If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New Yorker)   Forty-nine words in the English language first appeared in a book that may not exist. How perfectly cromulent   (newyorker.com) divider line 78
    More: Interesting, English language, Google Books, mad man, first appeared, Oxford English Dictionary  
•       •       •

17999 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 May 2013 at 2:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



78 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-05 12:58:21 AM  
A guy who successfully trolled the OED 47 times in 1852? 4Chan has found their Moses.
 
2013-05-05 02:13:42 AM  

vossiewulf: A guy who successfully trolled the OED 47 times in 1852? 4Chan has found their Moses.


He was just trying to embiggen the English language
 
2013-05-05 02:15:26 AM  
Well if a period catalogue lists it its entirely possible it existed and just didnt have the staying power to get later editions(although youd think a book that was popular enough to get 49 words in the dictionary would stick around)
 
2013-05-05 02:16:01 AM  
Maybe they should ask Lucien.

cdn.smosh.com
 
2013-05-05 02:16:36 AM  
Meh, ive got the hardcover and the paperback version.
 
2013-05-05 02:21:08 AM  

"Forty-nine words in the English language first appeared in a book that may not exist. "


The House of Leaves. Part Deux? I still haven't finished that book, it's so many pages, references, footnotes. And even though I am more than two-thirds through, the story just makes no sense. The Navison Record on its own makes a pretty good horror story (without all the formatting gimmicks). Everything else around it is just confusing.

 
2013-05-05 02:24:15 AM  
Oh freddled gruntbuggly,
Thy micturitions are to me,
As plurdled gabbleblotchits,
On a lurgid bee,
That mordiously hath bitled out,
Its earted jurtles,
Into a rancid festering confectious inner-sphincter. [drowned out by moaning and screaming]
Now the jurpling slayjid agrocrustles,
Are slurping hagrilly up the axlegrurts,
And living glupules frart and slipulate,
Like jowling meated liverslime,
Groop, I implore thee, my foonting turling dromes,
And hooptiously drangle me,
With crinkly bindlewurdles,
Or else I shall rend thee in the gobberwarts with my blurglecruncheon,
See if I don't.

Oh, and another writer who made up plenty of words:

encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-05-05 02:25:46 AM  
And the article lists two of the words? Nice reporting.
 
2013-05-05 02:33:51 AM  
Pshaw, that's nothing.  Rock-and-Roll music was never invented, it just appeared out of nowhere at a high school dance in 1955.
 
2013-05-05 02:34:51 AM  

Oldiron_79: Well if a period catalogue lists it its entirely possible it existed and just didnt have the staying power to get later editions(although youd think a book that was popular enough to get 49 words in the dictionary would stick around)


It didn't have to be that popular -- all 49 instances could have been submitted by one person. The appearance in the catalogue argues against its being 100% a hoax, but catalogues sometimes listed books which were meant to be published but for one reason or another, never were. The book may have been written but never actually available for the general book-buyer. People do love to play jokes in their reference books, though; I remember reading one encyclopedia of crime which listed a number of Ambrose Bierce short stories as factual occurrences. (Of course, they weren't doing anything old Ambrose himself hadn't done -- those short stories originally appeared in the S.F. Examiner, without any disclaimer that they were fictional).
 
2013-05-05 02:41:13 AM  
If the book did not exist it would be necessary to invent it.
 
2013-05-05 02:42:54 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org

It would take a gargantuan imagination.
 
2013-05-05 02:43:53 AM  
All words are made up, destivites if you will.

/and swent you if you don't
 
2013-05-05 02:46:08 AM  

scalpod: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x272]

It would take a  gargantuan imagination.


I tend to credit Quentin Tarantino with that particular word's revival within the parlance of our times.
 
2013-05-05 02:48:17 AM  

bigstoopidbruce: Pshaw, that's nothing.  Rock-and-Roll music was never invented, it just appeared out of nowhere at a high school dance in 1955.


Interesting. I would like to hear your whole pompatis on this theory.
 
2013-05-05 02:49:59 AM  
I love crazy esoteric crap like this. I hope it is a real book. I worked a stint in a book depository for a while so I definitely feel a strong allure to obscure, old books. There's something incredibly fascinating about all those old books written by forgot authors that have been sitting on shelves for nearly a century without being checked out, much less thought about, by anyone.
 
2013-05-05 02:51:29 AM  
What the hell is a book?
 
2013-05-05 02:51:41 AM  

Foxxinnia: I love crazy esoteric crap like this. I hope it is a real book. I worked a stint in a book depository for a while so I definitely feel a strong allure to obscure, old books. There's something incredibly fascinating about all those old books written by forgot authors that have been sitting on shelves for nearly a century without being checked out, much less thought about, by anyone.


Was it in Dallas?
 
2013-05-05 02:51:58 AM  
The book is cited as an early source for words like "chapelled"

s3.amazonaws.com

I've got another made up word for ya.

badonkadonk
 
2013-05-05 02:53:21 AM  

banandar123: What the hell is a book?


Its a bunch of pieces of paper bound together with writing on them, but thats not whats important right now.
 
2013-05-05 02:56:42 AM  

Claude Ballse: scalpod: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x272]

It would take a  gargantuan imagination.

I tend to credit Quentin Tarantino with that particular word's revival within the parlance of our times.


I tend to credit my having read Gargantua and Pantagruel.
 
2013-05-05 02:58:31 AM  
That's nothing.

James Joyce wrote an entire book out of made up words.
 
2013-05-05 03:05:32 AM  

jtown: Oh freddled gruntbuggly,
Thy micturitions are to me,
As plurdled gabbleblotchits,
On a lurgid bee,
That mordiously hath bitled out,
Its earted jurtles,
Into a rancid festering confectious inner-sphincter. [drowned out by moaning and screaming]
Now the jurpling slayjid agrocrustles,
Are slurping hagrilly up the axlegrurts,
And living glupules frart and slipulate,
Like jowling meated liverslime,
Groop, I implore thee, my foonting turling dromes,
And hooptiously drangle me,
With crinkly bindlewurdles,
Or else I shall rend thee in the gobberwarts with my blurglecruncheon,
See if I don't.

Oh, and another writer who made up plenty of words:


Yeah I think Shakespere literally invented something like 50% or more of the English language. Cant really discuss making up words without mentioning him.
 
2013-05-05 03:09:41 AM  

Oldiron_79: j
Yeah I think Shakespere literally invented something like 50% or more of the English language. Cant really discuss making up words without mentioning him.


Inventing the words and being the first historical source for them are two different things.

Wm S still deserves mad props.
 
2013-05-05 03:17:22 AM  

jtown: Oh freddled gruntbuggly,



'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!

The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!

Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun

The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand;

Long time the manxome foe he sought-

So rested he by the Tumtum tree

And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,

The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through

The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?

Come to my arms, my beamish boy!

O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!"

He chortled in his joy.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.
 
2013-05-05 03:18:46 AM  
Well, the parsed funny.
 
2013-05-05 03:19:00 AM  
They're probably all loanwords from Uqbar.
 
2013-05-05 03:21:49 AM  

skinink: "Forty-nine words in the English language first appeared in a book that may not exist. "
The House of Leaves. Part Deux? I still haven't finished that book, it's so many pages, references, footnotes. And even though I am more than two-thirds through, the story just makes no sense. The Navison Record on its own makes a pretty good horror story (without all the formatting gimmicks). Everything else around it is just confusing.


I still haven't read the first though...

My friends, at least the ones who know my thought processes while engaged in a good book, have warned me multiple times not to read it.

They all say I would love it... but I shouldn't read it.

/huge HUGE fan of Marks sister though..
 
2013-05-05 03:22:09 AM  

maxheck: They're probably all loanwords from Uqbar.


Yeah, anybody with a passing familiarity of the works of Herbert Quain could've seen this one coming.
 
2013-05-05 03:22:43 AM  

maxheck: They're probably all loanwords from Uqbar.


Tlonwords from Uqbar, you mean.
 
2013-05-05 03:31:20 AM  

bigstoopidbruce: Pshaw, that's nothing.  Rock-and-Roll music was never invented, it just appeared out of nowhere at a high school dance in 1955.


That's heavy.
 
2013-05-05 03:32:42 AM  
No love for the runcible spoon?

/but I'm sure there's plenty of love for the Bong-tree.
 
2013-05-05 03:41:21 AM  
Shakespeare?
 
2013-05-05 04:04:15 AM  
That was fascinating.

/off to revirginize myself
 
2013-05-05 04:05:43 AM  
That sounds plusgood!
 
Xai
2013-05-05 04:08:48 AM  
The best place to start looking for a book would be the British library - they have a copy of every book ever published.
 
2013-05-05 04:15:27 AM  
Why don't they just download it on kindle?
 
2013-05-05 04:33:51 AM  

scalpod: Claude Ballse: scalpod: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x272]

It would take a  gargantuan imagination.

I tend to credit Quentin Tarantino with that particular word's revival within the parlance of our times.

I tend to credit my having read Gargantua and Pantagruel.


I would go with Dungeons and Dragons.

On topic note that 49 words quote from this book may not cease to exist if this book isn't found, it might just be the first appearance of them will be updated. Be interesting if the first instance is now the 1928 OED, and thus the word now exists but only because it was listed in the OED.
 
2013-05-05 04:57:08 AM  

Shadow Blasko: skinink: "Forty-nine words in the English language first appeared in a book that may not exist. "
The House of Leaves. Part Deux? I still haven't finished that book, it's so many pages, references, footnotes. And even though I am more than two-thirds through, the story just makes no sense. The Navison Record on its own makes a pretty good horror story (without all the formatting gimmicks). Everything else around it is just confusing.

I still haven't read the first though...

My friends, at least the ones who know my thought processes while engaged in a good book, have warned me multiple times not to read it.

They all say I would love it... but I shouldn't read it.

/huge HUGE fan of Marks sister though..


I can't get into Leaves of Grass. The story isn't my cup of tea and the format gimmicks are just that.
 
2013-05-05 05:06:07 AM  
1.bp.blogspot.com

That book?  It's an interesting story, actually...
 
2013-05-05 05:20:54 AM  
What a Duketastrophy!
 
2013-05-05 05:30:19 AM  

scalpod: [upload.wikimedia.org image 220x272]

It would take a gargantuan imagination.


Rabel, rabel...
 
2013-05-05 05:48:29 AM  

Xai: The best place to start looking for a book would be the British library - they have a copy of every book ever published.


I'll bet they never even considered it.
 
2013-05-05 05:54:45 AM  
It's London, 1854. You work for a not-very-busy wholesale book warehouse, cataloging book titles all day long. You're of a bookish, antisocial mindset, given to longwindedness and of a trollish bent --a protoFarker, if you will-- and every so often you like to imagine the novels you'd write if you had the energy to do such a thing. And every so often you just accidentally one or two of the imaginary titles in the New Arrivals list in the catalog, with a chuckle, just to see. Sometimes it happens. "Meanderings of Memory,", you say. Ah, no, none on the shelf. It appears we're all sold out although the card file says we have two. I can put it on order for you. I'll have it here in a fortnight.So one day you're making your sad way in the drizzle back to your cramped one-room flat beneath King's Cross Station, eating your fish-and-chips, when you see in a not-too-greasy corner of the evening Standard wrapping your dinner that the easily led sheep at the OED are laughably appealing to the British public to submit new words and their sources.
 
2013-05-05 05:56:45 AM  

Xai: The best place to start looking for a book would be the British library - they have a copy of every book ever published.


They do have a lot, but when I was catloging the library my grandfather left my mother and I, I couldn't find any trace of about 30% of the books anywhere.
 
2013-05-05 06:22:47 AM  

Xai: The best place to start looking for a book would be the British library - they have a copy of every book ever published.


Except not.

Because the British National institutions post-date the emergence of the Modern English language, this simply isn't so.

// additionally, Fire has played a part in destroying many texts available previously.
 
2013-05-05 06:37:15 AM  
Anyone who hasn't read The Professor And the Madman (and I think it has a different title in the UK), it's a fascinating read about how the OED was compiled.  We tend to think dictionaries were just magicked out of the void and don't realize just how much work went into them.
 
2013-05-05 06:40:14 AM  

Shadow Blasko: skinink: "Forty-nine words in the English language first appeared in a book that may not exist. "
The House of Leaves. Part Deux? I still haven't finished that book, it's so many pages, references, footnotes. And even though I am more than two-thirds through, the story just makes no sense. The Navison Record on its own makes a pretty good horror story (without all the formatting gimmicks). Everything else around it is just confusing.

I still haven't read the first though...

My friends, at least the ones who know my thought processes while engaged in a good book, have warned me multiple times not to read it.

They all say I would love it... but I shouldn't read it.

/huge HUGE fan of Marks sister though..


Read it. I don't know how someone could start it and not finish it. I couldn't put it down.
 
2013-05-05 08:03:06 AM  
This fascinates me, probably more than it should.
 
2013-05-05 08:04:33 AM  

gwenners: jtown: Oh freddled gruntbuggly,


'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.

...



'Twas Brillo, and the G.E. Stoves,
Did Procter-Gamble in the Glade;
All Pillsbury were the Taystee loaves
And in a Minute Maid.

"Beware the Station-Break, my son,
The voice that lulls, the ads that vex!
Beware the Doctors Claim, and shun
That horror called Brand-X!"

He took his Q-Tip'd swab in hand;
Long time the Tension Headache fought--
So Dristan he by a Mercury,
And Bayer-break'd in thought.

http://www76.pair.com/keithlim/jabberwocky/parodies/jabberwhacky.htm l

.
 
Displayed 50 of 78 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report