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(Onion AV Club)   Nine alternate universe takes on The Great Gatsby   (avclub.com) divider line 34
    More: Silly, Jay Gatsby, The Great Gatsby, Joseph P. Kennedy, Blair Underwood, David Duchovny, Californication, Spanish Harlem, Vincent Chase  
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3974 clicks; posted to FarkUs » on 06 May 2013 at 9:15 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-06 09:23:49 AM
If only there were a universe where someone cared.
 
2013-05-06 09:40:51 AM
They forgot this one: http://youtu.be/Z47lsl4_URo
 
2013-05-06 09:44:09 AM
That browser game is awesome.
 
2013-05-06 09:44:43 AM
I think the fake NES game was posted to Fark when it first came out. Good fun.
 
2013-05-06 09:59:32 AM
They all take place in Dafuq?
 
2013-05-06 10:00:31 AM
Is there one where this story was actually interesting?
 
2013-05-06 10:13:00 AM

Electric_Banana: Is there one where this story was actually interesting?


No. Fitzgerald is unbearable in all possible universes.
 
2013-05-06 10:38:06 AM

odinsposse: Electric_Banana: Is there one where this story was actually interesting?

No. Fitzgerald is unbearable in all possible universes.


I have a feeling this latest adaptation will be a crapfest of epic proportion.
 
2013-05-06 10:50:43 AM
Anyone find this "write a related article about a big movie that's coming out" style of marketing sickening?
 
2013-05-06 11:00:20 AM
Most overrated novel in any universe.  The final paragraph is the best thing about the novel.
 
2013-05-06 11:51:13 AM

Infinite Monkeys In Front Of A Computer: I have a feeling this latest adaptation will be a crapfest of epic proportion.


It can't be anything else.  The source material won't allow it.  Anything by F. Scott Fitzgerald is an excellent case study on how to write.  The Great Gatsby has a cohesive plot, an effective point of view, great pacing, well-developed characters and excellent literary technique.  The only problem with it, and this is arguably a pretty big problem, is that nobody gives a shiat about first-world drama.  Translating The Great Gatsby into a visual experience takes away every reason to read the novel at all, because the writing is the only thing good about it.  Take that away and you're left with a bland soap opera.
 
2013-05-06 11:55:32 AM
Why dont they make a Holden Caufield movie instead.
 
2013-05-06 12:10:03 PM
What book does Nick Carraway narrate was one of the questions at my Jeopardy audition last week.  My wife told me I was wrong, but thankfully the internetz vindicated me when I got home.
 
2013-05-06 12:45:54 PM

GypsyJoker: Most overrated novel in any universe.  The final paragraph is the best thing about the novel.


The final paragraph is fantastic.

I cannot think of a single paragraph from Scarlet Letter that merits the same compliment.
 
2013-05-06 01:01:21 PM

K.B.O. Winston: GypsyJoker: Most overrated novel in any universe.  The final paragraph is the best thing about the novel.

The final paragraph is fantastic.

I cannot think of a single paragraph from Scarlet Letter that merits the same compliment.


I think the party where all the towns kids keep chanting "Hester, Hester, preacher molester" is pretty good.
 
2013-05-06 03:15:20 PM

K.B.O. Winston: GypsyJoker: Most overrated novel in any universe.  The final paragraph is the best thing about the novel.

The final paragraph is fantastic.


Agreed.  It's beautifully written.  If only the rest was that good.
 
2013-05-06 03:16:54 PM

dragonchild: Infinite Monkeys In Front Of A Computer: I have a feeling this latest adaptation will be a crapfest of epic proportion.

It can't be anything else.  The source material won't allow it.  Anything by F. Scott Fitzgerald is an excellent case study on how to write.  The Great Gatsby has a cohesive plot, an effective point of view, great pacing, well-developed characters and excellent literary technique.  The only problem with it, and this is arguably a pretty big problem, is that nobody gives a shiat about first-world drama.  Translating The Great Gatsby into a visual experience takes away every reason to read the novel at all, because the writing is the only thing good about it.  Take that away and you're left with a bland soap opera.


I liked The Great Gatsby, it's a great snapshot of the 20's. Sadly I was one of the few kids in my Honors English that actually read it and didn't fall asleep when the teacher put on the audiobook after so many kids complained about how "hard" it was.

Sure the first half of the book has a lot of set-up and it can be a little dry but it's not a hard book to read. It's a few hundred pages, well written, and the second half of the book really picks up and is exciting. Lord of the Flies is very similar.

Have some patience people!

/Loved The Brothers Karamazov
//Now that's a hard book for a High Schooler
 
2013-05-06 03:20:41 PM
Oh look...fan fiction.
 
2013-05-06 03:34:46 PM

K.B.O. Winston: GypsyJoker: Most overrated novel in any universe.  The final paragraph is the best thing about the novel.

The final paragraph is fantastic.

I cannot think of a single paragraph from Scarlet Letter that merits the same compliment.


I really liked the part where the preacher is trying to get Hester to confess who the Dad is and she basically tells him to fark off.

I can't remember the exact words but it's something like "She (the baby) has a Heavenly Father and that's all she needs!"

The language can be a bit dense to High Schoolers (outside of a AP class) so it's probably better for it to be a college text.
 
2013-05-06 04:21:26 PM

dragonchild: Infinite Monkeys In Front Of A Computer: I have a feeling this latest adaptation will be a crapfest of epic proportion.

It can't be anything else.  The source material won't allow it.  Anything by F. Scott Fitzgerald is an excellent case study on how to write.  The Great Gatsby has a cohesive plot, an effective point of view, great pacing, well-developed characters and excellent literary technique.  The only problem with it, and this is arguably a pretty big problem, is that nobody gives a shiat about first-world drama.  Translating The Great Gatsby into a visual experience takes away every reason to read the novel at all, because the writing is the only thing good about it.  Take that away and you're left with a bland soap opera.


Oddly enough I felt the same way about the characters in the book Game of Thrones, but I find the TV show very engaging.
 
2013-05-06 04:42:16 PM

odinsposse: Electric_Banana: Is there one where this story was actually interesting?

No. Fitzgerald is unbearable in all possible universes.


So much this. I've never understood the universal wankery for this tome of tedium. At least people make fun of Dickens.
 
2013-05-06 05:00:14 PM

Tyrone Slothrop: dragonchild: Infinite Monkeys In Front Of A Computer: I have a feeling this latest adaptation will be a crapfest of epic proportion.

It can't be anything else.  The source material won't allow it.  Anything by F. Scott Fitzgerald is an excellent case study on how to write.  The Great Gatsby has a cohesive plot, an effective point of view, great pacing, well-developed characters and excellent literary technique.  The only problem with it, and this is arguably a pretty big problem, is that nobody gives a shiat about first-world drama.  Translating The Great Gatsby into a visual experience takes away every reason to read the novel at all, because the writing is the only thing good about it.  Take that away and you're left with a bland soap opera.

Oddly enough I felt the same way about the characters in the book Game of Thrones, but I find the TV show very engaging.


It's because GRRM used to work in TV script writing, he was a writer on that "Beauty and the Beast" show back in the 80's that was very popular.

He knew how Hollywood worked so he kept on refusing to sell his rights until HBO came along and impressed him and gave him some creative control.

There's only very few changes I haven't been happy with and very single actor they picked fits their roll perfectly.

(TV AND MILD BOOK SPOILERS)

I'm not exactly happy with them adding even more sex and I'm a little lost as to why they got rid of Jenye Westerling and replaced her with a Volanti.  I don't like how Stannis' wife is now aware of the affair and making Catelyn more sympathetic to Jon.
 
2013-05-06 06:16:49 PM

Fear the Clam: odinsposse: Electric_Banana: Is there one where this story was actually interesting?

No. Fitzgerald is unbearable in all possible universes.

So much this. I've never understood the universal wankery for this tome of tedium. At least people make fun of Dickens.


I've had to read a lot of the stereotypical  high school and college texts (Scarlet Letter, To Kill a Mockingbird, lots of Shakespeare, etc) and though I wasn't a huge fan of them all I could at least appreciate them.  Fitzgerald, on the other hand, was unbearable to read.  Just couldn't keep reading it.
 
2013-05-06 07:01:04 PM
Not understanding all the Fitzgerald hate in this thread. Are we really that illiterate now? Are you all sure you aren't thinking of Steinbeck?
 
2013-05-06 07:44:48 PM

mrjared: Not understanding all the Fitzgerald hate in this thread.


Probably due to it being assigned reading for so many people at some point.

I developed an appreciation for him later in life (didnt have Gatsby forced on me in High school) after hearing Garrison Keillor narrate a couple short stories and then later read Gatsby for the first time at age 28 just for fun.

Also, I think I'm the only person on earth that actually enjoyed the 1974 film version.

/ esp the guy who played George Wilson
// he also played one of the murderers (Dick Hickock) in the 1968 version of In Cold Blood
 
2013-05-06 07:58:33 PM

mrjared: Not understanding all the Fitzgerald hate in this thread. Are we really that illiterate now? Are you all sure you aren't thinking of Steinbeck?



In reference to bad, Hacky, over-analyzed and over-read works? Yes.


There is only one reason why SteinbeckFitzgerald, RandLaura Wilder,  etc get so much play, and that is because when most of the standard boilerplate school curriculums and "recommended reading lists" were established, these books were contemporary. Since administrations rarely bother to update such lists (mainly out of pure laziness) these books just kept hanging around.

And with each passing decade, each generation finds it harder and harder to relate to the stories because the context in which they were written, and in which they were intended to be read, is completely foreign to them.
 
2013-05-06 08:06:26 PM

TomD9938: mrjared: Not understanding all the Fitzgerald hate in this thread.

Probably due to it being assigned reading for so many people at some point.

I developed an appreciation for him later in life (didnt have Gatsby forced on me in High school) after hearing Garrison Keillor narrate a couple short stories and then later read Gatsby for the first time at age 28 just for fun.

Also, I think I'm the only person on earth that actually enjoyed the 1974 film version.

/ esp the guy who played George Wilson
// he also played one of the murderers (Dick Hickock) in the 1968 version of In Cold Blood


How is the Western Canon like anal sex? You won't want to try either if you were forced to do it as a child.
 
2013-05-06 09:04:13 PM

LemSkroob: And with each passing decade, each generation finds it harder and harder to relate to the stories because the context in which they were written, and in which they were intended to be read, is completely foreign to them.


Oh, I was able to relate to them just fine.  I stayed awake in history class, so it's not like I needed to be alive in the 1920s.  And I had decent English teachers that were willing to provide bit history lessons as needed.

I actually enjoyed reading Steinbeck because at least in his stories there was something at stake.  Fitzgerald is the far more talented writer, but I really don't give a shiat about some nobody touring a world of rich crazy people.  I had to read several of Fitzgerald's works in high school and that seemed to be all he ever wrote about -- in fact, among the works I was exposed to, The Great Gatsby was one of the less wangsty emo drivel he wrote.
 
2013-05-06 09:54:46 PM

LemSkroob: mrjared: Not understanding all the Fitzgerald hate in this thread. Are we really that illiterate now? Are you all sure you aren't thinking of Steinbeck?


In reference to bad, Hacky, over-analyzed and over-read works? Yes.


There is only one reason why Steinbeck,  Fitzgerald, Rand,  Laura Wilder,  etc get so much play, and that is because when most of the standard boilerplate school curriculums and "recommended reading lists" were established, these books were contemporary. Since administrations rarely bother to update such lists (mainly out of pure laziness) these books just kept hanging around.

And with each passing decade, each generation finds it harder and harder to relate to the stories because the context in which they were written, and in which they were intended to be read, is completely foreign to them.


That I do agree with you a lot, I'm lucky I got into a new High School with young Teachers that switched the books up a lot.

I absolutely can't stand The Catcher in the Rye, it's a whiny rich kid novel and I cannot stand it! UGH!!!!!
 
2013-05-06 10:55:22 PM

shortymac: LemSkroob: mrjared: Not understanding all the Fitzgerald hate in this thread. Are we really that illiterate now? Are you all sure you aren't thinking of Steinbeck?


In reference to bad, Hacky, over-analyzed and over-read works? Yes.


There is only one reason why Steinbeck,  Fitzgerald, Rand,  Laura Wilder,  etc get so much play, and that is because when most of the standard boilerplate school curriculums and "recommended reading lists" were established, these books were contemporary. Since administrations rarely bother to update such lists (mainly out of pure laziness) these books just kept hanging around.

And with each passing decade, each generation finds it harder and harder to relate to the stories because the context in which they were written, and in which they were intended to be read, is completely foreign to them.

That I do agree with you a lot, I'm lucky I got into a new High School with young Teachers that switched the books up a lot.

I absolutely can't stand The Catcher in the Rye, it's a whiny rich kid novel and I cannot stand it! UGH!!!!!


Yeah, JD Salinger is another. Good for you to have gone into a "new" school. I went to NYC public High Shool in the 90s. The building was over 100 years old, the books we read were 40+ years old (no, not the age of the writing, but the actual age of the printed material), and most of the staff were 70 years old, and the BoE has a mental capacity of a 150 year old. Change simply does not happen. So you get stuck with books that no kid can relate to, no matter how well written, and every year Eng101 has the exact same syllabus they used for that course for six decades.
 
2013-05-06 11:22:06 PM

LemSkroob: shortymac: LemSkroob: mrjared: Not understanding all the Fitzgerald hate in this thread. Are we really that illiterate now? Are you all sure you aren't thinking of Steinbeck?


In reference to bad, Hacky, over-analyzed and over-read works? Yes.


There is only one reason why Steinbeck,  Fitzgerald, Rand,  Laura Wilder,  etc get so much play, and that is because when most of the standard boilerplate school curriculums and "recommended reading lists" were established, these books were contemporary. Since administrations rarely bother to update such lists (mainly out of pure laziness) these books just kept hanging around.

And with each passing decade, each generation finds it harder and harder to relate to the stories because the context in which they were written, and in which they were intended to be read, is completely foreign to them.

That I do agree with you a lot, I'm lucky I got into a new High School with young Teachers that switched the books up a lot.

I absolutely can't stand The Catcher in the Rye, it's a whiny rich kid novel and I cannot stand it! UGH!!!!!

Yeah, JD Salinger is another. Good for you to have gone into a "new" school. I went to NYC public High Shool in the 90s. The building was over 100 years old, the books we read were 40+ years old (no, not the age of the writing, but the actual age of the printed material), and most of the staff were 70 years old, and the BoE has a mental capacity of a 150 year old. Change simply does not happen. So you get stuck with books that no kid can relate to, no matter how well written, and every year Eng101 has the exact same syllabus they used for that course for six decades.


I got lucky, I also had an awesome English teacher (thank you Mr. Sab!).

My Mom went to Catholic High School in the 70's with aging nuns that used to fall asleep at the chalkboards, screw up lessons and would rap your knuckles if you corrected them.
 
2013-05-07 01:22:08 AM
Do they have a version with a setting with unstupid city names?
 
2013-05-07 09:17:18 AM
Who knew....take out the freaky sex scenes, write a coherent plot, and fan fiction CAN be profitable.
 
2013-05-07 05:01:13 PM

arbitterm: Who knew....take out the freaky sex scenes, write a coherent plot, and fan fiction CAN be profitable.


If anything, you keep the kinky sex scenes... 50 shades of Grey anyone?
 
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