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(USA Today)   Poll of human resource managers by the N.S. Sherlock Institute finds that millennials suck at job interviews   (usatoday.com) divider line 42
    More: Obvious, staffing firm, ManpowerGroup, Seekers  
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2013-05-02 06:43:09 AM
I've heard these stories for twenty years now, it may just be the some people of every generation are breathtakingly stupid.
 
2013-05-02 07:13:36 AM
Done in one.Also, who are millennials now?In 2004 I was one. Now I'm a 32 year old working in management. Am I still a millennial? Or maybe now I'm "generation Y". In 5 years or so I'll probably be classified as generation X.You know, cause people still think its 2002 or so.The f'n baby boomers are in their 60's now, not 40's anymore./dnrtfa
 
2013-05-02 07:25:14 AM

sure haven't: Now I'm a 32 year old working in management. Am I still a millennial?


The trend reflects a generation of Millennials - ranging in age from 18 to 34 - who grew up texting and using smartphones and social media, says Mara Swan, executive vice president of staffing firm Manpower Group.
 
2013-05-02 07:35:58 AM

sure haven't: Done in one.Also, who are millennials now?In 2004 I was one. Now I'm a 32 year old working in management. Am I still a millennial? Or maybe now I'm "generation Y". In 5 years or so I'll probably be classified as generation X.You know, cause people still think its 2002 or so.The f'n baby boomers are in their 60's now, not 40's anymore./dnrtfa


No need to curse the President because he's a boomer.

/same age as the president

Most of the young ones we hire at my agency really have no idea how to function in a work place, a few do and we keep them. It seems to me that they're just not being taught basics.
 
2013-05-02 07:41:07 AM
Helicopter parents are awesome!
 
2013-05-02 07:42:50 AM

sure haven't: Done in one.Also, who are millennials now?In 2004 I was one. Now I'm a 32 year old working in management. Am I still a millennial? Or maybe now I'm "generation Y". In 5 years or so I'll probably be classified as generation X.You know, cause people still think its 2002 or so.The f'n baby boomers are in their 60's now, not 40's anymore./dnrtfa


Gen Y and Millenials are the same group. Don't know why it was changed.

And do millenials suck at interviewing, or is it they just look bad compared to the decrepit boomers who they're fighting for the entry level positions?
 
2013-05-02 07:48:17 AM

Free Radical: Helicopter parents are awesome!


Attack helicopter parents are.

Pew pew pew!  Ka-booosh!
 
2013-05-02 07:52:43 AM
I've got three interviews scheduled this afternoon with candidates that are fresh out of school.  Now I'm hoping that at least one of them brings a puppy or a kitten.
 
2013-05-02 07:57:11 AM

Parkanzky: I've got three interviews scheduled this afternoon with candidates that are fresh out of school.  Now I'm hoping that at least one of them brings a puppy or a kitten.


I'd settle for bringing their hot milf
 
2013-05-02 07:59:18 AM

sendtodave: sure haven't: Now I'm a 32 year old working in management. Am I still a millennial?

The trend reflects a generation of Millennials - ranging in age from 18 to 34 - who grew up texting and using smartphones and social media, says Mara Swan, executive vice president of staffing firm Manpower Group.


What 30-year-old grew up texting and using social media?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but most 30-year-olds would have been out of high school before the rise of facebook, myspace, texting, smartphones...

So, I'll just assume that the director of the Manpower group doesn't know jack shiat, and also doesn't realize that their company's name sounds like a supplier of gay men for pornography.
 
2013-05-02 08:05:58 AM
Klivian:
Gen Y and Millenials are the same group. Don't know why it was changed.

And do millenials suck at interviewing, or is it they just look bad compared to the decrepit boomers who they're fighting for the entry level positions?


You must consider that HR is usually staffed by the aforementioned decrepit boomers, or at very least headed by them.

CSB - I fall within the range of "millenial." I was born in '85. I know computers well enough to be considered proficient. I use a smart phone. I show up to interviews in a suit and write things down.

I've had interviewers' cell-phones interrupt me. So clearly I deserve the job because I can't believe they'd do such a thing. Why, its simply not done in the finer houses! Harumph! Harumph!

Millenials probably suck just as much as every previous generation at interviewing in front of old people who don't understand this new rocking-and-rolling, back in their day the Charleston was the bee's knees! The world changes and the people in power don't understand/don't like it, so extreme examples are used to support their viewpoints, usually not based in reality.
 
2013-05-02 08:08:21 AM
Granted, the anecdotal examples in the story are truly bizarre, but I think the overall shiatty interviewing by millennials stems from inexperience.  I still cringe when I think back to my first few interviews with HR drones and my responses to their pointless "greatest weakness,"  "what would you change about yourself," and "how do you think others perceive you" questions that must NEVER be answered honestly (particularly when you are an inexperienced and insecure kid fresh out of college).   Combine the inexperience of the younger millenials with a highly competitive job market, where older people are now competing for entry level jobs and you have a skewed perspective of an entire generation that is likely to be just fine and dandy in a few years.
 
2013-05-02 08:09:55 AM

FirstNationalBastard: sendtodave: sure haven't: Now I'm a 32 year old working in management. Am I still a millennial?

The trend reflects a generation of Millennials - ranging in age from 18 to 34 - who grew up texting and using smartphones and social media, says Mara Swan, executive vice president of staffing firm Manpower Group.

What 30-year-old grew up texting and using social media?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but most 30-year-olds would have been out of high school before the rise of facebook, myspace, texting, smartphones...

So, I'll just assume that the director of the Manpower group doesn't know jack shiat, and also doesn't realize that their company's name sounds like a supplier of gay men for pornography.



If the director of the manpower group resembles the other generic Human Resource Directors I have met and dealt with, thats an extremely safe assumption.

There are some good human resources people.  They are the exception.  Our Human Resources manager never had any experience with human resources prior to this, doesn't know any of the rules or guidelines, is constantly calling the home office for information completely accessible to him via their online resources, reporting out the information he receives incorrectly, and is in general a nearly perfect picture of how NOT to run a human resources department.
 
2013-05-02 08:16:14 AM

FirstNationalBastard: So, I'll just assume that the director of the Manpower group doesn't know jack shiat, and also doesn't realize that their company's name sounds like a supplier of gay men for pornography.


You're thinking of the Manplower Group.

Its a common mistake.
 
2013-05-02 08:16:56 AM
Old people can be content that they are quite superior to younger people.

This daily affirmation brought to you by USAToday.  USAToday: News... for Old People.
 
2013-05-02 08:17:46 AM
The fact is that the working culture changed a lot in the 50's, the 70's, the 90's, today and it will continue to change.

At the last company I worked for, there was a rule against electronic devices at meetings unless you were actually using them to contribute to the agenda.  This meant that I often sat through back-to-back-to-back 1-1.5 hour meetings where my expertise might be needed for 5-10 minutes and the rest of the time I sat and quietly contemplated the life choices I'd made to put me in that situation.

At my current company, I've had a project manager announce that he understands that a lot of the upcoming meetings won't have agenda items for everybody but he'd like us to show up and do other work from our laptops and phones so that we're there in case our input is needed on an issue.

About half the people in the meetings I attend here will have their phone sitting on the table in front of them.  That's the current reality here and I don't see anything wrong with it so long as people are conscientious about how and when they fiddle with them.

I agree that none of the interviewees I meet today would be doing themselves any favors by using their phone during the interview, but that's a meeting where the entire focus is on them and how they can add value to the company.
 
2013-05-02 08:20:27 AM

Parkanzky: The fact is that the working culture changed a lot in the 50's, the 70's, the 90's, today and it will continue to change.

At the last company I worked for, there was a rule against electronic devices at meetings unless you were actually using them to contribute to the agenda.  This meant that I often sat through back-to-back-to-back 1-1.5 hour meetings where my expertise might be needed for 5-10 minutes and the rest of the time I sat and quietly contemplated the life choices I'd made to put me in that situation.

At my current company, I've had a project manager announce that he understands that a lot of the upcoming meetings won't have agenda items for everybody but he'd like us to show up and do other work from our laptops and phones so that we're there in case our input is needed on an issue.

About half the people in the meetings I attend here will have their phone sitting on the table in front of them.  That's the current reality here and I don't see anything wrong with it so long as people are conscientious about how and when they fiddle with them.

I agree that none of the interviewees I meet today would be doing themselves any favors by using their phone during the interview, but that's a meeting where the entire focus is on them and how they can add value to the company.


I would LOVE that.  We aren't allowed electronic devices in the entire building (not out of some crazy draconian ant-tech view, its a security thing), and I HATE sitting in meetings contemplating life and attempting to look interested when I know I have half-a-dozen things I could be doing at the time.
 
2013-05-02 08:26:59 AM
I'm about to turn 30, and I'd like to add to my own poll.

My studies have found that as the economy has tanked HR has gotten worse and worse at hiring competent people, it isn't the pool of candidates, but their computer filtering and unreasonable qualifications for the salary being offered.

If you want good people, train them yourselves.  If you go for the purple squirrel you're going to get someone that can twist words better than anyone else that was looked at and is solely interested in money.
 
2013-05-02 08:30:32 AM
Didn't we just have this thread?
 
2013-05-02 08:32:18 AM

Bondith: Didn't we just have this thread?


Yes, the boomers of Fark, however, want to repeat it as much as possible because there's nothing they like better than glorifying themselves.
 
2013-05-02 08:35:50 AM

Girion47: Bondith: Didn't we just have this thread?

Yes, the boomers of Fark, however, want to repeat it as much as possible because there's nothing they like better than glorifying themselves.


There has to be a balance against the boomer hate threads.

/Gen X, I have no dog in this fight
//We hate you both.
 
2013-05-02 08:38:15 AM

EvilEgg: Girion47: Bondith: Didn't we just have this thread?

Yes, the boomers of Fark, however, want to repeat it as much as possible because there's nothing they like better than glorifying themselves.

There has to be a balance against the boomer hate threads.

/Gen X, I have no dog in this fight
//We hate you both.


Go be apathetic elsewhere.
 
2013-05-02 08:40:39 AM

Girion47: Bondith: Didn't we just have this thread?

Yes, the boomers of Fark, however, want to repeat it as much as possible because there's nothing they like better than glorifying themselves.


Cool.  I can't wait for the part where they tell us we're lazy and it's our fault we can't find a good-paying job in an afternoon like they did in 1973.

I also take issue with being called a millenial.  I was born in the transition between Gen X and Gen Y.  I finished highschool before cellphones were omnipresent (I visited Australia in 1998 and was surprised that all my former schoolmates now had mobiles, while none of my Canadian classmates did).  Someone getting a digital camera for graduation was noteworthy (not a phone with a built-in camera, an actual camera).  I finished my undergrad ten years ago (...sweet fark, really?), and that was before Facebook really took off.  So, yeah, don't lump me in with the texting, tweeting clueless kids, since I have nothing in common with them.
 
2013-05-02 08:43:13 AM
Well I'll be sure to mention this if I see an interviewer look at their blackberry. It work both ways.
 
2013-05-02 08:47:31 AM
Oh look an article claiming that kids today are dumber than kids of 20 years ago.  This is not a repeat of every old person whining since 5000 BC.
 
2013-05-02 08:49:11 AM

sure haven't: Also, who are millennials now?


People under 40 you don't like. Like "hipsters."
 
2013-05-02 08:52:38 AM
Would say its natural selection at work; but thanks to the government, the losers will be taken care of for doing nothing.
 
2013-05-02 08:58:38 AM
It's a simple shift in generational dynamics, nothing more. Ten years ago I'd have never thought of wearing anything but a suit and tie to any interview, but, today, I'd feel comfortable interviewing in slacks and an oxford or polo shirt. Eventually, as "millenials" start to define workplace norms and push us older folks out they'll make these types of "oddball" behaviors acceptable and normal.

MrLint: Well I'll be sure to mention this if I see an interviewer look at their blackberry. It work both ways.


Except it doesn't. Especially not in the current competitive jobs market and super especially not when you're a newbie out of school coming into that competitive jobs market. If I have something you and a bunch of other people want I get to dictate the terms and there's jack all you can do about it.
 
2013-05-02 09:04:53 AM

skozlaw: It's a simple shift in generational dynamics, nothing more. Ten years ago I'd have never thought of wearing anything but a suit and tie to any interview, but, today, I'd feel comfortable interviewing in slacks and an oxford or polo shirt. Eventually, as "millenials" start to define workplace norms and push us older folks out they'll make these types of "oddball" behaviors acceptable and normal.


I don't think I own a tie, and I sure as hell can't tie one myself.  I'll still do the rest of the suit for interviews, though.

/hating ties puts me in the same category as Ahminadinnerjacket.  Not sure how I feel about that
 
2013-05-02 09:05:50 AM
FirstNationalBastard:
The trend reflects a generation of Millennials - ranging in age from 18 to 34 - who grew up texting and using smartphones and social media, says Mara Swan, executive vice president of staffing firm Manpower Group.

What 30-year-old grew up texting and using social media?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but most 30-year-olds would have been out of high school before the rise of facebook, myspace, texting, smartphones...


Gen Y got rounded into the Millennials due to the short window between the end of Gen X (~1980) and the beginning of when kids/teenagers started growing up with the internet as a ubiquitous presence in their lives (Born ~87 onwards). Most of Gen Y was still pretty young (late teens, very early 20's) when the internet and social media exploded and so they adapted to it more like the Millennials than Gen X and got  grouped with the Millennials because you can't really have a 'generation' that's 7 years long.
 
2013-05-02 09:06:44 AM

SaladMonkey: Granted, the anecdotal examples in the story are truly bizarre, but I think the overall shiatty interviewing by millennials stems from inexperience.  I still cringe when I think back to my first few interviews with HR drones and my responses to their pointless "greatest weakness,"  "what would you change about yourself," and "how do you think others perceive you" questions that must NEVER be answered honestly (particularly when you are an inexperienced and insecure kid fresh out of college).   Combine the inexperience of the younger millenials with a highly competitive job market, where older people are now competing for entry level jobs and you have a skewed perspective of an entire generation that is likely to be just fine and dandy in a few years.


There's  certainly some inexperience involved, but there's a lot of the "everyone look at me" effect of social media combined with the "everyone gets a trophy" attitude of today's education and parenting.

They think their awesomeness is so obviously apparent to everyone they don't have to do anything to stand out and any behavior will be accepted.

Just yesterday, my office got packets from  roughly 30 people seeking a summer internship.  These are people in a postgraduate program looking to gain a pretty sought after spot.  One of the packet's requirements was a photo.  Roughly 1/3 of them sent a picture were they were nicely dressed in professional attire.  Another third sent photos in casual dress but otherwise well presented.  Among the rest, we had a couple of self portraits taken via cellphone while looking in a mirror.  A vacation photo taken at a scenic overlook.  A guy wearing a hoodie in what may well have been the local drunk tank.  A female wearing a tee shirt from a bar.  One male sent a close up head shot where he had about three day's stubble and bed head.  Another guy that was my personal favorite sent a full body shot of himself wearing jeans and a wife beater taken as he opened the door to enter a convenience store.

They carefully prepared their application packets over a period of time and came to the conclusion that these pictures were the proper choice.  That's not nervous inexperience at work.
 
2013-05-02 09:14:40 AM
"Human Resource Manager" == unqualified for real work

But it looks like we found the one topic where Fark has decided to take their opinion seriously.
 
2013-05-02 09:15:39 AM

JustGetItRight: Just yesterday, my office got packets from roughly 30 people seeking a summer internship. These are people in a postgraduate program looking to gain a pretty sought after spot. One of the packet's requirements was a photo.


Gotta find the hotties huh?
 
2013-05-02 09:16:20 AM

JustGetItRight: One of the packet's requirements was a photo.



That's pretty unusual in the US.  If you don't mind me asking, what country is the internship in, and why does it require a photo to be considered?
 
2013-05-02 09:19:24 AM

Target Builder: Gen Y got rounded into the Millennials due to the short window between the end of Gen X (~1980) and the beginning of when kids/teenagers started growing up with the internet as a ubiquitous presence in their lives (Born ~87 onwards).


This.  Boomers liked it when everyone was categorized by age groups (probably to distinguish themselves), but there was a HUGE paradigm shift in the 1990s.  The proliferation of the Internet was a historical event, so it was far more relevant than being a number of years younger than the Boomers.

Lately I don't see much of a distinction between Gen X and Millenial in terms of what year you were born.  If you were using the Internet daily before you stopped growing, you're a Millenial.

YodaTuna: Oh look an article claiming that kids today are dumber than kids of 20 years ago. This is not a repeat of every old person whining since 5000 BC.


Actually they're HR managers being asked to judge recent college grads.  I'm surprised the smug didn't go supernova.
 
2013-05-02 09:30:27 AM

Bondith: skozlaw: It's a simple shift in generational dynamics, nothing more. Ten years ago I'd have never thought of wearing anything but a suit and tie to any interview, but, today, I'd feel comfortable interviewing in slacks and an oxford or polo shirt. Eventually, as "millenials" start to define workplace norms and push us older folks out they'll make these types of "oddball" behaviors acceptable and normal.

I don't think I own a tie, and I sure as hell can't tie one myself.  I'll still do the rest of the suit for interviews, though.

/hating ties puts me in the same category as Ahminadinnerjacket.  Not sure how I feel about that


I like wearing my suit to interviews, I don't get to wear it as often as I'd like since I've changed clients from the TSA to the Army.   And yeah, I know how to tie a tie, the proper way, a windsor knot.

/Still hoping for a chance to use one of these knots.
agreeordie.penguininitiativ.netdna-cdn.com
agreeordie.penguininitiativ.netdna-cdn.com
Directions on how to do it
 
2013-05-02 09:41:47 AM

GilRuiz1: JustGetItRight: One of the packet's requirements was a photo.


That's pretty unusual in the US.  If you don't mind me asking, what country is the internship in, and why does it require a photo to be considered?


USA.  It is law enforcement related so there are a few more odd requirements like fingerprint and background checks but it really beats me why they ask for a photo - they're going to get plenty from the background anyhow.
 
2013-05-02 09:47:31 AM

Girion47: I like wearing my suit to interviews, I don't get to wear it as often as I'd like since I've changed clients from the TSA to the Army. And yeah, I know how to tie a tie, the proper way, a windsor knot.

/Still hoping for a chance to use one of these knots.


A Windsor knot is the only method I know. I think if I got to a point in my life where I had the spare time to learn any more tie knots I'd just go ahead and kill myself....

/ nothing has ever been done by anybody in a tie that couldn't have been done better by someone who dressed himself properly that day
// ties suck donkey nards, is my point
 
2013-05-02 10:03:31 AM

JustGetItRight: USA. It is law enforcement related so there are a few more odd requirements like fingerprint and background checks but it really beats me why they ask for a photo - they're going to get plenty from the background anyhow.


Interesting.  That makes sense.  Thanks!
 
2013-05-02 11:29:33 AM

dragonchild: Target Builder: Gen Y got rounded into the Millennials due to the short window between the end of Gen X (~1980) and the beginning of when kids/teenagers started growing up with the internet as a ubiquitous presence in their lives (Born ~87 onwards).

This.  Boomers liked it when everyone was categorized by age groups (probably to distinguish themselves), but there was a HUGE paradigm shift in the 1990s.  The proliferation of the Internet was a historical event, so it was far more relevant than being a number of years younger than the Boomers.

Lately I don't see much of a distinction between Gen X and Millenial in terms of what year you were born.  If you were using the Internet daily before you stopped growing, you're a Millenial.


Wow, I didn't think the term "Millenial" could become any more nebulous than it already was, but you managed to do it.
 
2013-05-02 12:27:16 PM

hungryhungryhorus: Wow, I didn't think the term "Millenial" could become any more nebulous than it already was, but you managed to do it.


Good.  I don't think these things should be clear-cut.  There were plenty of newsworthy events between 1968 and 2001, but what does Gen X have for a defining moment?  Reaganomics?
 
2013-05-02 12:35:17 PM

dragonchild: hungryhungryhorus: Wow, I didn't think the term "Millenial" could become any more nebulous than it already was, but you managed to do it.

Good.  I don't think these things should be clear-cut.  There were plenty of newsworthy events between 1968 and 2001, but what does Gen X have for a defining moment?  Reaganomics?


When I think Gen X I think American Psycho.
 
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