If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Chicago Trib)   New college graduates disillusioned, underemployed according to survey done by consulting firm that off-shores work to India   (chicagotribune.com) divider line 106
    More: Obvious, college graduate, consulting firm  
•       •       •

1307 clicks; posted to Business » on 30 Apr 2013 at 8:15 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



106 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-04-30 08:29:29 PM
No shiat... not to mention the older generation refuses to retire.
 
2013-04-30 08:33:49 PM
FTFA: Only 15 percent of this year's graduates think they will earn less than $25,000

That is the very HEIGHT of entitlement. Who do these parasites think they are?
 
2013-04-30 08:36:45 PM
FTA: Only 15 percent of this year's graduates think they will earn less than $25,000 but a third of recent graduates said they make that amount or less.

$25k/year or less for 1/3 of college graduates? That's pretty goddamn pathetic. My first job out of college paid me $28k/year, and that was in 1989. And the state school was inexpensive enough that I was able to graduate without a penny in student loans. It's tough time to be attending college now.
 
2013-04-30 08:37:12 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: That is the very HEIGHT of entitlement. Who do these parasites think they are?


college graduates who were told throughout their young lives that if they goto school and work hard they

1. can expect to make more then that.
2. that earning that little makes you a worthless human being sucking on the government teat
 
2013-04-30 08:37:18 PM
"For our nation's youngest workers, as well as for the workforce at large, there is a real need for employers to reexamine how they hire, train and develop their employees," said Katherine Lavelle, of the global management consulting firm Accenture, which conducted the survey.

You mean like, I dunno, ACTUALLY TRAINING YOUR EMPLOYEES!? How about not insisting that we have 30 years experience in a skill that's only 5 years old? How about not requiring several years experience for an entrance farking level job!? How about firing your farking H.R. department, or physically READ resumes instead of making us play your version of buzzword bingo!? Oh, and here's one for the records, stop insisting we boil our entire life down into one page size 14 font double spaced!

/just sayin' here
 
2013-04-30 08:37:45 PM

AuralArgument: No shiat... not to mention the older generation refuses to retire.


With as little as most have saved for their retirement, they're just holding off the dog food diet for as long as they can.
 
2013-04-30 08:46:22 PM

Parkanzky: With as little as most have saved for their retirement, they're just holding off the dog food diet for as long as they can.


they should have been more boot-strapy like they keep telling the young kids.
they should be punished for their mistakes as they want youth punished.
 
2013-04-30 08:47:19 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: FTFA: Only 15 percent of this year's graduates think they will earn less than $25,000

That is the very HEIGHT of entitlement. Who do these parasites think they are?


Considering the line we ('06 grad here) got was that "the average college graduate makes $40,000 within a year of graduating"?

Dude, don't blame us for believing the lies you've been telling us since we were toddlers. We understand it's because you were told lies too, but it doesn't mean it's our fricking fault.
 
2013-04-30 08:50:16 PM

AuralArgument: college graduates who were told throughout their young lives that if they goto school and work hard they

1. can expect to make more then that.
2. that earning that little makes you a worthless human being sucking on the government teat


Even without conditioning by society at large that college = money and success, I think that's there's a reasonable expectation that a job that requires a college degree have a salary high enough to actually pay for the degree.

In my job search early last year, I interviewed with a company and came to find out they were offering minimum wage for a CS degree. Happy to say I had a better offer elsewhere.
 
2013-04-30 08:58:15 PM
All the n00bs get pwned trying to live their parents lifestyle right out of the gate.

Hell, even STEM are getting hurt.  My wife (RN) and me (EE) are 8 years out of college and just finally got a house and trying to build a nice life like my folks.  Slow and steady wins the race :)
 
2013-04-30 08:59:25 PM

Brontes: All the n00bs get pwned trying to live their parents lifestyle right out of the gate.


and many people's parents get pissed at them if they don't do such things.
 
2013-04-30 09:04:40 PM

AuralArgument: Brontes: All the n00bs get pwned trying to live their parents lifestyle right out of the gate.

and many people's parents get pissed at them if they don't do such things.


That's my and my fiancé's family. For two years we heard "But it's the American Dream to have the single-family household with 2.5 kids and a dog and white picket fence. . . " (of course totally glossing over the fact of how much of that scenario was supported by the gov't in the 50s)

It wasn't until 3 out of 4 of our parents ended up unemployed that, "OMG, finding a job is HARD!" and the compassion genes finally kicked in.
 
2013-04-30 09:04:58 PM

Brontes: All the n00bs get pwned trying to live their parents lifestyle right out of the gate.


Yeah, why would the expect such a thing when their parents were able to buy a house not long after graduating and getting married, or for that matter not going to college at all and still being able to afford a house.

Face it, we've been screwed by the boomers and the rich. The middle class is dead, or at least very much on the way there. What can't be outsourced is going to be so low paying that everybody that wasn't born into the good life can expect to struggle to get ahead, and struggle even more if they want to keep it.
 
2013-04-30 09:07:48 PM
FTA: "For our nation's youngest workers, as well as for the workforce at large, there is a real need for employers to reexamine how they hire, train and develop their employees," said Katherine Lavelle, of the global management consulting firm Accenture, which conducted the survey.

Why should they when congress in ready to hand out more work visas?
 
2013-04-30 09:11:15 PM
Just keep my tea glass filled and don't make me wait on the ticket and you'll earn more.
 
2013-04-30 09:11:57 PM

Brontes: Slow and steady wins the race :)


Exactly.
 
2013-04-30 09:13:02 PM
Brontes: All the n00bs get pwned trying to live their parents lifestyle right out of the gate.
 
Hell, even STEM are getting hurt.  My wife (RN) and me (EE) are 8 years out of college and just finally got a house and trying to build a nice life like my folks.  Slow and steady wins the race :)


The n00bs are graduating college with the equivalent of a house payment per month in student loan debt. That combined with abysmal wages or job prospects even for things like STEM means the n00bs will have little to no chance, however slow and steady they may be, to work their way up to their parents' lifestyle.
 
2013-04-30 09:13:05 PM

ajgeek: "For our nation's youngest workers, as well as for the workforce at large, there is a real need for employers to reexamine how they hire, train and develop their employees," said Katherine Lavelle, of the global management consulting firm Accenture, which conducted the survey.

You mean like, I dunno, ACTUALLY TRAINING YOUR EMPLOYEES!? How about not insisting that we have 30 years experience in a skill that's only 5 years old? How about not requiring several years experience for an entrance farking level job!? How about firing your farking H.R. department, or physically READ resumes instead of making us play your version of buzzword bingo!? Oh, and here's one for the records, stop insisting we boil our entire life down into one page size 14 font double spaced!

/just sayin' here


Not to nitpick, but no employer wants to know about your life. They want to know what you can do for them and have those claims validated by pertinent background info.
 
2013-04-30 09:13:31 PM

Peki: Sergeant Grumbles: FTFA: Only 15 percent of this year's graduates think they will earn less than $25,000

That is the very HEIGHT of entitlement. Who do these parasites think they are?

Considering the line we ('06 grad here) got was that "the average college graduate makes $40,000 within a year of graduating"?

Dude, don't blame us for believing the lies you've been telling us since we were toddlers. We understand it's because you were told lies too, but it doesn't mean it's our fricking fault.


This.

I've been told here and elsewhere that I'm a dumbass, because at 17 I trusted my parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, teachers, guidance counselors, grown up friends, etc. I believed numerous adults who I thought had my best interests in mind, and now these people are calling me a fool and entitled for following their advice and trusting them.
 
2013-04-30 09:20:08 PM

rustypouch: I've been told here and elsewhere that I'm a dumbass, because at 17 I trusted my parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, teachers, guidance counselors, grown up friends, etc. I believed numerous adults who I thought had my best interests in mind, and now these people are calling me a fool and entitled for following their advice and trusting them.


Ditto.

We got lied to while the boomers gutted all the social programs that made the growth of the 50s-80s possible. The only reason I got my education without student loans is because I managed to nab my inheritance before my father spent it all (1m in 2003, now down to a 330K mortgage on a house; I got about 50K for my degree, and my bro probably won't get anything, but he's a vet, so he'll have access to services I won't). At least my mother has turned around (only took 2 years to convince her), and my MIL stopped sending me job postings (though that's mostly because she doesn't want the competition--we're qualified for the same jobs).
 
2013-04-30 09:20:14 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: FTFA: Only 15 percent of this year's graduates think they will earn less than $25,000

That is the very HEIGHT of entitlement. Who do these parasites think they are?


Damn, I got $25k doing first-line help desk with an engineering firm in KC straight out of college in '96. Declining purchasing power indeed.
 
2013-04-30 09:43:46 PM
$25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.
 
2013-04-30 09:47:24 PM

jayhawk88: Sergeant Grumbles: FTFA: Only 15 percent of this year's graduates think they will earn less than $25,000

That is the very HEIGHT of entitlement. Who do these parasites think they are?

Damn, I got $25k doing first-line help desk with an engineering firm in KC straight out of college in '96. Declining purchasing power indeed.


I think I got something like $35k as an still in school engineering intern back in 2000.
 
2013-04-30 09:49:45 PM

Peki: Sergeant Grumbles: FTFA: Only 15 percent of this year's graduates think they will earn less than $25,000

That is the very HEIGHT of entitlement. Who do these parasites think they are?

Considering the line we ('06 grad here) got was that "the average college graduate makes $40,000 within a year of graduating"?

Dude, don't blame us for believing the lies you've been telling us since we were toddlers. We understand it's because you were told lies too, but it doesn't mean it's our fricking fault.


I think that was sarcasm.  I've seen him in other threads and he's been consistently on the side of the prospectless graduate.

Your point stands, though.  I so love being told the reason wages have stagnated, jobs have been offshored and the upper levels are clogged with old farts who will die at their desks is because I don't work hard enough.

/that only seems to happen on Fark, though
 
2013-04-30 09:53:19 PM

trialpha: I think I got something like $35k as an still in school engineering intern back in 2000.


I think I got something like $92,000 as a fourth-grader who expressed a vague interest in petroleum engineering back in 2002.
 
2013-04-30 09:54:17 PM

Nuclear Monk: Not to nitpick, but no employer wants to know about your life. They want to know what you can do for them and have those claims validated by pertinent background info.


It's fair. I'm just frustrated that I work my resume endlessly, tailoring to each and every company I apply for and *never* get a phone call. I do get plenty of "while you're resume was blah blah blah... we have no openings at this time" or I hear from a company at the ultra-rare interview and get "we'll definitely be calling you," then after a month of not hearing from them after the follow-up thank you for taking the time call/email, I ring again only to get "oh I'm sorry, that position is filled. Good luck finding work."

I've gone to counselor after counselor too. None of them have pointed out any flaw, major or minor in it and still no phone calls. I feel like I need to get out there and obtain a Congressional Medal of Honor to work fast-food.
 
2013-04-30 09:54:56 PM

Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.


That works out to about $12/hr. That is pitiful for a college educated worker, even if the majority of college graduates didn't have loans.
 
2013-04-30 10:02:28 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.

That works out to about $12/hr. That is pitiful for a college educated worker, even if the majority of college graduates didn't have loans.


That's not pitiful considering the minimum wage is around $7-9/hr in the United States. Those with high school graduates deserve minimum wage. College graduates deserve $12/hr just as you said. They'll earn more as time goes on, but most need to start at the bottom unless they start a business.
 
2013-04-30 10:02:35 PM
At least in my field, there is a total and complete lack of legit entry level positions. My particular company is kind of sketchy because they simply don't hire entry level people out of school. Every single entry level person is a contract worker from a contract agency, so that (A) the company doesn't have to pay benefits and (B) at the end of the contract term, hire the person full-time and get a few more free years of entry-level wages. It creates a saturation of overqualified people at lower level positions, and so kids fresh out of school have no chance to compete.

More and more companies are using similar cheap tricks as an excuse to pay their employees less.
 
2013-04-30 10:09:55 PM

Funk Brothers: That's not pitiful considering the minimum wage is around $7-9/hr in the United States.


It is pitiful that a graduate is still so near the minimum range.
If college was free in the US, you might have a point. It's not, so the compensation to a graduate should at least cover the damn degree.

Start their own business? Where are the graduates making $12/hr and paying on loans going to get their capital? I don't suppose you think they should borrow it from their parents?
 
2013-04-30 10:09:57 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.

That works out to about $12/hr. That is pitiful for a college educated worker, even if the majority of college graduates didn't have loans.


It depends on the region.

$25K in the Bay Area is "Eat a bullet, except that you can't afford the bullet".  $50K is probably "I have a roommate and a car in the Greater Bay Area or a roommate and a bus pass in SF proper and I'm not eating ramen" without loans.  I'm at $72K ($49K after taxes), and I'm continuously broke month to month (though if I stopped paying off student loans and hadn't had my bike stolen, I'd have about a grand each month barring large expenditures).

$25K in the Midwest is a lot.  You won't be doing any cool vacations, but after child support and taxes (and pulling stuff out of his 401K), Dad was running around on about $18K/year with 2 part-time kids.  If I was starting out at $25K (and once again, didn't have a $4-500/month loan payment like a lot of these recent grads), I'd be somewhat content as long as I saw a decent career path to get up to the $50-60K where you can buy a nice home, some nice furniture, and have a vacation or two.
 
2013-04-30 10:11:13 PM

Bondith: Your point stands, though.  I so love being told the reason wages have stagnated, jobs have been offshored and the upper levels are clogged with old farts who will die at their desks is because I don't work hard enough.

/that only seems to happen on Fark, though


Lucky you. I get it from every baby boomer I encounter.

ajgeek: I do get plenty of "while you're resume was blah blah blah... we have no openings at this time, even though we just posted an opening this morning."


FTFY. (Relates to the rant of companies taking resumes even though a) they already know they are hiring Sally from Accounting's daughter or b) just going through the motions in order to meet whatever or get an H1B visa)

ajgeek: I've gone to counselor after counselor too. None of them have pointed out any flaw, major or minor in it and still no phone calls.


I had a job counselor show me the door. No kidding. I have a B.A. in English, better than average computer skills, and the job people at state agency looked at my resume, heard my story, and said, "Here's an application for food stamps. Good luck."
 
2013-04-30 10:13:44 PM

Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.


$25k for many professions is an awful starting salary for many. When I worked at an accounting firm, our new hires were earning $47k/year, and this was back in 1999. Engineers, nurses and those in certain technical fields earn significantly more than $40k right out of college.
 
2013-04-30 10:14:15 PM

meyerkev: $25K in the Midwest is a lot. You won't be doing any cool vacations, but after child support and taxes (and pulling stuff out of his 401K), Dad was running around on about $18K/year with 2 part-time kids. If I was starting out at $25K (and once again, didn't have a $4-500/month loan payment like a lot of these recent grads), I'd be somewhat content as long as I saw a decent career path to get up to the $50-60K where you can buy a nice home, some nice furniture, and have a vacation or two.


You shot your own argument in the foot their at the end. That's exactly the problem. Graduates DO have loans to pay off and there ISN'T a decent career path. And there are just so many great jobs hidden out there in the Midwest that all of us can afford to go chasing after...

Even you, with your charmed life, have to admit that it's just a big stinking pile of shiat for most recent grads.
 
2013-04-30 10:20:29 PM

ajgeek: Nuclear Monk: Not to nitpick, but no employer wants to know about your life. They want to know what you can do for them and have those claims validated by pertinent background info.

It's fair. I'm just frustrated that I work my resume endlessly, tailoring to each and every company I apply for and *never* get a phone call. I do get plenty of "while you're resume was blah blah blah... we have no openings at this time" or I hear from a company at the ultra-rare interview and get "we'll definitely be calling you," then after a month of not hearing from them after the follow-up thank you for taking the time call/email, I ring again only to get "oh I'm sorry, that position is filled. Good luck finding work."

I've gone to counselor after counselor too. None of them have pointed out any flaw, major or minor in it and still no phone calls. I feel like I need to get out there and obtain a Congressional Medal of Honor to work fast-food.




That is pretty frustrating. Have you tried cold-calling companies with a practiced 30 second spiel? I'm not going to pretend to be a pro at job hunting, but one of the books on the subject I read pointed out a pretty interesting facet that I was previously oblivious to.

The idea was that the order of preference for how a jobseeker likes to find a job is about 100% opposite of the order of preference an employee prefers to hire someone. The preference order was something like newspaper/website/employment agency/cold call/personal referral, with job seekers preferring to locate a job via the least amount of contact (e.g. Website).

Employers, on the other hand, really prefer to have a candidate basically fall out of the sky so they don't have to weed through a bunch of resumes.

Anyway, I found cold calling to be incredibly uncomfortable, but it landed me my current job, so there's perhaps a nugget of truth to it.
 
2013-04-30 10:21:46 PM
Feels good making ~45k in an entry level position without a college degree and no debt.

meyerkev: s.

It depends on the region.

$25K in the Bay Area is "Eat a bullet, except that you can't afford the bullet".  $50K is probably "I have a roommate and a car in the Greater Bay Area or a roommate and a bus pass in SF proper and I'm not eating ramen" without loans.  I'm at $72K ($49K after taxes), and I'm continuously broke month to month (though if I stopped paying off student loans and hadn't had my bike stolen, I'd have about a grand each month barring large expenditures).


I live on the fringe of the Bay Area(Rio Vista of all places) and live pretty comfortably off the money I make and I'm renting a 2BD house on my own. I guess it's kinda cheating, but my point still stands. I'm easily within driving distance of anywhere in the Bay Area too.
 
2013-04-30 10:23:01 PM

Sergeant Grumbles: AuralArgument: college graduates who were told throughout their young lives that if they goto school and work hard they

1. can expect to make more then that.
2. that earning that little makes you a worthless human being sucking on the government teat

Even without conditioning by society at large that college = money and success, I think that's there's a reasonable expectation that a job that requires a college degree have a salary high enough to actually pay for the degree.

In my job search early last year, I interviewed with a company and came to find out they were offering minimum wage for a CS degree. Happy to say I had a better offer elsewhere.


LMAO.....I am being compensated monthly a 6-figure/year salary for my internship as a SDE.  I would not have been kind to them upon seeing/hearing that offer.
 
2013-04-30 10:29:26 PM

Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.


You honestly have no idea what the market is like do you?

I started in my profession back in 2007, I started at $54K.  Not some engineering or accounting position either.   And that was about average for the field back then.


Hell I was making more than 25K a year working a help desk for an ISP and that was just something I did until my then girlfriend was ready to move for law school.
 
2013-04-30 10:30:45 PM

Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.


No, it's not a good salary, and if you ask for that little you are a moron.
 
2013-04-30 10:40:24 PM

lousyskater: Feels good making ~45k in an entry level position without a college degree and no debt.

meyerkev: s.

It depends on the region.

$25K in the Bay Area is "Eat a bullet, except that you can't afford the bullet".  $50K is probably "I have a roommate and a car in the Greater Bay Area or a roommate and a bus pass in SF proper and I'm not eating ramen" without loans.  I'm at $72K ($49K after taxes), and I'm continuously broke month to month (though if I stopped paying off student loans and hadn't had my bike stolen, I'd have about a grand each month barring large expenditures).

I live on the fringe of the Bay Area(Rio Vista of all places) and live pretty comfortably off the money I make and I'm renting a 2BD house on my own. I guess it's kinda cheating, but my point still stands. I'm easily within driving distance of anywhere in the Bay Area too.


Of course, Rio Vista to my job is an hour and a half in good traffic (and since most of that is 880, we're talking 2-3 hours each way.  I had a boss who did something similar for a little bit, and he mentioned getting up at 6 to arrive at 8 before traffic hit, and taking 3 hours when he couldn't leave early).  Running around in the Valley and South Bay (where my commute from Mountain View to Palo Alto is about a half hour by car or about an hour by train), a 1 BR will run $1600-$1800 even if you stay away from Palo Alto (which is one of the reasons why I make $49K a year after taxes. I'm supposed to be spending not quite half of it on rent).

/It's amazing the difference between "in-the-valley" housing and "hour-long commute away" housing.
 
2013-04-30 10:41:30 PM

Nuclear Monk: Not to nitpick, but no employer wants to know about your life. They want to know what you can do for them and have those claims validated by pertinent background inf


Sure they do.  Why else would HR google you, read your Facebook and Twitter, and not hire you when they find that picture of you drinkingr?
 
2013-04-30 10:46:23 PM

tortilla burger: At least in my field, there is a total and complete lack of legit entry level positions. My particular company is kind of sketchy because they simply don't hire entry level people out of school. Every single entry level person is a contract worker from a contract agency, so that (A) the company doesn't have to pay benefits and (B) at the end of the contract term, hire the person full-time and get a few more free years of entry-level wages. It creates a saturation of overqualified people at lower level positions, and so kids fresh out of school have no chance to compete.

More and more companies are using similar cheap tricks as an excuse to pay their employees less.


Sounds like my old office.

I was one of those contract workers.
 
2013-04-30 10:48:11 PM

Funk Brothers: Sergeant Grumbles: Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.

That works out to about $12/hr. That is pitiful for a college educated worker, even if the majority of college graduates didn't have loans.

That's not pitiful considering the minimum wage is around $7-9/hr in the United States. Those with high school graduates deserve minimum wage. College graduates deserve $12/hr just as you said. They'll earn more as time goes on, but most need to start at the bottom unless they start a business.


Oh, you!  Saying that people "deserve" low wages.
 
2013-04-30 10:51:42 PM

sendtodave: Nuclear Monk: Not to nitpick, but no employer wants to know about your life. They want to know what you can do for them and have those claims validated by pertinent background inf

Sure they do.  Why else would HR google you, read your Facebook and Twitter, and not hire you when they find that picture of you drinkingr?


Naw..that comes after they learn what you can do for them.  At that point, they're looking into what you might do TO them.
 
2013-04-30 10:56:46 PM

dlp211: Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.

No, it's not a good salary, and if you ask for that little you are a moron.


It's not a moronic offer, it's reasonable. Anyone who asks above $40,000 for an entry level job is being greedy and have a sense of entitlement.
 
2013-04-30 10:58:12 PM

Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.


In Moosedick, Wyoming, probably so. In anyplace that people might actually want to live, after taxes not so much.
/COL FTL
 
2013-04-30 11:03:11 PM

Funk Brothers: dlp211: Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.

No, it's not a good salary, and if you ask for that little you are a moron.

It's not a moronic offer, it's reasonable. Anyone who asks above $40,000 for an entry level job is being greedy and have a sense of entitlement.


Or we have a degree in something useful and can grammar good.
 
2013-04-30 11:11:05 PM
I was talking to a HR forecasting analyst for a DoD contractor who seems to think they can recruit the manufacturing talent from the automotive industry.

Knowing one of his companies most talented machinists, and knowing he's just about to retire, they're in for a surprise when they go to expect mass production engineers and machinists to produce parts in single digit quantities.
 
2013-04-30 11:12:26 PM

Peki: Bondith: Your point stands, though.  I so love being told the reason wages have stagnated, jobs have been offshored and the upper levels are clogged with old farts who will die at their desks is because I don't work hard enough.

/that only seems to happen on Fark, though

Lucky you. I get it from every baby boomer I encounter.

ajgeek: I do get plenty of "while you're resume was blah blah blah... we have no openings at this time, even though we just posted an opening this morning."

FTFY. (Relates to the rant of companies taking resumes even though a) they already know they are hiring Sally from Accounting's daughter or b) just going through the motions in order to meet whatever or get an H1B visa)

ajgeek: I've gone to counselor after counselor too. None of them have pointed out any flaw, major or minor in it and still no phone calls.

I had a job counselor show me the door. No kidding. I have a B.A. in English, better than average computer skills, and the job people at state agency looked at my resume, heard my story, and said, "Here's an application for food stamps. Good luck."


I've been trapped in grad school for years and haven't been actively looking.  My turn will come very shortly.

Dad's only advice is "Try !thisJob.  That's where the money is."  One was 911 dispatcher, which uses precisely none of my scientific training.  "It's not meant to be a career, just something to get some money in while you're looking! *beat*  Hey, I should be doing that."
 
2013-04-30 11:14:22 PM

Funk Brothers: dlp211: Funk Brothers: $25,000 a year for a college graduate for a full time job in an entry level position is a good salary to start out on. If my interviewer would ask me what should be me starting salary, I would say $25,000.

No, it's not a good salary, and if you ask for that little you are a moron.

It's not a moronic offer, it's reasonable. Anyone who asks above $40,000 for an entry level job is being greedy and have a sense of entitlement.


Hey, just because you were worth dicksquat when you started doesn't mean everyone is.
 
Displayed 50 of 106 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report