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(Quad City Times)   Turkey slaughterhouse that employed mentally handicapped men and allowed them to live in squalor while taking 90% of their wages found guilty of varied crimes, ordered to pay the men $240 million   (qctimes.com) divider line 116
    More: Followup, found guilty, Atalissa, burden of proof, development director, West Liberty  
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8984 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 May 2013 at 8:48 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-02 01:14:13 PM

megarian: Madame Ovary: megarian: One of my jobs is working with adult mentally disabled men (the youngest guy is ~50, the oldest ~75). I get extremely frustrated with the system they're in. Many go to workshops and do actual work, but there's never money for me to take them to breakfast or even get them a candy bar. I end up spending a huge chunk of my paycheck on candy and colored pencils and Big Boy. I have no access to their financial records, but something seems off. They are kept clean and have a really nice house, which is awesome. Their families rarely call or visit. Many of their guardians are siblings and I'm pretty sure that's where their money is going.

The only things I can do is take them to free stuff, like the senior citizens do a big band performance at a high school and sometimes I'll go to the museum, bat my eyelashes and can sneak them in for free (thanx front desk guy at the DIA).

Stuff like this makes me feel terrible and frustrated. I really hope these guys get taken care of, but I'm pretty sure they'll never benefit from that money. Goddamnitsomuch.

Who pays for their food and housing? I have a small child as of yet but I've heard that for adults all federal money goes to the agency that provides residence.  Each resident then would only get like $50/month spending money. Rich and poor get the same unless families have set up a special needs trust to pay for the extras - favorite popsicles, an Icee from 7-11, movie, etc. Special needs trusts are a fairly new thing. Clients in the age range you are talking about would have had a tough upbringing with fewer opportunities than our children today. It takes a big heart to do what you are doing. Hats off to you!

I would guess in the this abuse case that families drove over on Sunday to take their loved one out to lunch but never questioned conditions because their loved one was clean and happy to see them. That is what I hope at least, some minimal amount of contact.

Some institutions/group homes requir ...


The current system will be overwhelmed with adults in the near future with the autism generation aging out of the school systems. Parents are becoming greater advocates for their kids fortunately.  Still, I think some parents are so relieved to get some help and fear losing that help that they are willing to accept substandard care for their loved one as long as they aren't "abused".

We are trying to raise our kids with a sense of responsibility for their brother but who knows what will happen. No one wants the risk of having to care for him 24/7, 365 days/yr. Navigating rights, laws, government aide, complicated healthcare needs, etc. is very confusing and budgets for those in care are often the first to be cut.

You are correct, also, that rec is so important for this population. I try to take my son on 3 outings/day - library, 7-11, bike ride, etc.  It can be exhausting but we see behavioral benefits at home.

Keep up the good work! I hope you are going into neuroscience/psych, special ed law, or  special ed or one of the therapies. It sounds like you have the heart for it.
 
2013-05-02 01:14:24 PM

drb9: Here's why it went on so long "undetected."  The relatives of the disabled men were perfectly happy not having to care for them.


....to the point of expressing no curiosity whatever about the mens' lives, in case they might have to do something. It might not have seen the light of day except the one guy's sister was sharp enough to see how it would make her look for not reporting once she was told.
 
2013-05-02 01:21:08 PM
There many different studies that rank services for those with disabilities. This was recently published by the United Cerebral Palsy Foundation.http://www.ucp.org/the-case-for-inclusion/2013/ranking_map .html
 
2013-05-02 01:26:33 PM

zetar: espiaboricua: p>WTFDYW: I can't farking believe this went under the radar for so long. I hope Henry's has the assetts to be forced to pay each of these men all that they were awarded.

The owner of the company has already said that they don't have the money to pay because they closed the company (coincidentially, while this case was being investigated)... so, my most sincere and non-snarky wish of good luck to the EEOC trying to recover that much money from them.

Okay, a couple of things that may, or may not, have been mentioned in the story (the QC Times keeps rewriting and relinking):

1. This is not the first fine levied against Henry.
2. There are already almost $2 million in fines from the State of Iowa.
3. Henry shut down his Iowa operation and ran back to Texas making it impossible for the State of Iowa to collect.

I'm hoping that EEOC can seize everything that Henry has hidden in Texas.


Texas is one of the most difficult states in which to enforce a civil judgment, if not the most difficult.
/not an expert
 
2013-05-02 01:27:08 PM
Traditionally, it's been difficult to beat someone in civil court if the criminal courts hadn't already validated grounds for recompence. Since OJ, the civil courts have been eveners for people who beat the system in the criminal courts. It smells a little like double jeopardy, but who's complaining?
 
2013-05-02 01:31:25 PM
Madame Ovary:

Thanks! I'm doing my master's in mental health and social work.

Difficulty: Detroit :)

But I love it. Thanks for the kind words! Very much appreciated.
 
2013-05-02 01:42:06 PM
I'm surprised how quick farkers are to demonize the families. It is exhausting caring for someone with severe disabilities. A life commitment and then some. These men are old. They were raised when disability, especially developmental disability, was seriously stigmatized in the community.  Doctors would tell families to send their dd children away and forget about them, and they would.  If parents could do that, it would be even easier for siblings.

I can't find an anti-bullying documentary from the 1950s.  Mom calls the police because a group of high school boys are bullying the woman's dd son who is playing in the front yard. He is riding a tire horse. Anyway know the psa I'm talking about?
 
2013-05-02 02:11:33 PM

Madame Ovary: I'm surprised how quick farkers are to demonize the families. It is exhausting caring for someone with severe disabilities. A life commitment and then some. These men are old. They were raised when disability, especially developmental disability, was seriously stigmatized in the community.  Doctors would tell families to send their dd children away and forget about them, and they would.  If parents could do that, it would be even easier for siblings.

I can't find an anti-bullying documentary from the 1950s.  Mom calls the police because a group of high school boys are bullying the woman's dd son who is playing in the front yard. He is riding a tire horse. Anyway know the psa I'm talking about?


I'm not demonizing the families.  Actually, maybe I am.  I believe that many/most of them were quite content to have their relative out of their house and not "exhausting" them.  Not being a "life commitment."  I believe they were so happy to have this be the case that they turned a blind eye to the living and working conditions.  (They are in good company, by the way.  The Kennedys did it to Rosemary.)  And then, when someone told the relatives that they could turn around and profit from this situation, they did what every right-thinking American would do--they greedily accepted this approach.
 
2013-05-02 03:01:32 PM
Great ruling, except that all of the former workers accepted two pieces of string, a marble, and a chunk of shoe leather in exchange for their share of the judgment amount.
 
2013-05-02 03:42:59 PM

drb9: Madame Ovary: I'm surprised how quick farkers are to demonize the families. It is exhausting caring for someone with severe disabilities. A life commitment and then some. These men are old. They were raised when disability, especially developmental disability, was seriously stigmatized in the community.  Doctors would tell families to send their dd children away and forget about them, and they would.  If parents could do that, it would be even easier for siblings.

I can't find an anti-bullying documentary from the 1950s.  Mom calls the police because a group of high school boys are bullying the woman's dd son who is playing in the front yard. He is riding a tire horse. Anyway know the psa I'm talking about?

I'm not demonizing the families.  Actually, maybe I am.  I believe that many/most of them were quite content to have their relative out of their house and not "exhausting" them.  Not being a "life commitment."  I believe they were so happy to have this be the case that they turned a blind eye to the living and working conditions.  (They are in good company, by the way.  The Kennedys did it to Rosemary.)  And then, when someone told the relatives that they could turn around and profit from this situation, they did what every right-thinking American would do--they greedily accepted this approach.


Wasn't it a family member that identified the abuse?   Anyways, there is some historical truth to what you're saying, but you really can't speculate.  The only hard facts we have in this case surround an evil old man.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-05-02 03:57:32 PM
GoldDude: Great ruling, except that all of the former workers accepted two pieces of string, a marble, and a chunk of shoe leather in exchange for their share of the judgment amount.

There was a case in Massachusetts a year or two ago where a sleazy loan company was offering a somewhat mentally disabled woman pennies on the dollar for a judgment she had won. For whatever reason (possibly the woman's condition) a judge had to approve the deal. Instead of approving he threatened the company with contempt if they tried to take advantage of the woman again.  Sadly I can't find the case; it was probably on socialaw.com which wipes trial court orders from its site after six months.
 
2013-05-02 05:19:55 PM

ph0rk: You could point out they probably mean heightened enforcement and more inspectors


And be wrong.  Because there's a pretty clear difference between calling up your critter and asking for more funding/priority for enforcement and asking for new laws.
 
2013-05-02 05:56:30 PM

nekom: Don't ANY of these people have family looking out for them?


Clearly not many of them had "family" who cared enough to notice and act.

Which is we shouldn't setup a system that requires "family" to bear the sole responsibility for people with a legal disability (including children) in the first place -- not everyone has a family that is able or willing provide (potentially life-long) support services when they're in need, and some of the people have terrible families that will actively exploit them given the chance.
 
2013-05-02 06:00:23 PM

WTFDYW: I can't farking believe this went under the radar for so long. I hope Henry's has the assetts to be forced to pay each of these men all that they were awarded.


FTFA: "Henry's, which also does business as Hill Country Farms, hasn't paid $1.6 million in previous federal and state fines related to the men, according to records."

so these guys have a judgement but little chance of getting any real money.
 
2013-05-02 08:00:23 PM

JohnCarter: Me thinks there is more to this story.  So these folks lived there for 30 years and the families never ever came by to see them?  They never left, never visited?


There tards --Duh
 
2013-05-03 03:51:24 AM
That's gonna buy a whole lot of crayons and wrestling tickets.
 
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