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(Pop Matters)   In defense of the music collector   (popmatters.com) divider line 76
    More: Spiffy, Black Crowes, history of music, digital copy  
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3067 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 02 May 2013 at 12:05 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-02 12:30:46 PM
I wish I had time to expound on my life-long hobby of navel gazing.
 
2013-05-02 12:33:11 PM
Blah blah Black Crows...

And that's when I decided to not waste my time.

/Aware of the irony of wasting time posting this.
//slashies
 
2013-05-02 12:39:47 PM

Bslim: Blah blah Black Crows...

And that's when I decided to not waste my time.


It's not even about the Black Crowes.  It's someone waxing poetic (pun intended) over being an obsessive-compulsive music collector.
 
2013-05-02 12:48:24 PM
These days, there's no time to fall in love with entire albums because as soon as opinions are formed, we move on to another fix, another song, another artist. Listening to 10 or 14 songs consecutively by a single group or artist and then immediately pressing repeat to do it all again is compromised by the popularity of streaming services that focus more on singles and viral hits than they do complete stories or elongated snapshots of time.

Listening to full albums is incredibly easy on Spotify and Grooveshark and Bandcamp and some others (though not Pandora), much easier than slogging to the record store.  There's some nostalgia for the free time of the younger years in this article too.

but to me, the Pandoras and Spotifys of the world are nothing more than whore houses, ready to accommodate fringe enthusiasts whenever they find themselves longing for a quick connection.

He's also afraid to like music that others don't.
 
2013-05-02 12:49:18 PM
I collect MP3s.
 
2013-05-02 12:54:27 PM
I always thought of myself more as a collector.  But recently I started using Spotify and am now enjoying the opportunity to hear almost anything I can think of, allowing me to discover all kinds of music that I may have never encountered otherwise. I see no problem with this.  And if I like something enough, I can purchase it for myself anyway.
 
2013-05-02 12:57:16 PM
I can appreciate the whole "actually owning a physical copy of music" when the accompanying artwork/liner notes/other included sh*t is actually worthwhile, interesting, and adds in some valuable way to the music itself.

Yet, as I've gotten older, I like to actually derive meaning more on my own accord as opposed to piecing together "clues" as to the songwriter's intent and inspiration. And, I have like, stuff to do, and don't exactly have hours to spend anymore on extensive contemplation of either my navel, or someone else's.
 
2013-05-02 01:00:56 PM

schpanky: I always thought of myself more as a collector.  But recently I started using Spotify and am now enjoying the opportunity to hear almost anything I can think of, allowing me to discover all kinds of music that I may have never encountered otherwise. I see no problem with this.  And if I like something enough, I can purchase it for myself anyway.


Exactly what I came here to write.

12349876: Listening to full albums is incredibly easy on Spotify


I kept thinking this when reading this and other similar articles.  Do these people not realize this is possible?
 
2013-05-02 01:08:13 PM

Bslim: Blah blah Black Crows...

And that's when I decided to not waste my time.

/Aware of the irony of wasting time posting this.
//slashies


All you're really missing is this:

"the Pandoras and Spotifys of the world are nothing more than whore houses, ready to accommodate fringe enthusiasts whenever they find themselves longing for a quick connection"

sounds like a well balanced individual
 
2013-05-02 01:08:24 PM
The worst thing about this is that Google keeps expecting me to figure out which album I want to listen to by the cover.
 
2013-05-02 01:11:02 PM

schpanky: I always thought of myself more as a collector.  But recently I started using Spotify and am now enjoying the opportunity to hear almost anything I can think of, allowing me to discover all kinds of music that I may have never encountered otherwise. I see no problem with this.  And if I like something enough, I can purchase it for myself anyway.


Agreed. These things aren't mutually exclusive. There's room enough for both. I stream Spotify and Songza at work. I listen to my music collection at home, which has been growing recently because of those streaming services.
 
2013-05-02 01:11:25 PM
Why are music and film buffs prone to being absolute elitist douchebags?
 
2013-05-02 01:12:26 PM
I collect music, and I cannot understand how people can only use Youtube, Spotify, and Pandora. I want to OWN my music, not just have it somewhere where I can't always access.
 
2013-05-02 01:17:58 PM

GarySZ: I kept thinking this when reading this and other similar articles. Do these people not realize this is possible?


My assumption (of their real argument) is that by not owning the music, you're missing something integral to fully understanding it. And, this is on top of waxing nostalgic on the pre-MP3 days.

Sure, when I was 12, being nowhere near as perceptive nor intelligent as I am now, it took me hours upon hours to gain some understanding (or what I thought was an understanding) of, say, an album like The Piper at the Gates of Dawn. This included constant reading of the lyrics, etc. Now as an adult? I can pick up things I completely missed while multitasking in mere minutes.
 
2013-05-02 01:21:47 PM
Like Madonna said,

"Poor is the man
whose pleasure depends
on permission... from another."

Possibly the only intelligent thing I ever heard from her.

If you're streaming or storing your music in the cloud, you're only a whim away...

..(a whim away- a whim away)...

...from being denied access.
 
2013-05-02 01:22:32 PM

schpanky: I always thought of myself more as a collector.  But recently I started using Spotify and am now enjoying the opportunity to hear almost anything I can think of, allowing me to discover all kinds of music that I may have never encountered otherwise. I see no problem with this.  And if I like something enough, I can purchase it for myself anyway.


I know, the writer is a d-bag.  Had he done any research he would know that spotify pays the artist money when you listen to their song/album.  I can't remember the last time I downloaded/stole music off the internet.  If it's there for me to stream, and I have to listen to some 15 sec commercial everyonceinawhile, fine.
 
2013-05-02 01:35:15 PM

LeroyBourne: schpanky: I always thought of myself more as a collector.  But recently I started using Spotify and am now enjoying the opportunity to hear almost anything I can think of, allowing me to discover all kinds of music that I may have never encountered otherwise. I see no problem with this.  And if I like something enough, I can purchase it for myself anyway.

I know, the writer is a d-bag.  Had he done any research he would know that spotify pays the artist money when you listen to their song/album.  I can't remember the last time I downloaded/stole music off the internet.  If it's there for me to stream, and I have to listen to some 15 sec commercial everyonceinawhile, fine.


They get a fraction of a cent
 
2013-05-02 01:36:41 PM

HAMMERTOE: Like Madonna said,

"Poor is the man
whose pleasure depends
on permission... from another."

Possibly the only intelligent thing I ever heard from her.

If you're streaming or storing your music in the cloud, you're only a whim away...

..(a whim away- a whim away)...

...from being denied access.


"Get into the groove
Boy you've got to prove your love to me"

Madonna
 
2013-05-02 01:36:49 PM

GarySZ: I kept thinking this when reading this and other similar articles. Do these people not realize this is possible?


It's the only way I listen to Spotify.  I'll search a band and album and set the whole album to play.  Now I don't usually last long on it because I mostly use Spotify for new to me music from anthology/review sites I like, but when I find something that's intriguing, I listen front to back.  Probably helps I'm largely into progressive music, both broadly and specifically.

/specific being the style of the 70s heavyweights
//broad being anything that pushes convention
 
2013-05-02 01:39:00 PM

12349876: but when I find something that's intriguing, I listen front to back.


and I should add if the intrigue turns into love, buy it, and then mostly listen on my hard drive or Amazon.
 
2013-05-02 01:47:03 PM

moothemagiccow: LeroyBourne: schpanky: I always thought of myself more as a collector.  But recently I started using Spotify and am now enjoying the opportunity to hear almost anything I can think of, allowing me to discover all kinds of music that I may have never encountered otherwise. I see no problem with this.  And if I like something enough, I can purchase it for myself anyway.

I know, the writer is a d-bag.  Had he done any research he would know that spotify pays the artist money when you listen to their song/album.  I can't remember the last time I downloaded/stole music off the internet.  If it's there for me to stream, and I have to listen to some 15 sec commercial everyonceinawhile, fine.

They get a fraction of a cent


Shiat adds up, I know it's not much, but it's a lot better than straight up stealing.  Plus, the 'related artist' option is actually very useful for when I'm looking for new stuff to listen to.  Pandora is farking garbage for that.
/lars, is that you?
 
2013-05-02 01:51:49 PM

Bslim: "Get into the groove
Boy you've got to prove... PLEASE DEPOSIT $5 FOR THE NEXT TEN MINUTES, OR ENTER YOUR CREDIT CARD NUMBER AT THE TONE...

"
 
2013-05-02 01:54:50 PM
trotsky 2013-05-02 01:11:25 PM
Why are music and film buffs prone to being absolute elitist douchebags?

Because the pride of building a collection lies in what is cut, what is rejected. When you see that elitism, see it as sincerity. He has worked hard to refine his taste until it is superior to yours. If you have worked harder, rub his nose in it.
 
2013-05-02 01:55:20 PM

LeroyBourne: moothemagiccow: LeroyBourne: schpanky: I always thought of myself more as a collector.  But recently I started using Spotify and am now enjoying the opportunity to hear almost anything I can think of, allowing me to discover all kinds of music that I may have never encountered otherwise. I see no problem with this.  And if I like something enough, I can purchase it for myself anyway.

I know, the writer is a d-bag.  Had he done any research he would know that spotify pays the artist money when you listen to their song/album.  I can't remember the last time I downloaded/stole music off the internet.  If it's there for me to stream, and I have to listen to some 15 sec commercial everyonceinawhile, fine.

They get a fraction of a cent

Shiat adds up, I know it's not much, but it's a lot better than straight up stealing.  Plus, the 'related artist' option is actually very useful for when I'm looking for new stuff to listen to.  Pandora is farking garbage for that.
/lars, is that you?


It's not like musicians make a shiatload of money off sales, either, but the "I'll go see your concert when you spend thousands to come visit my podunk town on the other side of the world" is retarded
 
2013-05-02 01:55:25 PM
i don't use pandora or spotify, and i'm not entirely sure how they even work.  i don't like streaming stuff online if i can just download it once and listen to it when i'm not on the internet.  and i always listen to full albums too, so maybe i'm just weird.  usually my music collection process is as follows: 1) hear about new band or album, 2) listen to clips on amazon to see if i want to buy it  3) download from pirate bay if i'm not sure  4) buy the mp3s or buy the physical album from amazon depending on the band.  all my music is on my computer, but i also have a 300-cd changer in my living room for most of my favorite albums.  i'm also weird because i don't have any portable music players like an ipod or whatever.
 
2013-05-02 02:00:52 PM
...Despite the video garnering millions of hits on YouTube, Astley has earned almost no money from the meme, receiving only US$12 in royalties from YouTube for his performance share.

wiki
 
2013-05-02 02:04:04 PM
GarySZ:12349876: Listening to full albums is incredibly easy on Spotify

I kept thinking this when reading this and other similar articles.  Do these people not realize this is possible?


I've found that most of the time when people are critical of a piece of ubiquitous technology, they really haven't used it.
 
2013-05-02 02:06:39 PM

magnificentfarkwad: I collect music, and I cannot understand how people can only use Youtube, Spotify, and Pandora. I want to OWN my music, not just have it somewhere where I can't always access.


Oddly, Iisten to music on Spotify and I cannot understand why people would want to collect music.  I want to LISTEN to my music, not have a physical copy somewhere that can easily be lost, deleted, or misplaced.
 
2013-05-02 02:12:36 PM

enderthexenocide: i don't use pandora or spotify, and i'm not entirely sure how they even work.  i don't like streaming stuff online if i can just download it once and listen to it when i'm not on the internet.  and i always listen to full albums too, so maybe i'm just weird.  usually my music collection process is as follows: 1) hear about new band or album, 2) listen to clips on amazon to see if i want to buy it  3) download from pirate bay if i'm not sure  4) buy the mp3s or buy the physical album from amazon depending on the band.  all my music is on my computer, but i also have a 300-cd changer in my living room for most of my favorite albums.  i'm also weird because i don't have any portable music players like an ipod or whatever.


Here's my music process: 1) Hear about a new band or album, 2) Listen to the song or albumn on Spotify, 3) Add it to a play list if I like it.  It takes like 30 seconds of work, not counting the time it takes to actually listen to the song.  Your way just sounds so... exhausting.

If I want to listen to it at home, I can plug in my phone to a really nice set of speakers I have or just use the TV (Roku has a nice app for it).

If I want to listen to it on my phone in the unlikely event that I'm away from the Internet, my phone automatically downloads a copy of anything on my playlist.
 
2013-05-02 02:14:25 PM
FTFA:
Thus the appeal of taking pride in one's own collection has not just been diminished; it's become archaic. I, for one, have been asked several times by a wide range of people, "why I still have so many CDs" or "when I'll just sell them off in favor of downloading the music onto my computer." My answer to the latter question has forever been and will always be the same: "Why would anybody want to do that?"


Yet another article in the genre of "old guy who fears and doesn't understand change". I want to explain to him that can carefully curate a music collection that is digital as well.

I am a music collector. I have eschewed all physical media for well over a decade now. Back when I worked at a record store my CD collection certainly ballooned, but once everything started going digital I quickly started converting my CD's to high bit rate mp3's, and started downloading mp3's for the stuff I had bought on tape and vinyl. I've very carefully gotten the metadata added to everything in my collection (even album covers embedded for roughly 99.5% of my mp3s), and have all the files themselves arranged by artist and then album.

Today my mp3 collection is over 250 gigs, and works out to something like 6 months of continuous, non-repetitive play. Admittedly, I'm a computer nerd, but it's never been hard to find HDD space for them. Hard drives were smaller when I started collecting, but as my collection grew so did disk space per dollar. Today I can buy a 2 TB drive for $99, which will hold my collection roughly 8 times over. So I not only have my entire collection easily stored on my personal fileserver (7 TB of space currently) but I also have a full backup of the whole library on another drive, in case anything every happened to that machine... even though those drives are in a redundant RAID for a first line of safety.

I've got a whole bunch of friends who do the same exact thing, though most of them don't have quite as large or organized a collection as I... One of my friends has me beat though. He used to work for a big search engine company and apparently for a while all the network engineers had a shared folder they pooled all their music collections in to. He's got around 2 TB of music in his collection! He likes to put it on repeat - the whole thing - and just let it play in the background while he's doing stuff. Another friend of ours wants to download a ton of commercials and sneak them in to his music folder so they pop up randomly like he's listening to the radio.

Streaming services simply don't appeal to me. I listen to music all day long in my office... Streaming services are blocked, and it's good they are because our bandwidth at work SUCKS, and is always going to suck. My cellphone also gets absolutely horrid reception in my office, so even if I wanted to stream over my cellphone all day (hooray for unlimited data with Sprint!) I can't. Even when I'm home..... Meh. Once in a blue moon I'll fire up Pandora in hopes of finding a new artist similar to the stuff I like, but that's really rare. I have never had too much trouble finding out about new music, and now that my collection is so organized it isn't that hard to drop new music in to it and have it forever, regardless of how much bandwidth I have or not. That way I also get to use the songs as ringtones and such too!

Streaming is a great deal for the record labels though... No more pesky worrying about fair use if they can trick everyone in to renting their music from now on instead of buying.
 
2013-05-02 02:14:40 PM

magnificentfarkwad: I collect music, and I cannot understand how people can only use Youtube, Spotify, and Pandora. I want to OWN my music, not just have it somewhere where I can't always access.


I also have a library of LPs, tapes, CDs, and MP3s but still use YouTube, Spotify, and Pandora to hear either music that's new to me or the "guilty pleasure" song that's okay to listen to occasionally but not worth taking up space on my hard drive.
 
2013-05-02 02:16:10 PM
I was gonna make a jpg that said something like "stop doing what I don't do" and did this search:

record collection

and then I realized I do think that is cool. I would love to have a collection like that...but times change and I have two kids and a wife and mortgage payment. All excuses I guess...but we can't all take our hobbies to the fullest.

If you like collecting records and having the physical media then great. I realize he writes for a music site but not everybody is going to care like you do.

I used to think I would never stop buying discs, I too love the art and what not, but things got easier and you don't listen to the artwork. And the days of sitting down and ************** and just looking at the art while the music plays are few and far between. I still buy music and collect here and there, but come on man, people get into different things.
Now, if my job was to be a professional music listener, then yes sir. All day everyday.
 
2013-05-02 02:23:33 PM
What does this guy have against whores?
 
2013-05-02 02:25:14 PM
There are all sorts of reasons to prefer owning your music. Sound quality is one. Streaming doesn't sound bad, but it's not as good as it can be. It doesn't matter on an iPod or smartphone, but is readily apparent on a nicer headphones and speakers. Secondly, owned music isn't dependent on your internet connection or the behavior of the site itself. Also, owning music on your phone means you're not wasting your data allowance (mine is 2GB, fark you very much, Verizon).

Anyway, the writer of this piece is awful. He could have made the same point in three paragraphs.

meanmutton: I want to LISTEN to my music, not have a physical copy somewhere that can easily be lost, deleted, or misplaced.


Well, I just treat my music like all my important data: backups. One copy on the laptop itself, another copy on an external drive, and a third drive kept offsite in case my house is burglarized or burns down. I'm already doing backups of legal and financial data, images of my OS, and all that, so it's no trouble to copy the music, too
 
2013-05-02 02:36:52 PM
so it is kind of like "well, that is cool you found that band you like, but you would be a lot cooler if actually physically owned the record, man, like I do."
 
kab
2013-05-02 02:52:57 PM
"Music subscriptions will eventually replace music collections because the digital universe is oriented against the idea of ownership - because music ownership is itself the eight-track of the Internet."

Good luck with this assessment.

If I'm just as capable as ever of seeking out and acquiring music I enjoy, what makes you think a middle man streaming service deserves a nickel from me?  (especially since I know how little is going back to the artist).
 
2013-05-02 02:54:07 PM
mongbiohazard:

Yet another article in the genre of "old guy who fears and doesn't understand change". I want to explain to him that can carefully curate a music collection that is digital as well.

I am a music collector. I have eschewed all physical media for well over a decade now. Back when I worked at a record store my CD collection certainly ballooned, but once everything started going digital I quickly started converting my CD's to high bit rate mp3's, and started downloading mp3's for the stuff I had bought on tape and vinyl. I've very carefully gotten the metadata added to everything in my collection (even album covers embedded for roughly 99.5% of my mp3s), and have all the files themselves arranged by artist and then album.

Today my mp3 collection is over 250 gigs, and works out to something like 6 months of continuous, non-repetitive play. Admittedly, I'm a computer nerd, but it's never been hard to find HDD space for them. Hard drives were smaller when I started collecting, but as my collection grew so did disk space per dollar. Today I can buy a 2 TB drive for $99, which will hold my collection roughly 8 times over. So I not only have my entire collection easily stored on my personal fileserver (7 TB of space currently) but I also have a full backup of the whole library on another drive, in case anything every happened to that machine... even though those drives are in a redundant RAID for a first line of safety.

I've got a whole bunch of friends who do the same exact thing, though most of them don't have quite as large or organized a collection as I... One ...



Check, Check, and double check - at 3.5TB, myself. Metatag, file, back-the-whole-damned-thing-up on the Fort Knox drives. Keep a file of ARCHIVE THIS for your quarterly archive dump.

Everybody who says "I need a physical copy" hasn't ever had a SERIOUS farking shirt-ton of music. I still have FIVE xerox paper boxes full of carefully stacked tapes I haven't digitized yet, and over the course of time I've probably shuffled off 20-30 boxes of the same size in CD format.

Because, Really...

1) The digital format is the Ultimate equalizer. You have 3 different formats of physical media, and you have a 12-inch EP release that had an Incredible B-side... you will Never, ever hear it again. Too much junk to sort through when you're looking for something to listen to. In digital, it's Artist files, and Album subfiles. Time to rediscover "Time Lapse in Milton Keyes" accidentally on physical - probably nigh impossible. On digital, it's right up there with the major releases when you open the artist.

2) SPACE - the final fronteer. Holy Mother. Have you ever given any serious thought to the amount of space you need to spread this crap out across to make it even semi-useable? One jewelbox is a half inch wide (just measured). 24 discs a linear foot, give or take an inch. 100 discs - 4 feet. 200 discs - 8 feet.
1000 discs - 40 linear feet. And that's just width - the thin end. lessee...five inches tall..

So - 1000 discs = 8 rows of 5 foot shelving, six inches high a piece... so a four foot by five foot wall. For content I can easily fit on a wallet sized mini drive, if not a healthy thumb drive.

3) Physical - No Big Deal. Honestly, I was very impressed with myself when I had a mongo collection of media, until the size of the collection hit a tipping point between "Wow - how cool is that" and "Jesus, now you just look obsessive and ridiculous." After a certain point, the physical constraint becomes a burden.
Imagine having eight racks of 250 cassettes hanging on your walls. Just cassette tapes. Either you farking love showing off your pitiful cassette boxes as wall art, or you have let OCD get in the way of good sense. You've become a hoarder.

I had 'em. Gone now. HDD, Scroll, click, play.

Own it? I do. Protected? It is. Useable? Eminently.
 
kab
2013-05-02 03:05:11 PM

moothemagiccow: It's not like musicians make a shiatload of money off sales, either, but the "I'll go see your concert when you spend thousands to come visit my podunk town on the other side of the world" is retarded


Yes, it is.  Not to mention that some acts rely solely on sales, seeing as they don't tour, or play live anywhere.. and that bands don't get all the money from a ticket sale either.

I find that the whole "I support bands by seeing them live / buying t-shirts" is thrown around more as a piracy excuse than a legitimate support theory.

In this society, music is a disposable expectation, rather than an appreciated art form, and the average listeners behavior towards it reflects that.
 
kab
2013-05-02 03:09:48 PM

perigee: Own it? I do. Protected? It is. Useable? Eminently.


Purchased it all?
Think it's all actually worth listening to?
 
2013-05-02 03:13:36 PM

kab: I find that the whole "I support bands by seeing them live / buying t-shirts" is thrown around more as a piracy excuse than a legitimate support theory.


In some cases sure, but there's a difference between saying that in regards to, say, The Black Keys, who tour extensively and have robust merchandising avenues, and, Eilífr Goðrúnarson's Nutsack, an Icelandic thrash metal post-punk shoegaze quartet who only record their music onto 8" volcanic rocks and refuse to perform live due to stage fright.
 
2013-05-02 03:17:38 PM
Wow, I feel... ashamed and inferior. I think that's what the author was going for.
 
2013-05-02 03:18:55 PM

kab: perigee: Own it? I do. Protected? It is. Useable? Eminently.

Purchased it all?
Think it's all actually worth listening to?


as a music collector with 3 or 4 hundred gigs of music, I have TONS of stuff I either never or will never listen to.
 
2013-05-02 03:23:06 PM
My biggest problem with Spotify (and previous experience with Rhapsody) are the songs they don't have.  I constantly go look for a specific song or album and it's not available, and I am not talking about some obscure indy bands.  Tool, the new Rhianna, Def Leppard, Guns n Roses, Zepplin etc... they might have some music available but not the song I want to hear, and the worst part is that I typically have the CD sitting at my house.
 
2013-05-02 03:27:30 PM

frepnog: kab: perigee: Own it? I do. Protected? It is. Useable? Eminently.

Purchased it all?
Think it's all actually worth listening to?

as a music collector with 3 or 4 hundred gigs of music, I have TONS of stuff I either never or will never listen to.


then why i have it?

I went through my playlist a few months ago and deleted all the sh*t I never want to hear again. it makes the random work so much better. If I have to skip a song it is my fault.
 
2013-05-02 03:34:03 PM
I enjoy Spotify and usually put on a full album or just click on an artist and let it go.  My problem is the severe lack of some artists, which I understand is their choice.  If I want to hear The Nice, King Crimson, Fish or some other prog bands I cannot use streaming services.  My personal collection of Porcupine Tree cds dwarfs what is available on Spotify. My suspicion is that this is an issue with other niche genres as well.  I had the same problem with cassettes and cds when they were introduced.  A lot of the stuff in my vinyl collection was never released on tape or cd unless it was a $35 Japanese import.

But, as others have said, digitizing my collection makes all the sense in the world.  I don't think I'll ever fill the 2TB drive, and it sure makes it easier to listen to the vinyl once it's on the hard drive.  Easier to back up as well.
 
2013-05-02 03:39:35 PM
I rue the day I sold my LP collection ... over a woman, no less, who is no longer around. In my personal history of dumb moves at 41 years of age, its right up there, top ten. Still have my 45s though, so I've got that going for me, which is nice.
 
2013-05-02 03:43:13 PM

trotsky: Why are music and film buffs prone to being absolute elitist douchebags?


You nailed it. I was shocked the author didn't have a neckbeard.
 
2013-05-02 03:43:25 PM

boonfarker: I rue the day I sold my LP collection ... over a woman, no less, who is no longer around. In my personal history of dumb moves at 41 years of age, its right up there, top ten. Still have my 45s though, so I've got that going for me, which is nice.


farm7.static.flickr.com

NOOOOOOO. that sucks!
 
2013-05-02 03:53:26 PM
I took a slightly different path with my music consumption. I set up an internet stream with around 1500 titles that I love and connect to it through my phone in the car, and over a micropowered FM transmitter around the house. I'm ex-radio so I used my now worthless career knowledge to set up my rotations, artist separation and whatnot, and the clockwheels rotate through the genres and eras about flawlessly. I never know what's coming up next, but I know I'll like it. AAC+ quality and it sounds damned good. Plus, I can listen anywhere I can get an internet connection.
 
2013-05-02 03:58:53 PM

perigee: Check, Check, and double check - at 3.5TB, myself. Metatag, file, back-the-whole-damned-thing-up on the Fort Knox drives. Keep a file of ARCHIVE THIS for your quarterly archive dump.

Everybody who says "I need a physical copy" hasn't ever had a SERIOUS farking shirt-ton of music. I still have FIVE xerox paper boxes full of carefully stacked tapes I haven't digitized yet, and over the course of time I've probably shuffled off 20-30 boxes of the same size in CD format.


Seriously. I have a whole bunch of plastic bins in my basement, still full of CD's. It's a lot of wasted space at this point, since I will never use a CD to listen to music ever again. Some day when I'm bored I'll drag them to my local used record shop and sell them all off...

Is that 3.5 TB all music? And is it FLAC or MP3? If it's music, and not FLAC, then that's a pretty damn impressive collection. Impressive if it's FLAC too, just a little less so!

My 7 TB of server space is getting pretty close to capacity at this point. I've filled about 6.5 TB with movies and TV shows. The 250 gigs of music in my music archive is chump change compared to that stuff... Building that server was one of the best things I've ever done. It runs 24/7, and runs my DNS updater for my domain, runs my Plex server and runs my FTP server. And with Plex (and a few convenient shortcuts on my wife's laptop's desktop) even my technolgically challenged wife can watch any of that media over the LAN in our house any time she likes on her tablet or laptop. It's like magic. Personally I don't even watch TV anymore. If my wife didn't like college football (ewww, sports, gross) I'd cancel the cable package and just have internet.
 
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