If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Yahoo)   New documentary claims to have found Green Beret who was captured during the Vietnam war, escaped, but then never tried to return to his wife and kids in the US and instead settled in Vietnam, and "forgot" English. Seems legit   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 53
    More: Repeat, English, Vietnam, North Vietnam, documentary  
•       •       •

6806 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 May 2013 at 11:42 AM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



53 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-05-01 11:38:32 AM
We have a 'Repeat' tag now? Musta had my head up my ass lately...
 
2013-05-01 11:42:31 AM
I read this the other day.

I found it very interesting.
 
2013-05-01 11:46:58 AM
 
2013-05-01 11:47:45 AM
Diddy Mao!!!

thefilmexperience.net


/ Đi đi mau: slang Vietnamese for "go quickly".
 
2013-05-01 11:48:50 AM
okay so, no DNA test, can't remember personal details that this guy should know, and "can't remember" his mother tongue?  Yeah...I'm gonna let the Romulan Ambassador take this one
 
2013-05-01 11:49:35 AM
I heard it's BS, but it's caught my interest anyway I wanna see it!
 
2013-05-01 11:52:30 AM
after hearing my dad's account of his tour of duty in Viet Nam I can't imagine anyone falling in love with the place so much that they had to stay.
 
2013-05-01 11:55:14 AM
Why won't the family give DNA samples?, and if you are the filmaker why not ask to use the bathroom and steal some hair off a comb or something.
 
2013-05-01 11:57:03 AM

Magorn: okay so, no DNA test, can't remember personal details that this guy should know, and "can't remember" his mother tongue?  Yeah...I'm gonna let the Romulan Ambassador take this one


under a mountain: Why won't the family give DNA samples?, and if you are the filmaker why not ask to use the bathroom and steal some hair off a comb or something.


Apparently he was DNA tested years ago.  It's not him. *shrug*
 
2013-05-01 11:58:06 AM
Murdoch....I'm coming for YOU.
 
2013-05-01 11:59:33 AM

Kyoki: http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/463271/20130501/vietnam-fraud-forgo t ten-veteran-john-hartley-exposed.htm

Bullshiat.


Over in three.
 
2013-05-01 12:00:05 PM
 Everyone thinks its BS, and maybe in this case it is, but this actually happened more than the US Army wanted to admit. Its not all that far fetched, and if its a made-up story its one based on fact.
 Brainwashing, torture, and long captivity can turn people into shells of themselves, and that was a very farked up war.
 
2013-05-01 12:00:18 PM

Langdon Alger: after hearing my dad's account of his tour of duty in Viet Nam I can't imagine anyone falling in love with the place so much that they had to stay.


Especially at that time. I hear good things about it now though.
 
2013-05-01 12:02:01 PM

10 Cent: I heard it's BS, but it's caught my interest anyway I wanna see it!


Kyoki's link is all you need to see. Not interesting at all once you read it. It's just an old con man scamming vets while trying to get on the US gov. dole.
 
2013-05-01 12:02:29 PM

Kyoki: http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/463271/20130501/vietnam-fraud-forgo t ten-veteran-john-hartley-exposed.htm

Bullshiat.


So he's a POS, not a POW.
 
2013-05-01 12:07:25 PM
CliChe Guevara:  Everyone thinks its BS, and maybe because in this case it is, but this actually never happened more than the US Army wanted to admit. It's not all that very far fetched. and if its a made-up story its one based on fact.
 Brainwashing, torture, and long captivity can turn people into shells of themselves, and that was a very farked up war.


FTFY
 
2013-05-01 12:10:04 PM
Another one?
 
2013-05-01 12:11:33 PM

Magorn: okay so, no DNA test, can't remember personal details that this guy should know, and "can't remember" his mother tongue?  Yeah...I'm gonna let the Romulan Ambassador take this one


I didn't read tfa and don't have an opinion on this guy's veracity....BUT...I do recall the Russians repatriating some Japanese WW2 captives some years back after 60ish years of living in Russia. Not one could understand basic questions in Japanese, much less answer in the language.

Interesting.
 
2013-05-01 12:11:34 PM
hisvorpal.files.wordpress.com

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com Real Name: Nguyen Minh Triet
 
2013-05-01 12:15:02 PM

Stone Meadow: Magorn: okay so, no DNA test, can't remember personal details that this guy should know, and "can't remember" his mother tongue?  Yeah...I'm gonna let the Romulan Ambassador take this one

I didn't read tfa and don't have an opinion on this guy's veracity....BUT...I do recall the Russians repatriating some Japanese WW2 captives some years back after 60ish years of living in Russia. Not one could understand basic questions in Japanese, much less answer in the language.

Interesting.


That is interesting, I'd always read that your natal language was more or less hardwired into your brain and the very last thing to go even in dementia patients
 
2013-05-01 12:15:16 PM
Fake - he's actually Elvis but he can't reveal his identity because of the CIA moon bases.
 
2013-05-01 12:16:23 PM
I read the article.
I played the video at the bottom
Stopped the video when I saw it was produced by Myth Merchant Films.
Decided my time will be better served trolling LinkedIn.


/ these are actual events that happened to said Farker
 
2013-05-01 12:18:09 PM
Here's a picture of the guy who claims to be the Green Beret.

i.dailymail.co.uk

Here's a picture of Sgt. Robertson.

i.dailymail.co.uk

C'mon, they look nothing alike.
 
2013-05-01 12:19:50 PM

Magorn: the very last thing to go even in dementia patients


I thought the last thing to go is your ability to coordinate your tongue and throat muscles to swallow.
 
2013-05-01 12:30:48 PM

Chaghatai: FTFY


One of the reasons rumors of POW's left behind in Vietnam lasted for so long was due to a number of factors, not the least of which were those that chose to stay behind in Vietnam. This, along with defectors (yes, there were some), AWOL's, and the very real probability that Vietnam held back and hid some prisoners at the end of the war.

In both Korea and Vietnam, if you look at the governments numbers of POW's, a very small category are those that simply refused to return after the war. Of their own volition.

Just because this guy is a con artist doesn't make the story itself so far-fetched.
 
2013-05-01 12:33:56 PM

Magorn: Stone Meadow: Magorn: okay so, no DNA test, can't remember personal details that this guy should know, and "can't remember" his mother tongue?  Yeah...I'm gonna let the Romulan Ambassador take this one

I didn't read tfa and don't have an opinion on this guy's veracity....BUT...I do recall the Russians repatriating some Japanese WW2 captives some years back after 60ish years of living in Russia. Not one could understand basic questions in Japanese, much less answer in the language.

Interesting.

That is interesting, I'd always read that your natal language was more or less hardwired into your brain and the very last thing to go even in dementia patients


I should have specified the circumstances. The several old guys were at a hastily arranged news conference when their flight arrived in Tokyo. The reporters were shouting questions at them in Japanese, which would cause the guys to look at each other and then wait for a translator to repeat the question in Russian, whereupon they would answer in Russian. I think one guy attempted to stammer out a short answer in Japanese, but he couldn't be understood, so switched back to Russian.

I have been bilingual all my life, so am fascinated by things like this. I notice that when I go a while thinking and talking in just one language the other one recedes a bit, and vice versa. Other bilingual friends say the same thing.
 
2013-05-01 12:37:37 PM

Stone Meadow: Magorn: Stone Meadow: Magorn: okay so, no DNA test, can't remember personal details that this guy should know, and "can't remember" his mother tongue?  Yeah...I'm gonna let the Romulan Ambassador take this one

I didn't read tfa and don't have an opinion on this guy's veracity....BUT...I do recall the Russians repatriating some Japanese WW2 captives some years back after 60ish years of living in Russia. Not one could understand basic questions in Japanese, much less answer in the language.

Interesting.

That is interesting, I'd always read that your natal language was more or less hardwired into your brain and the very last thing to go even in dementia patients

I should have specified the circumstances. The several old guys were at a hastily arranged news conference when their flight arrived in Tokyo. The reporters were shouting questions at them in Japanese, which would cause the guys to look at each other and then wait for a translator to repeat the question in Russian, whereupon they would answer in Russian. I think one guy attempted to stammer out a short answer in Japanese, but he couldn't be understood, so switched back to Russian.

I have been bilingual all my life, so am fascinated by things like this. I notice that when I go a while thinking and talking in just one language the other one recedes a bit, and vice versa. Other bilingual friends say the same thing.


My ability to speak the language of my birth (Chinese) is pretty rusty. It bites that I have nobody to really talk to in Chinese over here to keep it up besides my parents.
 
2013-05-01 12:38:18 PM

CliChe Guevara: Chaghatai: FTFY

One of the reasons rumors of POW's left behind in Vietnam lasted for so long was due to a number of factors, not the least of which were those that chose to stay behind in Vietnam. This, along with defectors (yes, there were some), AWOL's, and the very real probability that Vietnam held back and hid some prisoners at the end of the war.

In both Korea and Vietnam, if you look at the governments numbers of POW's, a very small category are those that simply refused to return after the war. Of their own volition.

Just because this guy is a con artist doesn't make the story itself so far-fetched.


Check out the documentary, Crossing the Line.  It's about 5 or 6 American soldiers who defected to N. Korea during the Korean conflict in the 50's.  Bizarre but interesting.


encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com
 
2013-05-01 12:42:39 PM
So... the Repeat tag is a chance to show off better headlines?
 
2013-05-01 12:57:09 PM
This particular case may be fake, but I think it is definitely possible to substantially forget your native tongue. I work with a native born Serbian who moved to the U.S. in his early 20's, not knowing much English, for a computer science career. 17 years of permanent legal residency later, he tells me that he has significant trouble understanding his parents on the phone. He thinks in English, and translating into Serbian is an ever more difficult and fading skill.
Also his Serbian friends' cultural and political priorities seem awkward and foreign to him now. I can easily imagine that 40 years would make the problem exponentially worse, especially for a 70 year old with other cognitive issues.
 
2013-05-01 12:57:30 PM
The horror.
 
2013-05-01 12:59:57 PM

ThrobblefootSpectre: This particular case may be fake, but I think it is definitely possible to substantially forget your native tongue. I work with a native born Serbian who moved to the U.S. in his early 20's, not knowing much English, for a computer science career. 17 years of permanent legal residency later, he tells me that he has significant trouble understanding his parents on the phone. He thinks in English, and translating into Serbian is an ever more difficult and fading skill.
Also his Serbian friends' cultural and political priorities seem awkward and foreign to him now. I can easily imagine that 40 years would make the problem exponentially worse, especially for a 70 year old with other cognitive issues.


There's just no way that's true, sorry.
 
2013-05-01 01:06:16 PM

RexTalionis: Magorn: the very last thing to go even in dementia patients

I thought the last thing to go is your ability to coordinate your tongue and throat muscles to swallow.


It's kind of like "the last thing to go through a bug's mind when he hits your windshield at 70 mph".
 
2013-05-01 01:07:47 PM
Evoke, no need to apologize to me. Ill let him know you think he's lying for some reason.
 
2013-05-01 01:08:33 PM
i406.photobucket.com
 
2013-05-01 01:25:09 PM
this seems like M. Moore
if you don't really have a story but WANT a movie to make money
you just make shiat up as you go
 
2013-05-01 01:28:05 PM

evoke: ThrobblefootSpectre: This particular case may be fake, but I think it is definitely possible to substantially forget your native tongue. I work with a native born Serbian who moved to the U.S. in his early 20's, not knowing much English, for a computer science career. 17 years of permanent legal residency later, he tells me that he has significant trouble understanding his parents on the phone. He thinks in English, and translating into Serbian is an ever more difficult and fading skill.
Also his Serbian friends' cultural and political priorities seem awkward and foreign to him now. I can easily imagine that 40 years would make the problem exponentially worse, especially for a 70 year old with other cognitive issues.

There's just no way that's true, sorry.


Another anecdote.

My dad was born the former Yugoslavia to an ethnic German family (so he spoke German) and learned Serbian and Hungarian from school friends and neighbors. He came to the US at the age of 24, and after his arrival never spoke Serbian and Hungarian conversationally again. He's now in his 80s and retired for a quite a while, but long time ago mentioned that he could no longer understand more than a handful of words used by the ethnic Serbs and Hungarians in the machinist shop where he worked. In contrast, my grandfather had been fluent in five languages (German, Serbian, Hungarian, Romanian, and later English) and could still carry on conversations in any of those languages until he was in his late 80s.

Hell, I used to be able to handle conversational French pretty well in my early 20s, but now that I'm in my late 40s I have to struggle to understand more than simple sentences, never mind respond.

Some folks have a gift for languages. For others, if they don't use it, they lose it. Why should that be so hard to accept?
 
2013-05-01 01:45:44 PM
www.cageyfilms.com

Eh, I can think of a few reasons to hang around...
 
2013-05-01 02:14:28 PM
i40.tinypic.com

first clue that it's bullshiat?
 
2013-05-01 02:36:13 PM

Stone Meadow: I didn't read tfa and don't have an opinion on this guy's veracity....BUT...I do recall the Russians repatriating some Japanese WW2 captives some years back after 60ish years of living in Russia. Not one could understand basic questions in Japanese, much less answer in the language.

Interesting.


How much "captive" were they, though?  Actual soldiers, or...?

Lots of Japanese kids were left overseas in the former colonies after the war (parents killed, they're lost, basically) and so they grew up as foreigners.  Lots of them in China, grew up as Chinese, happy to stay Chinese mostly, some had reunions with family, others not. Similarly kids left in Siberia too.

Point being though if they were kids, yeah, it's normal they don't remember their parents' original language. Same thing happens to plenty of kids adopted (normally) to the US from abroad even when they're in elementary school.   Regular immigrant kids (who move with family) usually keep at least some language due to living with their parents (who usually stay more comfortable with their original language so that's what gets spoken in the house) but apparently even some of them can get pretty rusty.

It's all about how much you use it.  Also when it comes to kids, if they don't go to school in their "original" language often it lags because they're just stuck in household language, which doesn't necessarily have a wide vocabulary, doesn't always teach interaction with a wide variety of people (important for languages with honorific levels) etc.

Meanwhile don't forget there's those American soldiers who voluntarily defected to North Korea (one of them has since moved to Japan with his wife, who was one of the Japanese kidnap victims).  The guy who moved to Japan was on Japanese TV, he speaks English but just due to having low educational level originally anyway(elementary school?) it is the thickest country accent you can imagine, to the point I was thankful for the Japanese subtitles on the show.
 
2013-05-01 02:46:59 PM

Magorn: That is interesting, I'd always read that your natal language was more or less hardwired into your brain and the very last thing to go even in dementia patients


I suspect it probably has to do with just how competent you ever got in your natal language (or first language or whatever you want to call it). People who grew up to adults using language X and then immigrate to country Y probably never forget X, but definitely young kids will forget X.

Even when they don't forget X, it's a battle to keep skills in X at the same level that same-age kids back in country X have - EVEN IF the home language is still X (though it's easier if the parents truly 100% are monolingual in X).  Why? Because they are flooded with the community language all the time.

It's why parents send their kids to Saturday school.
 
2013-05-01 02:54:52 PM
Came for pictures of good-looking Vietnamese Chicky-Babes!!!


i1.kym-cdn.com
 
2013-05-01 02:58:56 PM
GungFu;
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comReal Name: Nguyen Minh Triet

Damn, and all this time I was thinking his Vietnamese name was Hu Flung Pu
 
2013-05-01 03:00:09 PM

itazurakko: Stone Meadow: I didn't read tfa and don't have an opinion on this guy's veracity....BUT...I do recall the Russians repatriating some Japanese WW2 captives some years back after 60ish years of living in Russia. Not one could understand basic questions in Japanese, much less answer in the language. Interesting.

How much "captive" were they, though?  Actual soldiers, or...?


Yes, Japanese soldiers captured in the Kurils at the end of the war, IIRC. Say, late teens or early 20's...not little kids.
 
2013-05-01 03:09:52 PM

Kyoki: http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/463271/20130501/vietnam-fraud-forgo t ten-veteran-john-hartley-exposed.htm

Bullshiat.


Hey thanks for that link.  I wonder if the filmmakers will pull the film now? Probably not.
 
2013-05-01 03:11:26 PM

OniExpress: Magorn: okay so, no DNA test, can't remember personal details that this guy should know, and "can't remember" his mother tongue?  Yeah...I'm gonna let the Romulan Ambassador take this one

under a mountain: Why won't the family give DNA samples?, and if you are the filmaker why not ask to use the bathroom and steal some hair off a comb or something.

Apparently he was DNA tested years ago.  It's not him. *shrug*


It was fingerprints from what I read yesterday, and then he confessed. That was in 1991, and he's still fleecing a few sheep a year out of a few bucks

It's a living, I guess
 
2013-05-01 03:12:55 PM

CliChe Guevara: Chaghatai: FTFY

One of the reasons rumors of POW's left behind in Vietnam lasted for so long was due to a number of factors, not the least of which were those that chose to stay behind in Vietnam. This, along with defectors (yes, there were some), AWOL's, and the very real probability that Vietnam held back and hid some prisoners at the end of the war.

In both Korea and Vietnam, if you look at the governments numbers of POW's, a very small category are those that simply refused to return after the war. Of their own volition.

Just because this guy is a con artist doesn't make the story itself so far-fetched.


The Vietnamese kept telling my cousin's wife that he was alive and well for years until they finally gave back his body. He had apparently been tortured and killed a few days after being shot down, but they let the poor woman have hopes that he would return to her (they didn't want to admit that they killed an unarmed recon pilot). I think the guy ended up getting two or three promotions after his death because nobody knew what the hell was going on. They were the lucky ones. Other families never even received the body, or final word as to the fate of their loved ones. That is the reason you still have rumors of POWs still being captive in Vietnam.

Chances are? Those POW/MIAs are KIAs. Plain and simple.
 
2013-05-01 04:40:39 PM

Stone Meadow: Yes, Japanese soldiers captured in the Kurils at the end of the war, IIRC. Say, late teens or early 20's...not little kids.


Interesting. Though I guess maybe still young enough, if they truly had no other Japanese speaking contacts for decades.

I'm bilingual and in my 40's, right now I can't imagine not speaking both my languages (can't remember ever not being bilingual, either) but I do use both languages all the time.  For what it's worth, that has gotten significantly easier in the last 15 years or so.  At this point I pretty much have access to any and all media from either country (yay first world places with huge media presence).

Ass end of the Soviet Union in the late 40's, not so much, but... still, that's pretty interesting, to lose it after late teens.  I guess that Serbian guy mentioned upthread would relate though.
 
2013-05-01 04:48:50 PM

Magorn: Stone Meadow: Magorn: okay so, no DNA test, can't remember personal details that this guy should know, and "can't remember" his mother tongue?  Yeah...I'm gonna let the Romulan Ambassador take this one

I didn't read tfa and don't have an opinion on this guy's veracity....BUT...I do recall the Russians repatriating some Japanese WW2 captives some years back after 60ish years of living in Russia. Not one could understand basic questions in Japanese, much less answer in the language.

Interesting.

That is interesting, I'd always read that your natal language was more or less hardwired into your brain and the very last thing to go even in dementia patients


My wife's uncle has a rather bad case of dementia, and while his original languages were hebrew, arabic and yiddish he can only speak in garbled english now.  I found that weird, for much the same reason, but it happens.  Dementia TENDS to regress a lot of things to early states, but it's really unpredictable.

/saddest two year observation i've seen
//used to work in a nursing home
 
2013-05-01 04:50:42 PM

MFAWG: It's a living, I guess


Basically.  $50 will get the guy a long while, in those parts of the world.  I find it to be despicable but understandable.  Desperate times, and all that.

/speaking of desperate times: all this articles about him
 
Displayed 50 of 53 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report