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(Quad City Times)   Turkey slaughterhouse that employed mentally handicapped men and allowed them to live in squalor while taking 90% of their wages found guilty of varied crimes, ordered to pay the men $240 million   (qctimes.com) divider line 31
    More: Followup, found guilty, Atalissa, burden of proof, development director, West Liberty  
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8995 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 May 2013 at 8:48 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-05-02 09:32:12 AM
3 votes:
This Henry character should die in prison.
2013-05-02 09:30:29 AM
3 votes:
The problem is none of the companies executives and/or stockholders will be facing jailtime over this.  Yet if a store clerk sells cigs to a minor while working for a company he/she is arrested and not just fined like company executives get.
2013-05-02 09:29:18 AM
3 votes:

espiaboricua: p>WTFDYW: I can't farking believe this went under the radar for so long. I hope Henry's has the assetts to be forced to pay each of these men all that they were awarded.

The owner of the company has already said that they don't have the money to pay because they closed the company (coincidentially, while this case was being investigated)... so, my most sincere and non-snarky wish of good luck to the EEOC trying to recover that much money from them.


Okay, a couple of things that may, or may not, have been mentioned in the story (the QC Times keeps rewriting and relinking):

1. This is not the first fine levied against Henry.
2. There are already almost $2 million in fines from the State of Iowa.
3. Henry shut down his Iowa operation and ran back to Texas making it impossible for the State of Iowa to collect.

I'm hoping that EEOC can seize everything that Henry has hidden in Texas.
2013-05-02 05:56:30 PM
2 votes:

nekom: Don't ANY of these people have family looking out for them?


Clearly not many of them had "family" who cared enough to notice and act.

Which is we shouldn't setup a system that requires "family" to bear the sole responsibility for people with a legal disability (including children) in the first place -- not everyone has a family that is able or willing provide (potentially life-long) support services when they're in need, and some of the people have terrible families that will actively exploit them given the chance.
2013-05-02 01:12:07 PM
2 votes:
To bad they couldn't sentence him to 5 yrs living and working under the same conditions.
2013-05-02 12:28:03 PM
2 votes:

randomjsa: FlashHarry: clearly we need less regulation!

Don't be inept. Regulations were being violated nine ways from Sunday having more or less regulations would change nothing for the victims in this case.


Maybe some FUNDING for enforcement, then? It's an old trick politicians use: Pass feel-good laws without the budgetary back-up.

We can't continue to cut taxes and expect our national standards to remain above Bangladesh's forever.
2013-05-02 10:39:04 AM
2 votes:

WTFDYW: I can't farking believe this went under the radar for so long. I hope Henry's has the assetts to be forced to pay each of these men all that they were awarded.


He's already pleading poverty. He'll shut the business down, blame it on the court case, and people who worked at the place will be unemployed. Then he'll cry about the job creators being persecuted by big government regulations.
2013-05-02 10:35:05 AM
2 votes:

wickedragon: 7.5M$?
Now THATS retarded

Sure, bad and wrong and all that jazz, but how the hell does bad and wrong and shiat work out to be 7.5 Million per person?

I'm never going to understand american law or ethics am I?


Punitive damages.  And in this particular case, I think it's proper.
2013-05-02 10:16:03 AM
2 votes:
One of my jobs is working with adult mentally disabled men (the youngest guy is ~50, the oldest ~75). I get extremely frustrated with the system they're in. Many go to workshops and do actual work, but there's never money for me to take them to breakfast or even get them a candy bar. I end up spending a huge chunk of my paycheck on candy and colored pencils and Big Boy. I have no access to their financial records, but something seems off. They are kept clean and have a really nice house, which is awesome. Their families rarely call or visit. Many of their guardians are siblings and I'm pretty sure that's where their money is going.

The only things I can do is take them to free stuff, like the senior citizens do a big band performance at a high school and sometimes I'll go to the museum, bat my eyelashes and can sneak them in for free (thanx front desk guy at the DIA).

Stuff like this makes me feel terrible and frustrated. I really hope these guys get taken care of, but I'm pretty sure they'll never benefit from that money. Goddamnitsomuch.
2013-05-02 10:09:51 AM
2 votes:
This is apalling.  Human piece of garbage.  If you read some of the related articles you get a better picture of the guy.  He even goes so far as to blame the families of the disabled men for not visiting and noticing the problems themselves, saying they should feel guilty.
2013-05-02 09:33:36 AM
2 votes:

gja: liam76: randomjsa: FlashHarry: clearly we need less regulation!

Don't be inept. Regulations were being violated nine ways from Sunday having more or less regulations would change nothing for the victims in this case.

funding to enforce current regulation would help, how do you feel on that?

Show me a solid citation whereby funding has been cut


Where did I say funding had been cut?

Now it is possible there are records that show that this house and the workers were investigated by the appropriate agencies, and maybe they dropped the ball.  However I am guessing there was never money to have peopel check up on the work and home conditions of these pople.  Don;t you htink more funding woudl help that?
2013-05-02 09:01:02 AM
2 votes:
Seriously, there needs to be a Constitutional admendment de-criminalizing compassion.

When corporate persons are told their only purpose is to return as much money to investors and not to be financially distracted by doing the right thing, there's something really wrong the priorities of the legal system.
2013-05-02 08:59:44 AM
2 votes:

Fade2black: randomjsa: FlashHarry: clearly we need less regulation!

Don't be inept. Regulations were being violated nine ways from Sunday having more or less regulations would change nothing for the victims in this case.

Pretty much this. Don't be retarded, Libtard.


When most laypeople invoke regulation, they are envisioning those regulations being enforced. So, just assume they mean regulations + enforcement. You could point out they probably mean heightened enforcement and more inspectors, or just be a douche. Your call.
2013-05-02 08:11:51 AM
2 votes:
I can't farking believe this went under the radar for so long. I hope Henry's has the assetts to be forced to pay each of these men all that they were awarded.
2013-05-02 06:00:23 PM
1 votes:

WTFDYW: I can't farking believe this went under the radar for so long. I hope Henry's has the assetts to be forced to pay each of these men all that they were awarded.


FTFA: "Henry's, which also does business as Hill Country Farms, hasn't paid $1.6 million in previous federal and state fines related to the men, according to records."

so these guys have a judgement but little chance of getting any real money.
2013-05-02 03:42:59 PM
1 votes:

drb9: Madame Ovary: I'm surprised how quick farkers are to demonize the families. It is exhausting caring for someone with severe disabilities. A life commitment and then some. These men are old. They were raised when disability, especially developmental disability, was seriously stigmatized in the community.  Doctors would tell families to send their dd children away and forget about them, and they would.  If parents could do that, it would be even easier for siblings.

I can't find an anti-bullying documentary from the 1950s.  Mom calls the police because a group of high school boys are bullying the woman's dd son who is playing in the front yard. He is riding a tire horse. Anyway know the psa I'm talking about?

I'm not demonizing the families.  Actually, maybe I am.  I believe that many/most of them were quite content to have their relative out of their house and not "exhausting" them.  Not being a "life commitment."  I believe they were so happy to have this be the case that they turned a blind eye to the living and working conditions.  (They are in good company, by the way.  The Kennedys did it to Rosemary.)  And then, when someone told the relatives that they could turn around and profit from this situation, they did what every right-thinking American would do--they greedily accepted this approach.


Wasn't it a family member that identified the abuse?   Anyways, there is some historical truth to what you're saying, but you really can't speculate.  The only hard facts we have in this case surround an evil old man.
2013-05-02 12:45:49 PM
1 votes:

Madame Ovary: megarian: One of my jobs is working with adult mentally disabled men (the youngest guy is ~50, the oldest ~75). I get extremely frustrated with the system they're in. Many go to workshops and do actual work, but there's never money for me to take them to breakfast or even get them a candy bar. I end up spending a huge chunk of my paycheck on candy and colored pencils and Big Boy. I have no access to their financial records, but something seems off. They are kept clean and have a really nice house, which is awesome. Their families rarely call or visit. Many of their guardians are siblings and I'm pretty sure that's where their money is going.

The only things I can do is take them to free stuff, like the senior citizens do a big band performance at a high school and sometimes I'll go to the museum, bat my eyelashes and can sneak them in for free (thanx front desk guy at the DIA).

Stuff like this makes me feel terrible and frustrated. I really hope these guys get taken care of, but I'm pretty sure they'll never benefit from that money. Goddamnitsomuch.

Who pays for their food and housing? I have a small child as of yet but I've heard that for adults all federal money goes to the agency that provides residence.  Each resident then would only get like $50/month spending money. Rich and poor get the same unless families have set up a special needs trust to pay for the extras - favorite popsicles, an Icee from 7-11, movie, etc. Special needs trusts are a fairly new thing. Clients in the age range you are talking about would have had a tough upbringing with fewer opportunities than our children today. It takes a big heart to do what you are doing. Hats off to you!

I would guess in the this abuse case that families drove over on Sunday to take their loved one out to lunch but never questioned conditions because their loved one was clean and happy to see them. That is what I hope at least, some minimal amount of contact.

Some institutions/group homes require residents to sleep there or they are charged a fee. At a Catholic managed home here, it is $100/night which infuriates me because it discourages families from spending time with their loved ones. On the other hand, there are waiting lists of people to get into these care homes.

We need more advocates, people. If this story upsets you, get out in your community and volunteer or advocate for those with special needs.


The home gets their SSI and benefits. Their workshop money goes into a bank account. It upsets me when a sister or brother has control over an account and I've heard from that sister like, once every few months. They get Popsicles and stuff but no money to do much of anything else. I used to volunteer but now with school and internship (basically volunteer work) and required hours, I don't have spare time until August. I think mentally disabled older adults don't get very much attention so I'm doing fundraisers to get the guys to summer camp and just sort of let people know that this population is out there. The guys I work with are pretty awesome, funny, and good company (especially for a person that doesn't get along well with "normal" people...I'm kind of a jerk).
2013-05-02 10:46:01 AM
1 votes:

jafiwam: Necronic: This is apalling.  Human piece of garbage.  If you read some of the related articles you get a better picture of the guy.  He even goes so far as to blame the families of the disabled men for not visiting and noticing the problems themselves, saying they should feel guilty.

The families were probably getting and cashing disability checks for a lot of these folks.  That would explain the big gaping silence from them on where the people were and what was happening to them.


Would they have been getting disability checks if they were employed? I don't know, but I wouldn't be surprised if these people were being victimized from all sides.
2013-05-02 09:34:39 AM
1 votes:
This article paints a more descriptive picture of the kind of operation this guy was running. No heath care, wouldn't even help 'the boys' sign up for Medicaid, no company tax returns for years, it goes on and on.

Basically, a good 'job creator'.
2013-05-02 09:29:19 AM
1 votes:

espiaboricua: p>WTFDYW: I can't farking believe this went under the radar for so long. I hope Henry's has the assetts to be forced to pay each of these men all that they were awarded.

The owner of the company has already said that they don't have the money to pay because they closed the company (coincidentially, while this case was being investigated)... so, my most sincere and non-snarky wish of good luck to the EEOC trying to recover that much money from them.


Let me guess, soon after they opened a new company calls Schmenry's, which miraculously has all of the assets but none of the liabilities of the old company.
2013-05-02 09:15:36 AM
1 votes:
If we got rid of the EEOC and its job-killing regulations the Market would take care of this. People would do their own research and vote with their dollars. They'd only buy turkeys from non-slave plants. Companies that did this kind of thing would lose customers and treat their workers better.

But we've gotten lazy because the coercive government steals the job creators' money and does it all for us. Thank Galt for Paul Ryan and Rand Paul who will get rid of this Market-distorting abomination and lead us into the Promised Land
2013-05-02 09:05:59 AM
1 votes:

drb9: Supposedly 30 years of abuse and terrible conditions, and you can't prove that a single crime was committed, yet you feel comfortable charging the guy's company $240 million.


It is almost as if criminal and civil proceedings were separate.
2013-05-02 09:02:13 AM
1 votes:
Their families dumped them there 30 years ago?  It's the Magdelene Sisters all over again.
2013-05-02 09:02:07 AM
1 votes:

Fade2black: randomjsa: FlashHarry: clearly we need less regulation!

Don't be inept. Regulations were being violated nine ways from Sunday having more or less regulations would change nothing for the victims in this case.

Pretty much this. Don't be retarded, Libtard.


Ok so clearly we need to continue defunding regulatory agencies.
2013-05-02 09:01:34 AM
1 votes:
Here's why it went on so long "undetected."  The relatives of the disabled men were perfectly happy not having to care for them.

What's interesting is this line from the EEOC attorney:
"Our prosecutors felt that they could not meet the high burden of proof required in criminal court," Greenwood said. In other words, while they are pretty sure some bad stuff happened, they are not sure enough to meet the "beyond a reasonable doubt" standard.  Imagine this.  Supposedly 30 years of abuse and terrible conditions, and you can't prove that a single crime was committed, yet you feel comfortable charging the guy's company $240 million.
2013-05-02 08:59:49 AM
1 votes:

bugmn99: Perhaps now the missus won't act so damned indignant when I inform her that her Thanksgiving dinner has the scent of a retarded man's hands.


That or you can wear mitts when taking it out of the oven.
2013-05-02 08:59:45 AM
1 votes:
It should be against the law to tip the authorities off. Just like you cant take pictures of a slaughterhouse, you shouldn't be able to divulge slave labor, etc.
2013-05-02 08:54:45 AM
1 votes:
GOBBLE, GOBBLE!
2013-05-02 08:54:22 AM
1 votes:

FlashHarry: clearly we need less regulation!


Don't be inept. Regulations were being violated nine ways from Sunday having more or less regulations would change nothing for the victims in this case.
2013-05-02 08:41:43 AM
1 votes:
clearly we need less regulation!
2013-05-02 08:35:00 AM
1 votes:

WTFDYW: I can't farking believe this went under the radar for so long. I hope Henry's has the assetts to be forced to pay each of these men all that they were awarded.


Seriously.  This happening in 1910?  Yeah, I could certainly see that.  But in this day and age?  Don't ANY of these people have family looking out for them?
 
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