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(Wimp)   And today's awesome helicopter flying skills comes to you from Norway   (wimp.com) divider line 21
    More: Spiffy, Norway, helicopters  
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6048 clicks; posted to Video » on 02 May 2013 at 11:56 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-02 10:23:54 AM
 
2013-05-02 10:52:56 AM
Even more interesting is why they needed a physician:

i295.photobucket.com


This guy was seen in the area.
 
2013-05-02 12:17:34 PM
That's actually pretty routine (the link, not  Fubini's video). That's what helicopters do.
 
2013-05-02 12:41:19 PM

Old_Chief_Scott: That's actually pretty routine


I find that hard to believe.
 
2013-05-02 01:00:46 PM

Uncle Pooky: Old_Chief_Scott: That's actually pretty routine

I find that hard to believe.


We practiced that kind of crap all of the time. In Hueys we called that the one skid pick-up.
 
2013-05-02 01:54:07 PM

Uncle Pooky: Old_Chief_Scott: That's actually pretty routine

I find that hard to believe.


On my travels I often see the kent air ambulance landing at emergencies. One such occasion, the ground was so uneven it couldn't land at all, a farmer got a ladder off his truck and rested it against the hovering chopper's skid, allowing a paramedic to get out and start working on the casualty while the pilot found a suitable spot to land
 
2013-05-02 03:11:47 PM

Stantz: Uncle Pooky: Old_Chief_Scott: That's actually pretty routine

I find that hard to believe.

On my travels I often see the kent air ambulance landing at emergencies. One such occasion, the ground was so uneven it couldn't land at all, a farmer got a ladder off his truck and rested it against the hovering chopper's skid, allowing a paramedic to get out and start working on the casualty while the pilot found a suitable spot to land


Why couldn't the chopper just lower down enough for the paramedic to hop out?
 
2013-05-02 03:31:41 PM

Uncle Pooky: Stantz: Uncle Pooky: Old_Chief_Scott: That's actually pretty routine

I find that hard to believe.

On my travels I often see the kent air ambulance landing at emergencies. One such occasion, the ground was so uneven it couldn't land at all, a farmer got a ladder off his truck and rested it against the hovering chopper's skid, allowing a paramedic to get out and start working on the casualty while the pilot found a suitable spot to land

Why couldn't the chopper just lower down enough for the paramedic to hop out?


I'm pretty sure it was Too close to the cliff.  The downdrafts from the rotors would be more unpredictable bouncing off the road and running up the cliff face.   Though i'm sure it was difficult with the wind coming up off the road compared to the wash going down the cliff under the tail.  meh.  Someone correct me.

My guess. I only have limited helicopter exp and Physics class.
 
2013-05-02 03:32:39 PM

Uncle Pooky: Stantz: Uncle Pooky: Old_Chief_Scott: That's actually pretty routine

I find that hard to believe.

On my travels I often see the kent air ambulance landing at emergencies. One such occasion, the ground was so uneven it couldn't land at all, a farmer got a ladder off his truck and rested it against the hovering chopper's skid, allowing a paramedic to get out and start working on the casualty while the pilot found a suitable spot to land

Why couldn't the chopper just lower down enough for the paramedic to hop out?


It was a 10-foot drop (3 metres). Health and safety be damned
 
2013-05-02 04:06:57 PM
Senordos13:

I'm pretty sure it was Too close to the cliff.  The downdrafts from the rotors would be more unpredictable bouncing off the road and running up the cliff face.   Though i'm sure it was difficult with the wind coming up off the road compared to the wash going down the cliff under the tail.  meh.  Someone correct me.

My guess. I only have limited helicopter exp and Physics class.


I wasn't referring to the video, I was referring to the CSB from Stantz.

Stantz:

It was a 10-foot drop (3 metres). Health and safety be damned

My question remains unanswered.
 
2013-05-02 04:25:39 PM

Uncle Pooky: Old_Chief_Scott: That's actually pretty routine

I find that hard to believe.


How you think helicopters land?  They don't descend to 10 ft and then just WHAM! onto the ground.  It's a machine perfectly capable of hovering and not moving a whole lot provided there aren't strong winds.
 
2013-05-02 04:43:13 PM

Slam Dunkz: Uncle Pooky: Old_Chief_Scott: That's actually pretty routine

I find that hard to believe.

How you think helicopters land?  They don't descend to 10 ft and then just WHAM! onto the ground.  It's a machine perfectly capable of hovering and not moving a whole lot provided there aren't strong winds.


That's great, and thank you for sharing... but the "not routine" part I was referring to was the balancing on a guardrail part.
 
2013-05-02 05:20:26 PM
Any pilot with 3 minutes of flight time can do that.
 
2013-05-02 05:21:13 PM
By the way, he's not balanced, he's still in a hover with one skid touching the guard rail.
 
2013-05-02 06:01:10 PM
 
2013-05-02 06:32:50 PM
The reason for putting a skid on the guardrail is to stabilize the aircraft. It will now pivot about that one spot. Compare and contrast to this video  where the pilot does not plant the skid. There is a lot more relative motion. It makes for a little bit trickier transition for the man moving from aircraft to ground, but it's still pretty straightforward.
 
2013-05-02 06:43:31 PM
May be routine to helicopter pilots, and I may understand it in theory, but it's cool to me to see it in practice.
 
2013-05-02 07:01:49 PM
I've heard of this sort of thing happening before.  Terrible tragedies.  Looks like a moose bit someone's sister.
 
2013-05-02 09:22:45 PM
   Much heli experience from forestry work. Lots of our heli pads are a single log which the pilot rests the skids on, like this pilot on the guard rail. It is the one thing i don't miss from doing logging and silviculture work; scary machines especially mountain flying. My first windshear experience in a Bell 407 made me never want to fly again....f*cking scary....
   Ask a heli ski guide, SAR or an initial-attack guy about hover exits.....
 
2013-05-02 11:19:03 PM
A question for those that will actually have a true answer, why isn't the guard rail not electrically charged?  I ask because after watching a footage of crews attaching large cargo to the underside of helicopters have to use a grounding rod to protect themselves from static electricity being stored in the body of the aircraft created by the friction of the rotors.  So, my thought is when that helicopter touched the steel guardrail there would be a risk of electrical shock traveling along the length of the rail.  Of course given the rail is supported by wood posts as oppose to steel posts and therefore the shock would've effected any and all persons completing the ground.  Of course if the rail is supported by steel posts, the shock would've grounded straight down and no one would've considered how close they had come to danger.
 
2013-05-03 08:55:13 AM
lack of warmth, the helicopter builds up a static charge over a short period of time. Once it has discharged it's not as though the aircraft then behaves like a plugged in power cord (well, actually it does but the charge is very low).  When this helicopter touched the guardrail it discharged its differential charge, which would not be large enough to be harmful to anyone touching the rail.

Hope that makes sense.

If you are really interested I'll tell you about the time I took a 20,000 volt static discharge through my scrotum.
 
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