If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Guardian)   3D printing has hit its "tipping point" and could soon be available to many households the world over for people with a flair for design   (guardian.co.uk) divider line 138
    More: Interesting, tipping points, thin layers, industrial revolution, mechatronics, Kickstarter, digitizations, research directors, ceramics  
•       •       •

3196 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 May 2013 at 1:31 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



138 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-01 10:22:19 PM  

SockMonkeyHolocaust: I am trying to figure out a reason why anyone in middle America would want one of these beyond making homemade dildos and pocket pussies.


You're lack of understanding probably stems from your nature - that of a consumer, not a maker.
 
2013-05-01 10:39:00 PM  

Stone Meadow: HotIgneous Intruder: No. Because everything you print that you didn't design yourself is a copyright violation.

You're not that far off from the truth. A couple of makers of high end 3d printers own the patents for high-fidelity printing, which they refuse to license to consumer grade devices. It's as if home computers were still stuck using 286 chips and floppies.


Maybe they'll start putting them in Kinko's, until the tech gets loosened up, and the price drops.
If I had a pot to piss in, and a window to throw it out of, I'd get a nice machine, and make things for people.
 
2013-05-01 11:03:57 PM  
I have two 3D printers in my lab at work and I'm lecturing at a national conference in July about this technology. This stuff is very very far from "tipping point" technology. The cost is radically prohibitive. Until there are open standards for resin or DLSM or DLSP become mainstream standards, the per-part costs will remain crazy high.
 
2013-05-01 11:15:43 PM  

Elmo Jones: Stone Meadow: HotIgneous Intruder: No. Because everything you print that you didn't design yourself is a copyright violation.

You're not that far off from the truth. A couple of makers of high end 3d printers own the patents for high-fidelity printing, which they refuse to license to consumer grade devices. It's as if home computers were still stuck using 286 chips and floppies.

Maybe they'll start putting them in Kinko's, until the tech gets loosened up, and the price drops.
If I had a pot to piss in, and a window to throw it out of, I'd get a nice machine, and make things for people.




Staples is putting them in stores now.
 
2013-05-01 11:17:47 PM  

whatshisname: It'll be $49.99 for the printer and $3000 for 16ml of that plastic resin.


Not anymore
 
2013-05-01 11:51:48 PM  

mr lawson: whatshisname: It'll be $49.99 for the printer and $3000 for 16ml of that plastic resin.

Not anymore


That's not resin, it's filament.  Filament already runs as low as $15 per KG, which actually goes a long way.  Unfortunately, filament printing won't give you the high resolution people want for a finished look...it very much looks 3d printed.  The resin he's referring to is light curable epoxy, which enables MUCH better resolution and will cost quite a bit for some time to come.
 
2013-05-01 11:55:36 PM  

Rezurok: mr lawson: whatshisname: It'll be $49.99 for the printer and $3000 for 16ml of that plastic resin.

Not anymore

That's not resin, it's filament.  Filament already runs as low as $15 per KG, which actually goes a long way.  Unfortunately, filament printing won't give you the high resolution people want for a finished look...it very much looks 3d printed.  The resin he's referring to is light curable epoxy, which enables MUCH better resolution and will cost quite a bit for some time to come.


have you tried a light acetone vapor bath after printing? Makes it look very smooth.
 
2013-05-02 12:06:44 AM  
This is the year of 3D desktop printing!
Since our 3D printers only run Linux it is also the year of Linux on the desktop!



Wake me when they can build an entire appliance.
 
2013-05-02 12:09:38 AM  

Stone Meadow: Quantum Apostrophe: Funny how when technology advances it makes certain things obsolete....

But not 3D printing. We'll live in a solid-state digital world with no moving parts because moving parts are so old-fashioned and obsolete...

Except for 3D printers! Then moving parts are fun again!

I understand your point, QA, but don't jump to conclusions too quickly. As someone pointed out above, wrt to 3d printing we are about where we were with PCs 30 years ago. A more prosaic example of technological persistence is the automobile. Here is a Ford from a century ago...yes, a 1913 Ford Model T.

[oldcarbrochures.org image 850x637]

And here is the control suite of a 1913 Model T...

[upload.wikimedia.org image 640x480]

A driver from a century ago could climb into a 2013 Ford Focus (a modern Model T, arguably) and drive away in it without more than a moment of instruction on how to start the engine. Sure, a lot of the underlying specifics have changed, but the device as a whole is so universally useful that it continues to be made, used and improved upon ubiquitously.

I have a strong feeling computers and, yes, 3d printers will prove as durable.


Actually the model T's gearbox was not anything like a modern car.

A model T owner would be quite bewildered by the concept of an automatic gearbox.
 
2013-05-02 12:12:25 AM  

fluffy2097: Wake me when they can build an entire appliance.


how about parts?
 
2013-05-02 12:25:17 AM  

mr lawson: fluffy2097: Wake me when they can build an entire appliance.

how about parts?


oh yes. I'm sure that one will be on my desktop next week.

Idiot.
 
2013-05-02 12:55:32 AM  

HempHead: Staples is putting them in stores now.


There goes another million dollars.
:-(
 
2013-05-02 12:56:36 AM  

fluffy2097: oh yes. I'm sure that one will be on my desktop next week.

Idiot.


next week..no
Maybe in a few years...maybe
 
2013-05-02 01:13:38 AM  

Stone Meadow: What's wrong with your reading comprehension? No part of that agrees generally with QA about 3d printing. It is clearly defined as my assessment of current consumer grade 3d printing.


Communicating poorly then acting smug when people misunderstand you is pretty douchey behavior, son. Just going from your initial post, it's really hard to tell whether you're agreeing with QA just about current consumer grade 3d printing or whether you're agreeing with him generally about 3d printing.

Anyway, we don't actually seem to disagree. Right now home 3d printing is in its infancy and about as impressive as the first generation of home computers, give it a couple of decades and who knows? We went from this:

upload.wikimedia.org

To this:

upload.wikimedia.org

Pretty quickly. It doesn't sound far-fetched to me that in a generation or so home 3d printers could print with the same resolution as commercial 3d printers can right now, possibly in multiple materials (something conductive that would allow for basic circuitry, for instance). I suspect that would be a technology about as game-changing as the internet or smartphones, and I don't think that I'm being some crazy pie-in-the-sky technophile optimist for thinking that, like QA seems to believe.
 
2013-05-02 02:18:40 AM  

KellyX: greed, I did feel it was a crock of shiat and I did contact the mod and was told I should just place him on ignore...




Dems the rules here.

Headline is perfectly acceptable.

/knows nothing
//not over it
 
2013-05-02 02:25:08 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: How many people still even use printers that much in the era of iPhones and tablets and e-ink and whatnot?


Sorry. Sorry. Please, let me breathe. I'm laughing so, so hard at this comment.
 
2013-05-02 02:35:11 AM  

fluffy2097: Actually the model T's gearbox was not anything like a modern car.

A model T owner would be quite bewildered by the concept of an automatic gearbox.


Probably no more bewildered that they were when they figured out a planetary gearbox.
 
2013-05-02 02:41:03 AM  

Quantum Apostrophe: Uncle Tractor: As we all know, 3d printers will forever stay at the level they are right now. There will be no further advancements of that technology.

[i560.photobucket.com image 400x304]

As we all know, further advancements in technology will not make 3D printing obsolete.

ProfessorOhki: C'mon, when you need to print 5 of something, do you use your home inkjet/laser, see if you can buy paper that already has the right words on it, or send a copy of your master off to a printer to have plates made and a press brought up?

Funny how we always end up comparing completely different things. Putting drops of paint on a piece of paper was easy. Do you not see the difference here? How much structural integrity is demanded from a 2D printout?

How many people still even use printers that much in the era of iPhones and tablets and e-ink and whatnot?

Funny how when technology advances it makes certain things obsolete....

But not 3D printing. We'll live in a solid-state digital world with no moving parts because moving parts are so old-fashioned and obsolete...

Except for 3D printers! Then moving parts are fun again!


For all the 'funny' you don't seem to have much of a sense of amusement.
 
2013-05-02 02:42:15 AM  

Gunther: Pretty quickly. It doesn't sound far-fetched to me that in a generation or so home 3d printers could print with the same resolution as commercial 3d printers can right now, possibly in multiple materials (something conductive that would allow for basic circuitry, for instance). I suspect that would be a technology about as game-changing as the internet or smartphones, and I don't think that I'm being some crazy pie-in-the-sky technophile optimist for thinking that, like QA seems to believe.


Can I tell a 3D printer to make me a watch, customised to my needs, or a piece of custom jewellery? And not  a bunch of parts - a finished product.

The thing with computers is that all they do is process data from a limited set of inputs and output to a limited set of outputs. An app for entering a tax return or Angry Birds use the same physical IO and the same building blocks. It means they're universally adaptable, which is why computers are so powerful. The closest thing in the real world to software is lego - fitting together is "plug", removing is "unplug" and it's all the same material with a simple connector. But the real world isn't like that. How do you join plastic to metal? Or Metal to wood? You're going to have a machine that does all those aspects of real-world manufacturing, and that isn't going to shrink any more than inkjet printers can shrink beyond the size of a piece of A4.
 
2013-05-02 02:44:52 AM  

hardinparamedic: Quantum Apostrophe: How many people still even use printers that much in the era of iPhones and tablets and e-ink and whatnot?

Sorry. Sorry. Please, let me breathe. I'm laughing so, so hard at this comment.


It's all about the cloud now, haven't you heard?
 
2013-05-02 02:53:38 AM  

mr lawson: Rezurok: mr lawson: whatshisname: It'll be $49.99 for the printer and $3000 for 16ml of that plastic resin.

Not anymore

That's not resin, it's filament.  Filament already runs as low as $15 per KG, which actually goes a long way.  Unfortunately, filament printing won't give you the high resolution people want for a finished look...it very much looks 3d printed.  The resin he's referring to is light curable epoxy, which enables MUCH better resolution and will cost quite a bit for some time to come.

have you tried a light acetone vapor bath after printing? Makes it look very smooth.


Nah, I don't care much about appearance...I'm a tinkerer, not an artist :p

fluffy2097: This is the year of 3D desktop printing!
Since our 3D printers only run Linux it is also the year of Linux on the desktop!


Wake me when they can build an entire appliance.


They seem to work just fine with windows, fark linux.  And who needs appliances when you can print this?  http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:61796
 
2013-05-02 02:58:10 AM  

farkeruk: it's all the same material with a simple connector.


Code is not a bunch of identical bricks, nor are lego creations for that matter.
 
2013-05-02 02:59:50 AM  

Rezurok: And who needs appliances when you can print this?


Too bad an advanced artificial intelligence system was not in the requirements for a ceiling lamp. Maybe we can hook it up to the HVAC.
 
2013-05-02 03:20:52 AM  

farkeruk: Can I tell a 3D printer to make me a watch, customised to my needs, or a piece of custom jewellery? And not  a bunch of parts - a finished product.


There's an absurd amount of custom jewelry, but no working watches that I'm aware of. People were  printing full size clocks a couple years ago, although some assembly was required at the time. Right now there's been a lot of advances with people making stuff with working parts straight from the 3d printer with no assembly, I'm actually rather curious if someone's managed to make a clock that way yet.

...But anyway, I'm going off on a tangent; the point isn't that the tech is particularly impressive or world-changing  now (it isn't), but rather that it has the potential to become so in a few decades.
 
2013-05-02 06:27:26 AM  

ProfessorOhki: Dracolich: Quantum Apostrophe: Then the usual excuses of "yeah but some expensive industrial process that requires three-phase power and a staff of engineers to run is like 3D printing, therefore my glue gun on a stepper motor at home is just the same!" are equally absurd. What is difficult to understand or believe about this?

Since when is three-phase power not a household thing? Also, it's clear you're not an engineer.

In 'murica. AFAIK, it's three phase LV grid, but with single phase 240V drops to homes, split with neutral mid. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.


You are correct. 3-phase is only really applicable to high power motors in industry. The complexity increase in wiring houses with 3-phase would overshadow the benefits of using a 3-phase motor in your washing machine or furnace.
 
2013-05-02 09:19:18 AM  

Rezurok: mr lawson: whatshisname: It'll be $49.99 for the printer and $3000 for 16ml of that plastic resin.

Not anymore

That's not resin, it's filament.  Filament already runs as low as $15 per KG, which actually goes a long way.  Unfortunately, filament printing won't give you the high resolution people want for a finished look...it very much looks 3d printed.  The resin he's referring to is light curable epoxy, which enables MUCH better resolution and will cost quite a bit for some time to come.


DLP doesn't necessarily have higher resolution that FDM. Further, the larger your object the worse DLP thanks to optics. I good filament based machine can easily print <100 micron layers with an amazing finish. Most people don't bother, though, since it takes considerably longer to finish a print with at layer height and the tradeoff is time vs. quality.

At $15/kg for filament you will regret ever buying it. Things like dimensional tolerance and moisture content are absolutely critical for good results. Or any results, for that matter.

Resin is about $45/liter. In terms of print output it's roughly on par with good quality filament ($30/kg)
=Smidge=
 
2013-05-02 09:46:20 AM  

fluffy2097: Stone Meadow: Actually the model T's gearbox was not anything like a modern car.

A model T owner would be quite bewildered by the concept of an automatic gearbox.


A base model Focus has a 5-sp manual 'box, which a Model T driver would have no serious issues operating. And yes, a T's clutch and pedals operate differently to today's cars, but it's nothing one wouldn't catch onto in a moment. I learned to drive a 40's Farmall with T-style pedals and column mounted throttle and spark advance. The transition to a '52 Chevy pickup and later the family car presented no difficulties whatsoever. The larger point remains that even in a rapidly evolving technological environment some technologies will remain persistent long after many of their contemporaries disappear. The form factor may change. Indeed, even the underlying technology may change, but some things are just so useful they will be around for as long as we are.
 
2013-05-02 10:03:57 AM  

Gunther: Stone Meadow: What's wrong with your reading comprehension? No part of that agrees generally with QA about 3d printing. It is clearly defined as my assessment of current consumer grade 3d printing.

Communicating poorly then acting smug when people misunderstand you is pretty douchey behavior, son. Just going from your initial post, it's really hard to tell whether you're agreeing with QA just about current consumer grade 3d printing or whether you're agreeing with him generally about 3d printing.

seems to believe.


You grossly misinterpreted my simple declarative sentence, and then persisted when I highlighted where you went awry, and I'm the douchey one? How about this?

almostdumb.com
Oh, and unless you're well into your 80's don't call me son. I'm about to start on my 7th decade.
 
2013-05-02 10:21:51 AM  

Uncle Tractor: As we all know, 3d printers will forever stay at the level they are right now. There will be no further advancements of that technology.

i182.photobucket.com
Approves!
/hot
 
2013-05-02 10:49:39 AM  

UsikFark: Probably no more bewildered that they were when they figured out a planetary gearbox.


Something like a Smart car would probably scare the jebus out of them though, it changes gear all by itself (other than reverse) as it needs to.   But it'd be a technological marvel scare than the "jesus H christ pick one you farking machine" annoyance Smart drivers often get (at least those with the smaller engined ones, the 750cc's are fine).

I think they'd quickly figure out that D meant Drive forward when faced with a normal automatic.
 
2013-05-02 11:08:21 AM  

Smidge204: Rezurok: mr lawson: whatshisname: It'll be $49.99 for the printer and $3000 for 16ml of that plastic resin.

Not anymore

That's not resin, it's filament.  Filament already runs as low as $15 per KG, which actually goes a long way.  Unfortunately, filament printing won't give you the high resolution people want for a finished look...it very much looks 3d printed.  The resin he's referring to is light curable epoxy, which enables MUCH better resolution and will cost quite a bit for some time to come.

DLP doesn't necessarily have higher resolution that FDM. Further, the larger your object the worse DLP thanks to optics. I good filament based machine can easily print <100 micron layers with an amazing finish. Most people don't bother, though, since it takes considerably longer to finish a print with at layer height and the tradeoff is time vs. quality.

At $15/kg for filament you will regret ever buying it. Things like dimensional tolerance and moisture content are absolutely critical for good results. Or any results, for that matter.

Resin is about $45/liter. In terms of print output it's roughly on par with good quality filament ($30/kg)
=Smidge=


Well, it's what I use, and the dimensional accuracy has been great so far...no problems at all with moisture either.  Can't say I regret buying it *shrug*

And where can you get resin for $45?  I was considering playing with a DLP setup but the cost of print material had me running the other way.
 
2013-05-02 11:27:53 AM  

Rezurok: Well, it's what I use, and the dimensional accuracy has been great so far...no problems at all with moisture either. Can't say I regret buying it *shrug*


I'd like to see some of your prints. When I say "dimensional accuracy" I'm referring to the filament, not the print. Changes in the diameter, or being oval in cross-section, can make it very difficult to get good results and impossible to get great results.

And where can you get resin for $45? I was considering playing with a DLP setup but the cost of print material had me running the other way.

http://makerjuice.com/  (No affiliation)
=Smidge=
 
2013-05-02 01:02:58 PM  

Smidge204: Rezurok: Well, it's what I use, and the dimensional accuracy has been great so far...no problems at all with moisture either. Can't say I regret buying it *shrug*

I'd like to see some of your prints. When I say "dimensional accuracy" I'm referring to the filament, not the print. Changes in the diameter, or being oval in cross-section, can make it very difficult to get good results and impossible to get great results.

And where can you get resin for $45? I was considering playing with a DLP setup but the cost of print material had me running the other way.

http://makerjuice.com/  (No affiliation)
=Smidge=


Hah, unfortunately seeing my prints would do little to tell you the quality of the filament...I don't have everything dialed in for quality yet, since to make the plastic parts I first built a small CNC, then milled an extruder, and I now have a wooden extruder with a hot end made with a drill press jury rigged to an otherwise prusa reprap frame. It works acceptably to make functional parts, but until I get my final extruder and hot-end on there I'm not gonna spend a lot of time trying to make things pretty.  My statements on dimensional accuracy come from measuring quite a bit of the filament with a micrometer...the variance was negligible, within a percent or so, and I haven't had any popping or defects due to moisture.  Maybe I'll find myself hating the filament once the source of defects isn't my own bodges, but thus far I have no complaints.
 
2013-05-02 02:19:17 PM  
Stone Meadow:You grossly misinterpreted my simple declarative sentence, and then persisted when I highlighted where you went awry, and I'm the douchey one?

Yes?

You phrased a post in a way that made it look like you were agreeing with someone that you apparently didn't agree with, then when I responded to you you refused to clarify yourself in a smug, douchey way. And now you're posting meme cats. I don't care if you're fifteen or a hundred and fifty, you're still kind of a douche.

Anyway, we apparently don't actually disagree on this topic at all (or at least; you aren't as interested in the topic as you are in this pointless back-and-forth shiat), and an argument over which of us is a douche sounds amazingly boring, so... bye.
 
2013-05-02 03:07:24 PM  

Stone Meadow: And yes, a T's clutch and pedals operate differently to today's cars, but it's nothing one wouldn't catch onto in a moment.


I'm sure the operator's manual will indicate which level is the velocitator and which is the deceleratrix, hm?
 
2013-05-02 03:22:29 PM  

poot_rootbeer: Stone Meadow: And yes, a T's clutch and pedals operate differently to today's cars, but it's nothing one wouldn't catch onto in a moment.

I'm sure the operator's manual will indicate which level is the velocitator and which is the deceleratrix, hm?


It isn't any great shakes...the three-pedal system we use today (in conventional manual trans cars) is based on that of the T...with a few refinements. Back in the day everyone who replaced their T with an Olds, a Chevy or an A transitioned effortlessly.

BTW, my great-granddad was still driving his '24 T pickup in the late 50's when I was a kid. It was only about 35 years old at the time, about like a 1980 car today.
 
2013-05-02 04:52:49 PM  
Nuts to 3-d printers... I think my next project will have to be a useful 3-d scanner.
 
2013-05-02 09:27:02 PM  

maxheck: Nuts to 3-d printers... I think my next project will have to be a useful 3-d scanner.


Well, I suppose that's one thing you could do with the scanner/printer combo...
 
Displayed 38 of 138 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report