Zynga is staving off fierce competition from newer or nimbler rivals that mimic its games.


Zynga accusing someone of mimicking their games is like Apple accusing Microsoft of stealing "their" GUI concept.
 
2013-05-06 01:50:07 PM
AdamK:
they're a terrible company anyways, in many ways they surpassed early 80's Atari for shiatheaded-ness

Pretty much all the Atari shiatheaded-ness was inflicted by Warner after they bought Atari. For younger farkers, they were the original IP-trolls. Basically imagine the first video game/computer company owned by a full fledged member of both the RIAA and MPAA and you have a pretty good idea of what Atari turned into. Internal management was at least as bad. In those days, games were made by one designer: circuits, software (in assembler), artwork, sounds, you name it. As far as management was concerned, these designers were "towel designers", Atari's money came from their brilliant management. One great idea was "use the E.T. IP and sales will skyrocket! We don't even need to make a game, people will buy them as collectors items..." (Atari made more E.T. cartridges than they ever made consoles, no wonder they bulldozed them into a landfill). I rather hope Warner doesn't do the same to Turbine.

From the article: "closed offices in Baltimore, Boston and Tokyo."
So there's a chance Brian Reynolds might make games worth playing again?
-left in February, so there's a chance.
 
2013-05-06 01:55:41 PM

AdamK: EvilEgg: Could it be that more people are discovering that their "games" suck?

they're a terrible company anyways, in many ways they surpassed early 80's Atari for shiatheaded-ness

RockofAges: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

Freemium ain't going anywhere for the next 5-10.

they're financially more stable than AAA games that's for sure, hopefully they stop being just glorified slot machines


I hope everyone is ready for when the AAAs follow EA's lead.  They've announced every single game, even 60$ ones, will have microtransactions in the future.

It's just too easy to program in, and too lucrative not to.  Weapons, racetracks, armor, items, coloration, quests, are all being rethought and broken down in way that can be sold piecemeal to you.

This has the added benefit of locking a game to an account, meaning piracy is reduced, but also having the added benefit of eliminating all borrowing and reselling of used games.

The next generation of games is going to be a strange one.  They've finally figured out how to uniquely monetize interactive entertainment, and I doubt we're every going to see them roll it back.
 
2013-05-06 01:56:46 PM

BHShaman: theurge14: 1) Steal a game from someone else (Scrabble, Wheel of Fortune, etc)
2) Tweak said game to cater to people's instinctive need to hoard complete sets of things.
3) Load it down with ads and microtransactions made to feed that instinct to hoard.
4) Profit

Brilliant really.  Seriously. Set aside the moralist component and the nerd rage.They did what Apple does.Find something like people like and modify it to meet the masses base human instincts, all while monetizing it.


A very wise businessman once said to me: Nobody gets rich by blazing a trail.  The rich one is the second guy to market who can coast in the tracks of the trailbalzer and learn form his mistakes for free
 
2013-05-06 02:13:27 PM

lucksi: They have 3000 employees?

/mind is blown


I've occasionally driven past their Mountain View office (near the Middlefield light rail station).  They occupy the entire building, and from the outside it looks easily large enough for several hundred workers.
 
2013-05-06 02:17:33 PM

Magorn: A very wise businessman once said to me: Nobody gets rich by blazing a trail. The rich one is the second guy to market who can coast in the tracks of the trailbalzer and learn form his mistakes for free


That seems pretty obvious to me, trailblazers are certain kinds of people. They don't have a whole lot of fear and are totally into exploring their ideas. They're in it for the fun, not the money and as long as they have enough to pay the bills they really don't care that #2 makes more when it's a stolen idea. If you have to steal it, your income is limited (see - this thread and the predictability of Zynga needing to downsize). When you're the one who cranks out the money-grabbing ideas you really don't have all that much to worry about until you start having dificulty spotting the trend. What you are when you aim at being #2 is the weasel who's out to play the "got mine, fark you" game. That's pretty easy to spot, too you know. It's kind of hard to take ideas that no one wants to share with you anymore.

/not that it matters
//everything you've thought of, so has someone else
///slashies in three's
 
2013-05-06 02:39:06 PM
Whatever happened to that other crappy company, Kabam?
 
2013-05-06 03:00:26 PM
It's gotten to the point where I refuse to play microtransaction games

Quit PoE
Now playing Torchlight 2. Seems kinda light on content on first playthrough.
 
2013-05-06 03:10:45 PM

Dragonflew: Grumpy Cat: If only they choosed what they chose instead of chosing what they choosed.

/slightly funny until headline is fixed

I came for the "GOOD." Grumpy Cat pic, but I guess a post from Grumpy Cat will do.


I come in many forms. Some not as funny as others.
 
2013-05-06 03:14:10 PM

Dragonflew: Zap_Rowsdower: Almost 18 months after going public, Zynga is staving off fierce competition from newer or nimbler rivals that mimic its games.

Zynga accusing someone of mimicking their games is like Apple accusing Microsoft of stealing "their" GUI concept.


Apparently, an urban myth.

It was Jef Raskin that received a PhD for his thesis on the Graphical User Interface (GUI) at Penn State University in 1967. He coined the term QuickDraw, which is very important because if you ask any true Mac software developer (pre-NeXTStep) the will tell you that QuickDraw is the official name for the foundation software used to draw the GUI on the Apple Macintosh.

Xerox PARC was founded in 1970 as a division of Xerox Corporation, so its was impossible for Xerox PARC to have invented anything before Jef because they did not exist until three years after he was awarded his PhD for the very GUI that Apple used.

Jef then went on to be the "Father of the Macintosh" at Apple, based on the foundation he created in his 1967 thesis. 

Please. Proceed.
 
2013-05-06 03:19:32 PM
the will they will

ftfm
 
2013-05-06 03:45:29 PM

quiotu: thomps: Masso: Zynga should have remained small but tremendously profitable company. They instead chose to go apeshiat big eventhough it's unsustainable. Scaling down is really their only option.

their problem was the same as most high growth start-ups: early investors demanded an exit which means either an IPO or a buy out. in either case you have to scale like a motherf*cker. see also groupon.

Zynga's biggest failure was trying to use AAA market tactics with casual games. You can't flood the casual market, because most casuals can play one game for years and years. Once they were trying too hard to guide casuals to play newer games, it was over.
Casuals just don't spend money. It's a market, but one where a very large demographic spend a very small amount per. Once you have their money, they're incredibly slow to latch onto something else, and your bottom line suffers over time. See also: the Wii.


i'm not sure i agree with that. hasn't one of their major issues with maintaining dominance over the casual market been that the attrition after a couple of months of play is huge? i thought that's the whole point behind flooding the market with new games on 2-3 month release cycles - trying to maintain the overall market share as people jump from latest casual game craze to the next
 
2013-05-06 04:53:06 PM
FTFA: It has trimmed 5 percent of its workforce, though its headcount of nearly 3,000 still dwarfs that of fierce rivals like Supercell, a Finnish company with 100 people that claims an equivalent amount of revenue

Now that is just farking pathetic.
 
DYI
2013-05-06 06:40:49 PM

I read fark for the pics: It's gotten to the point where I refuse to play microtransaction games

Quit PoE
Now playing Torchlight 2. Seems kinda light on content on first playthrough.


You should try the synergies mod. Adds a whole lot of gameplay to TL2
 
2013-05-06 07:38:57 PM

lucksi: They have 3000 employees?

/mind is blown


shiat. They could run with with 300 max. Do they have like one guy in charge of just designing little pixel sheep and another in charge of little pixel cows?
 
2013-05-06 11:36:29 PM

AdamK: EvilEgg: Could it be that more people are discovering that their "games" suck?

they're a terrible company anyways, in many ways they surpassed early 80's Atari for shiatheaded-ness

RockofAges: Thoguh: I sincerely hope that this is the beginning of the end for "microtransactions" being the goal of every game.  I don't care if it is a free game.  But if I drop some cash to buy a game then I don't want to be pressured to spend more money to actually play it.

Freemium ain't going anywhere for the next 5-10.

they're financially more stable than AAA games that's for sure, hopefully they stop being just glorified slot machines


Actually, the FB slots are better, 'cuz they actually give you more to play with for free every few hours.
 
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