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(Reuters)   KC-135 catches fire midair and crashes in Kyrgyzstan... Really hope there's no heavy jet crash trifecta   (reuters.com ) divider line
    More: Scary, Kyrgyzstan, U.S., Kyrgyz, Bishkek  
•       •       •

7942 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 May 2013 at 11:45 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-03 09:32:38 AM  
FTFA: "A U.S. military refueling plane exploded in mid air...."

This might be the first time I've seen submitter's headline downplay what actually happened
 
2013-05-03 09:40:26 AM  
Further down in the article, it says '(The plane) caught fire in the air and crashed," said a ministry official'

I didn't want to over-emphasize the "explosion" without using the newsflash tag, so I went subdued.

/subby
 
2013-05-03 09:47:27 AM  
>A civil aviation official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said storm clouds over the region could have caused the explosion, Interfax reported.

I don't see that happening.
 
2013-05-03 11:50:48 AM  
Who ignored the no smoking sign?
 
2013-05-03 11:51:06 AM  

xxmedium: >A civil aviation official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said storm clouds over the region could have caused the explosion, Interfax reported.

I don't see that happening.


Nope.
 
2013-05-03 11:51:14 AM  
At $59 a gallon for renewable jet fuel that KC-135 was worth more than an armored back car.
 
2013-05-03 11:51:53 AM  
It was transporting vital supplies of vowels to the stricken country.
 
2013-05-03 11:52:03 AM  
Armored bank car, that is.
 
2013-05-03 11:52:44 AM  
They won't find survivors
OR much in the way of Identifying pieces.
 
2013-05-03 11:54:41 AM  
Those are old airframes. Lots of possible causes.
 
2013-05-03 11:56:13 AM  

xxmedium: >A civil aviation official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said storm clouds over the region could have caused the explosion, Interfax reported.

I don't see that happening.


i.imgur.com

It was the Sun Queen.
 
2013-05-03 12:00:15 PM  
i48.photobucket.com

Spotted fleeing the scene
 
2013-05-03 12:00:33 PM  

xxmedium: >A civil aviation official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said storm clouds over the region could have caused the explosion, Interfax reported.

I don't see that happening.


Lightning strikes the plane, sets it on fire.

This story will be confusing and leave details out because of translation issues
 
2013-05-03 12:00:44 PM  
Kyrgyzstan

Overloaded with consonants?
 
2013-05-03 12:03:45 PM  
XM607 Falklands Most Daring Raid  is a documentary about the Brits flying Vulcan bombers from England to Ascension Island. The bombers took off from Ascension and flew to the Falklands where they bombed the runway at Port Stanley then flew back to Ascension.  A flight of 12,600 km using 11 refueling tankers.
 
2013-05-03 12:07:16 PM  

Harry Freakstorm: mudpants: Has anyone ever clicked on a "Featured Partner" link ever?

I thought you got Fark Bonus Bucks(tm) when you clicked on them. FBBs are good for gifting Fark subscriptions(*) and Troll Rewards(tm)(**)

(*) Not valid in this dimension or the other seven on either side.
(**) That's me looking at a certain farkette's profile photo with the nip slip. She knows who she is.


/furiously clicking on every farkette profile....
 
2013-05-03 12:15:27 PM  
www.aviationinspector.com

blogs.crikey.com.au

http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae568.cfm

"Since the outer skin of most airplanes is primarily aluminum, which is a very good conductor of electricity; the secret to safe lightning hits is to allow the current to flow through the skin from the point of impact to some other point without interruption or diversion to the interior of the aircraft.

Estimates show that each commercial airliner averages one lighting hit per year but the last crash that was attributed to lightning was in 1967 when the fuel tank exploded, causing the plane to crash. Generally, the first contact with lightning is at an extremity...the nose or a wingtip. As the plane continues to fly through the areas of opposite charges, the lightning transits through the aircraft skin and exits through another extremity point, frequently the tail (as shown by Gauss's Law).


Another related problem with lightning is the effect it can have on computers and flight instruments. Shielding and surge suppressors insure that electrical transients do not threaten the on board avionics and the miles of electrical wiring found in modern aircraft. All components that are vital to the safe operation of commercial aircraft must be certified to meet the stringent regulations of the FAA for planes flying into the United States."
 
2013-05-03 12:23:05 PM  

Do the needful: mudpants: Has anyone ever clicked on a "Featured Partner" link ever?

Are you going to ask this in every thread? So show us on the doll where the Featured Partner Link touched you.


I click on them all just to give Drew a few pennies.
/Doesn't mean I read them.
 
2013-05-03 12:24:31 PM  

xxmedium: >A civil aviation official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said storm clouds over the region could have caused the explosion, Interfax reported.

I don't see that happening.


Storm clouds plus fuel tanker = ????

Somehow I seriously doubt that a KC135 isn't equipped for lighting strike mitigation... what with all the explosive fuel and vapors on-board.
 
2013-05-03 12:28:01 PM  

StopLurkListen: [www.aviationinspector.com image 595x402]

[blogs.crikey.com.au image 372x250]

http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae568.cfm

"Since the outer skin of most airplanes is primarily aluminum, which is a very good conductor of electricity; the secret to safe lightning hits is to allow the current to flow through the skin from the point of impact to some other point without interruption or diversion to the interior of the aircraft.

Estimates show that each commercial airliner averages one lighting hit per year but the last crash that was attributed to lightning was in 1967 when the fuel tank exploded, causing the plane to crash. Generally, the first contact with lightning is at an extremity...the nose or a wingtip. As the plane continues to fly through the areas of opposite charges, the lightning transits through the aircraft skin and exits through another extremity point, frequently the tail (as shown by Gauss's Law).

Another related problem with lightning is the effect it can have on computers and flight instruments. Shielding and surge suppressors insure that electrical transients do not threaten the on board avionics and the miles of electrical wiring found in modern aircraft. All components that are vital to the safe operation of commercial aircraft must be certified to meet the stringent regulations of the FAA for planes flying into the United States."


Cool about "Estimates show that each commercial airliner averages one lighting hit per year"! I figured planes were mostly safe because of their conductive frame which is like a Faraday cage, but I guess with that much electricity all sorts of accidents are possible.
 
2013-05-03 12:31:46 PM  

MarkEC: Do the needful: mudpants: Has anyone ever clicked on a "Featured Partner" link ever?

Are you going to ask this in every thread? So show us on the doll where the Featured Partner Link touched you.

I click on them all just to give Drew a few pennies.
/Doesn't mean I read them.


And it's not like we are being forced to click them either. I have just about every other news link covering the screen with some bullshiat ad that has to be closed before I can read the article. Guess what websites, when you block your webpage with an ad  I just stop going to your website.

Did someone say something about an airplane?
 
2013-05-03 12:32:22 PM  

MarkEC: Do the needful: mudpants: Has anyone ever clicked on a "Featured Partner" link ever?

Are you going to ask this in every thread? So show us on the doll where the Featured Partner Link touched you.

I click on them all just to give Drew a few pennies.
/Doesn't mean I read them.


He's still not going to go out with you.
 
2013-05-03 12:35:23 PM  
2 pilots and a boomer? That sucks :/.
 
2013-05-03 12:39:02 PM  

vudukungfu: They won't find survivors
OR much in the way of Identifying pieces.


Her tail pretty much stayed intact. There's pictures on the internet now. Out of MacDill AFB.

I highly doubt lightening. More likely just some screw up or the fact that KC-135s are old as dirt and replacements aren't out yet thanks to Congress/Boeing playing games.
 
2013-05-03 12:47:18 PM  

Old_Chief_Scott: Those are old airframes. Lots of possible causes.


You say that but they have an excellent safety record. Wikipedia says that they only had 5 accidents in the last 40 years and it has been 14 years since the last one. That's pretty good.
 
2013-05-03 12:52:05 PM  

Kredal: Further down in the article, it says '(The plane) caught fire in the air and crashed," said a ministry official'

I didn't want to over-emphasize the "explosion" without using the newsflash tag, so I went subdued.

/subby


Thanks Kredal for the better headline. I played the trifecta angle too, but I couldn't come up with anything to reflect how sad this was, i.e. two aircraft crashes in the news.
 
2013-05-03 12:52:32 PM  
video plz.
 
2013-05-03 01:01:52 PM  
My daughter knew this team,,she flies a KC-135.  This crew had a full load of fuel and and cargo and they have to climb rapidily over the mountians at this base. I'm sure more will surface. Rest in peace and thank you for serving, we will never forget. Shar
 
2013-05-03 01:05:20 PM  

Kredal: Further down in the article, it says '(The plane) caught fire in the air and crashed," said a ministry official'

I didn't want to over-emphasize the "explosion" without using the newsflash tag, so I went subdued.

/subby


But how often does a flying fuel tanker explode? Explosions are more exciting than a mere fire.
 
2013-05-03 01:07:26 PM  

AirForceVet: Kredal: Further down in the article, it says '(The plane) caught fire in the air and crashed," said a ministry official'

I didn't want to over-emphasize the "explosion" without using the newsflash tag, so I went subdued.

/subby

Thanks Kredal for the better headline. I played the trifecta angle too, but I couldn't come up with anything to reflect how sad this was, i.e. two aircraft crashes in the news.


After submitting this, I realized that this was actually the third US aircraft to crash in the AOR this week, including the MC-12 on Sunday.
 
2013-05-03 01:24:49 PM  

p4p3rm4t3: xxmedium: >A civil aviation official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said storm clouds over the region could have caused the explosion, Interfax reported.

I don't see that happening.

Nope.


Indeed.  I used to be a Crew Chief on F-15's back in the day.  My jet was hit by lightning once.  Saw the point where the lightning entered the empty 600 gallon fueld tank and the point where it left.  No explosion despite there being nothing but fuel vapor in the tanks
 
2013-05-03 01:36:10 PM  
Are there ejection seats in those things?  Curious in case they had a chance to bail.
 
2013-05-03 01:37:03 PM  

ChipNASA: Harry Freakstorm: mudpants: Has anyone ever clicked on a "Featured Partner" link ever?

I thought you got Fark Bonus Bucks(tm) when you clicked on them. FBBs are good for gifting Fark subscriptions(*) and Troll Rewards(tm)(**)

(*) Not valid in this dimension or the other seven on either side.
(**) That's me looking at a certain farkette's profile photo with the nip slip. She knows who she is.

/furiously clicking on every farkette profile....


W...what? Where?!?
 
2013-05-03 01:41:14 PM  
Did it crash due to a sudden loss of vowels?
 
2013-05-03 01:46:05 PM  
poot42- No the KC-135 is not equiped with ejection seats, nor do the pilots have parachutes on. Shar
 
2013-05-03 01:47:12 PM  

poot42: Are there ejection seats in those things?  Curious in case they had a chance to bail.


They eliminated parachutes to save time and money. They figured:
1. These things basically crash once per decade.
2. Parachute training costs lots of time and money and never actually gets used.
3. If the plane is still under control, you're more likely to survive sticking with the plane. If it is out of control, you probably aren't going to be able to jump anyways.
 
2013-05-03 01:47:50 PM  

poot42: Are there ejection seats in those things?  Curious in case they had a chance to bail.


I don't believe so and they may not have known what hit them (I hope). With that much fuel onboard it may have been one of those accidents where things are perfectly routine one moment and gone the next.
 
2013-05-03 02:09:10 PM  

sharbear: poot42- No the KC-135 is not equiped with ejection seats, nor do the pilots have parachutes on. Shar


Jesus Christ, could you imagine trying to bail out of a burning jet at 600MPH?!
 
2013-05-03 02:24:31 PM  

bmihura: StopLurkListen: [www.aviationinspector.com image 595x402]

[blogs.crikey.com.au image 372x250]

http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae568.cfm

"Since the outer skin of most airplanes is primarily aluminum, which is a very good conductor of electricity; the secret to safe lightning hits is to allow the current to flow through the skin from the point of impact to some other point without interruption or diversion to the interior of the aircraft.

Estimates show that each commercial airliner averages one lighting hit per year but the last crash that was attributed to lightning was in 1967 when the fuel tank exploded, causing the plane to crash. Generally, the first contact with lightning is at an extremity...the nose or a wingtip. As the plane continues to fly through the areas of opposite charges, the lightning transits through the aircraft skin and exits through another extremity point, frequently the tail (as shown by Gauss's Law).

Another related problem with lightning is the effect it can have on computers and flight instruments. Shielding and surge suppressors insure that electrical transients do not threaten the on board avionics and the miles of electrical wiring found in modern aircraft. All components that are vital to the safe operation of commercial aircraft must be certified to meet the stringent regulations of the FAA for planes flying into the United States."

Cool about "Estimates show that each commercial airliner averages one lighting hit per year"! I figured planes were mostly safe because of their conductive frame which is like a Faraday cage, but I guess with that much electricity all sorts of accidents are possible.


Then there's positive lightning, which is much more powerful and dangerous.

The conducting metal linkages of the flight controls should have provided a relatively easy route for the electrical discharge to pass through the glider, but metallurgical examination of the debris revealed some strange anomalies. Although one connecting bolt had experienced extreme temperatures of 1000 degrees Celsius, other components had been bizarrely deformed despite receiving much less heat. One hollow control rod was crushed into a solid bar by an intense magnetic field, something that could only have been generated by energies far exceeding those of 'normal' negative lightning."
 
2013-05-03 02:29:54 PM  
 
2013-05-03 02:35:52 PM  

Voiceofreason01: sharbear: poot42- No the KC-135 is not equiped with ejection seats, nor do the pilots have parachutes on. Shar

Jesus Christ, could you imagine trying to bail out of a burning jet at 600MPH?!


How about taking off in near zero visibility with a fully loaded nuclear armed B-52 taking off 15 seconds in front of you?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCnCXAhPDts

Global Shield MITO
 
2013-05-03 03:13:04 PM  

sharbear: poot42- No the KC-135 is not equiped with ejection seats, nor do the pilots have parachutes on. Shar


In case you haven't noticed, but your user name appears above your post, so stop signing your name.
 
2013-05-03 03:16:41 PM  
last time I had a trifecta, I went to the clinic and they gave me some ointment and the next...
oh wait...
nevermind
 
2013-05-03 03:22:54 PM  

Old_Chief_Scott: Those are old airframes. Lots of possible causes.


Like missles.   But that's unpossible because it would imply there's shenanigans going on in the Muslim former Soviet Mumble-stans that the US doesn't know about, and after Boston we can't have that, therefore it un-happened, Citizen.
 
2013-05-03 03:24:14 PM  

Teknowaffle: sharbear: poot42- No the KC-135 is not equiped with ejection seats, nor do the pilots have parachutes on. Shar

In case you haven't noticed, but your user name appears above your post, so stop signing your name.


Ease up, Teknowaffle.  Shar is no noob.  It may just be a personal style thing.
/end of threadjack
 
2013-05-03 03:39:29 PM  

Fribble: Voiceofreason01: sharbear: poot42- No the KC-135 is not equiped with ejection seats, nor do the pilots have parachutes on. Shar

Jesus Christ, could you imagine trying to bail out of a burning jet at 600MPH?!

How about taking off in near zero visibility with a fully loaded nuclear armed B-52 taking off 15 seconds in front of you?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCnCXAhPDts

Global Shield MITO


Wow, are the engines really that dirty?
 
2013-05-03 03:42:01 PM  
Lightning is unlikely but should not be eliminated out of hand. Pan am 214 for example. Designs for lightning impact reduce risks they don't elimnate them entirely. It's a tricky and unpredictable beast.
 
2013-05-03 03:46:33 PM  
www.fxguide.com
 
2013-05-03 04:16:05 PM  
Thanks poot 42.  Today is a rough day for us, my daughter is attending the memorial for the pilots that crashed last weekend and then she hears about her friends today.  She'll be deploying on her third mission in days and we are very proud of her.
She is an excellent pilot, officer, professional, and leader and I'm proud to be her mom. She is putting her life on the line for our freedom. So I proudly sign my name, the mother of a KC-135 pilot. Support our troops! Sharron   (Tecknowaffle, I have no hard feelings, it isn't worth it.)
 
2013-05-03 04:30:33 PM  

sharbear: Thanks poot 42.  Today is a rough day for us, my daughter is attending the memorial for the pilots that crashed last weekend and then she hears about her friends today.  She'll be deploying on her third mission in days and we are very proud of her.
She is an excellent pilot, officer, professional, and leader and I'm proud to be her mom. She is putting her life on the line for our freedom. So I proudly sign my name, the mother of a KC-135 pilot. Support our troops! Sharron   (Tecknowaffle, I have no hard feelings, it isn't worth it.)


I understand that community is pretty tight. Best wishes for your daughter. I understand and applaud your pride.
/CDN Army pilot's brat
 
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