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(The Northwestern)   Family discovers fully stocked '50s era fallout shelter on their property. That should be a nice boost for their property value   (thenorthwestern.com) divider line 108
    More: Cool, property value  
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22173 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 May 2013 at 12:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-01 11:10:45 PM  

Coelacanth: jtown: When my grandparents built a house in the early 60s, part of the process involved installing a septic system.  Some nosy neighbor was absolutely convinced that it was a bomb shelter.  No amount of reality would dissuade her.  Like the fact that there was no way a family of four could possibly fit in a space the size of the tank.  And the only ways in or out once it was fully buried were the size of a big arm.

Some of my mother's cousins did build a bomb shelter in their backyard during the 1960s and the neighbors weren't too subtle about taking it away from them if something happened. During a false alarm in the early 1970s (a balloon floating over Los Angeles triggered NORAD's radar or some crap like that), about a hundred people tried to pile into a shelter built for six people. It took the fire department to pull all of them back out.
Too bad the neighbors didn't know about the shelter in the basement ;)


Heh.  That sounds like my "bait safe".  It's heavy but not too heavy for one strong person to carry.  There's also some worthless stuff inside to clunk around if they tip it.  My hope is a thief will grab that and make a run for it and won't take enough time to find my real goodies.  Spend hours busting through the four throws to find a brick, some scrap metal, and a couple other prizes.
 
2013-05-01 11:27:03 PM  
Coelacanth: Some of my mother's cousins did build a bomb shelter in their backyard during the 1960s and the neighbors weren't too subtle about taking it away from them if something happened. During a false alarm in the early 1970s (a balloon floating over Los Angeles triggered NORAD's radar or some crap like that), about a hundred people tried to pile into a shelter built for six people. It took the fire department to pull all of them back out.
 Too bad the neighbors didn't know about the shelter in the basement ;)

A decoy shelter? Smart.
 
2013-05-01 11:50:58 PM  

Coelacanth: Some of my mother's cousins did build a bomb shelter in their backyard during the 1960s and the neighbors weren't too subtle about taking it away from them if something happened. During a false alarm in the early 1970s (a balloon floating over Los Angeles triggered NORAD's radar or some crap like that), about a hundred people tried to pile into a shelter built for six people. It took the fire department to pull all of them back out.
Too bad the neighbors didn't know about the shelter in the basement ;)


Backs up my earlier comment, "A shelter is useless when everyone else, who hasn't got a shelter, knows where you are and that you've got food."

I'd probably say it is better to build a fairly good shelter than you can build in secret than a great everything proof bunker than all your neighbours will know about. Building a swimming pool and adding a room at the end under the patio would probably be a good way of disguising the excavation as long as no one got a close look. And the builders kept their mouth shut and didn't live in the area.
 
2013-05-02 12:12:03 AM  

lazymojo: Pocket Ninja: You know, some day in the far future, a desperately hungry man and his young boy may stumble across that long ruined property as they flee post-apocalyptic tribes of cannibals, stumble by chance upon that shelter, and die there in misery because its supplies are no longer there. Way to go, family.

Guess I'm the only one who got your reference to Cormac McCarthy's The Road.  Or at least "got it" and decided to post about it.


Nothing's obscure on Fark and there's no shortage of folks ready to blow smoke up their own asses for knowing it.
 
2013-05-02 09:15:55 AM  

jtown: Coelacanth: jtown: When my grandparents built a house in the early 60s, part of the process involved installing a septic system.  Some nosy neighbor was absolutely convinced that it was a bomb shelter.  No amount of reality would dissuade her.  Like the fact that there was no way a family of four could possibly fit in a space the size of the tank.  And the only ways in or out once it was fully buried were the size of a big arm.

Some of my mother's cousins did build a bomb shelter in their backyard during the 1960s and the neighbors weren't too subtle about taking it away from them if something happened. During a false alarm in the early 1970s (a balloon floating over Los Angeles triggered NORAD's radar or some crap like that), about a hundred people tried to pile into a shelter built for six people. It took the fire department to pull all of them back out.
Too bad the neighbors didn't know about the shelter in the basement ;)

Heh.  That sounds like my "bait safe".  It's heavy but not too heavy for one strong person to carry.  There's also some worthless stuff inside to clunk around if they tip it.  My hope is a thief will grab that and make a run for it and won't take enough time to find my real goodies.  Spend hours busting through the four throws to find a brick, some scrap metal, and a couple other prizes.


Just like my uncle's gun safe.  Big Bluff solid steel monstrosity bolted into the wall and floor joists.  Thing is it is basically empty except some steel pipes, rebar, and shell casings.  All of which are placed in there just to make noise in case someone can actually SHIFT the dang thing in an attempted theft.  A smaller, James-Bond/Bruce-Wayne-ish safe is hidden in his house with all of his actual weapons.
 
2013-05-02 09:32:47 AM  
SharkaPult:
Heh.  That sounds like my "bait safe".  It's heavy but not too heavy for one strong person to carry.  There's also some worthless stuff inside to clunk around if they tip it.  My hope is a thief will grab that and make a run for it and won't take enough time to find my real goodies.  Spend hours busting through the four throws to find a brick, some scrap metal, and a couple other prizes.

Just like my uncle's gun safe.  Big Bluff solid steel monstrosity bolted into the wall and floor joists.  Thing is it is basically empty except some steel pipes, rebar, and shell casings.  All of which are placed in there just to make noise in case someone can actually SHIFT the dang thing in an attempted theft.  A smaller, James-Bond/Bruce-Wayne-ish safe is hidden in his house with all of his actual weapons.


The problem with both of those is that by putting obvious decoy stuff in those safes if the burglars do manage to open it or even take them away and open them then they will know it was a decoy and there must be a real safe somewhere else. And if they get pissed off they could start beating the crap out of you.

Far better to put stuff in there that could be genuine, like life insurance papers a year or two out of date and a bunch of other important looking paperwork for the safe and maybe some genuine gun parts or an old weapon you don't mind losing with no matching ammo. That way the thieves will just think you didn't have anything worth stealing.
 
2013-05-02 02:23:49 PM  

Mose: This stuff's been on here since Korea!  This can expired in 1966!

What's the matter sir, it still tastes like creamed corn?

Except it's deviled ham!

/obscure?  I hope not


it is not (salutes)
underrated movie even if Kelsey grammer is a db
 
2013-05-02 02:25:50 PM  
Where the hell is Neenah?

/leaves feeling old and obscure.
 
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