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(Yahoo)   Bagram crash recorded on dashcam--oh, my. A big airplane like that shouldn't just stop in mid-air   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 537
    More: Scary, Bagram, Bagram Airfield, public-benefit corporation, evidence  
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33876 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Apr 2013 at 9:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-01 11:44:57 AM

Charlie Freak: eggrolls: Charlie Freak: eggrolls: Precious Roy's Horse Dividers: Meisaims: Why did the dog sound so upset? That actually freaked me out more than anything.

Dogs don't like thunder, so I imagine a huge explosion and fire might be upsetting

Also explains why the "f*ck* doesn't come out until 1:15 into the crash. That driver was stone cold. I would have been shouting profanities from the boom.

Maybe people from other countries don't yell to themselves as much as Americans do?

I think giant airplanes falling from the sky and exploding elicit an almost universal response.

I dunno. Did you watch the Russian dashcam videos of the giant meteor exploding?


Vodak is a great sedative. Especially at breakfast.
 
2013-05-01 11:50:50 AM

Thunderboy: orbister: Spinning off the winch is a common form of death by glider.

I'm sure soaring is an amazing experience, but everything about the sport just screams "this is not something people should do" to me.


Yeah. Those things have the right amount of wings, but too few wheels and engines.
 
2013-05-01 11:50:54 AM

MythDragon: ZAZ: MythDragon: "The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa. "

Said somebody who never made a carrier landing.

You might appoach at a large angle, but the planes don't arrive at the carrier deck much steeper than a fighter on tarmac. You still generaly want two wheels on deck when you catch the 3 wire.

And actualy I've made plenty of carrier landings. I've made 38....simulated.

/Tried landing a B-2 on a carrier in Jane's ATF. Didn't work well.
//Tried launching a B-2 from a carrier as well. Discovered why they don't do that.
///Found you could take off with a F-117, if you backed all the way up so the rear wheels were right on the back edge, put on the brakes, ran the engines to full power, and kept the nose down at full flaps until you left the deck, and with some praying, and if the carrier is coming *out* of a swell, you'll make it.


Many years ago on MS Flight Sim I'd set up a helicopter takeoff from a helipad  on the top of a skyscraper and then change the aircraft to a 747 and try to take off.  Never quite managed it....
 
2013-05-01 11:53:46 AM

Peki: PunGent: Heh, I had an airline pilot put us down hard landing in Hawaii, and blow a tire...scary for a moment, but no big deal.  Funny thing is, he tried to deny it over the intercom...we're taxiing to the terminal, and it's JUST like a car with a flat...KaFLUMP, KaFLUMP, KaFlump...and he's all "uh,no, no, we didn't blow out a tire.  Everything's fine."There's a fine line between not terrifying your passengers and not feeding them obvious BS.

My flight CSS:

We're coming into Edmonton, pretty overcast with heavy clouds (the kind that hold a lot of rain). About halfway through what I would call "normal" descent, the flight attendants start doing mad dashes around the cabin. A few minutes later, we pitch 2-3 degrees down, and the engines throttle up. I look over at my fiancé, and say, "The pilot is trying to get this plane on the ground, and he wants it on the ground, right now."

A few minutes before actually landing, the pilot comes on: "Folks, landing may be a little bumpy. We've got weather coming in. Please sit tight and we'll be on the ground shortly."


I've flown on the Russian built copy of the DC10.... And lived.....
 
2013-05-01 11:54:05 AM

puffy999: thedumbone: Build a paper airplane. Check that it flies normally. Tape a bunch of coins to the nose/tail and throw it towards the ceiling.

Seriously, what a f*cking stupid analogy.



You prefer chicken wire???
 
2013-05-01 11:57:41 AM

BetterMetalSnake: Thunderboy: orbister: Spinning off the winch is a common form of death by glider.

I'm sure soaring is an amazing experience, but everything about the sport just screams "this is not something people should do" to me.

Yeah. Those things have the right amount of wings, but too few wheels and engines.


FTFY
 
2013-05-01 12:04:29 PM
For all those using coins and paper and aerodynamics theories you learned in high school to explain how this couldn't have possibly come from shifting cargo, it turns out - you're right!

step forward and claim your prize
 
2013-05-01 12:06:06 PM
Warning: This video contains an expletive !  Oh noes!
 
2013-05-01 12:10:28 PM

Tenatra: Lsherm: I need you to explain, in simple terms, why you think that plane took off ass down and nose up right off the runway

Pilot thought he could maneuver it in the same manner as an F-22 at take off. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16ti9GwnlVs


That may have been part of it, I was on a few military flights where the transport pilots were worried about unfriendly folk with RPGs and tried to do the good old vertical climb.  It is possible if the guy had taken off more more like this:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThoZNxy2JZk">http://www.youtube.com/wa tch?v=ThoZNxy2JZk, the poorly secured load might not have bitten him in the ass in such a way.  Of course it's all hindsight and the odds of some farker with a RPG tagging you versus a MRAP decided it wants to play at being air dropped armor.
 
2013-05-01 12:15:32 PM

WizardofToast: One of my greatest fears is riding a plane that just drops out of the sky mid-flight. Now I'm going to hate every take off unless all the fat people are kept in the center seats.

/I know fat people can't bring down a plane
//But ya never know


I've always wondered what happens is eveyone just got up from their seats at the same moment and rush to the back of the plane? Will it cause enough shift to put the plane in danger and cause a stall?
 
2013-05-01 12:19:40 PM

SuperNinjaToad: WizardofToast: One of my greatest fears is riding a plane that just drops out of the sky mid-flight. Now I'm going to hate every take off unless all the fat people are kept in the center seats.

/I know fat people can't bring down a plane
//But ya never know

I've always wondered what happens is eveyone just got up from their seats at the same moment and rush to the back of the plane? Will it cause enough shift to put the plane in danger and cause a stall?


The aisles are fairly narrow, odds are you couldn't get enough mass moving fast enough to really fark anything up.  I'm sure you could construct the problem theoretically, but it isn't much of a practical threat.
 
2013-05-01 12:26:21 PM

fatbear: For all those using coins and paper and aerodynamics theories you learned in high school to explain how this couldn't have possibly come from shifting cargo, it turns out - you're right!

step forward and claim your prize


The graphic in the video fails somewhat. The vehicles would have been loaded along the centerline and chained down, not secured with cargo netting along one side.

At least every MRAP I've seen transported by air were loaded in the way I described.  Like in this picture:

www.nycaviation.com

The ones I've seen in person have been on a C-5, not a 747, but this pic is from a 747.
 
2013-05-01 12:27:32 PM
ha-ha-guy: a plane
//But ya never know

I've always wondered what happens is eveyone just got up from their seats at the same moment and rush to the back of the plane? Will it cause enough shift to put the plane in danger and cause a stall?

The aisles are fairly narrow, odds are you couldn't get enough mass moving fast enough to really fark anything up.  I'm sure you could construct the problem theoretically, but it isn't much of a practical threat.


They don't have to move fast, they just have to move. And it's not really a "threat" if everyone's involved.
 
2013-05-01 12:32:50 PM

katerbug72: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2317306/Boeing-747-crash-vide o -American-killed-predicted-die-ball-flame-family-reveals.html?ICO=most _read_module

Daily Fail has some more info.


I'm surprised that National Air Cargo uses 747-400's - last I checked a lot of the contract lift/extraordinary rendition business was still on DC-10s (but I see Omni Air International has stored theirs and moved to Boeing twinjets) and 747-200s (Kalitta, I'm looking at you).  But a little digging, and sure enough.  A 744 is still a pretty big, pretty modern, pretty shiny, pretty pretty plane.  (Not quite a 747-8i, but still nice.)

Unfortunately I'm  not surprised to find that they've only been operating 747s for about a year and a half, operated mainly little bitty prop jobs before that, and seem a little indecisive about whether to be based in New York, Michigan, or Florida.
 
2013-05-01 12:35:14 PM

fatbear: ha-ha-guy: a plane
//But ya never know

I've always wondered what happens is eveyone just got up from their seats at the same moment and rush to the back of the plane? Will it cause enough shift to put the plane in danger and cause a stall?

The aisles are fairly narrow, odds are you couldn't get enough mass moving fast enough to really fark anything up.  I'm sure you could construct the problem theoretically, but it isn't much of a practical threat.

They don't have to move fast, they just have to move. And it's not really a "threat" if everyone's involved.


This. Even the Bruce Dickenson video says cabin crew have to be careful of passengers moving seats on half full planes.
 
2013-05-01 12:45:02 PM
Hey Subby, it does if you have airbrakes!
home.earthlink.net


/not obscure to older farkers.
 
2013-05-01 12:50:12 PM

buzzcut73: fatbear: For all those using coins and paper and aerodynamics theories you learned in high school to explain how this couldn't have possibly come from shifting cargo, it turns out - you're right!

step forward and claim your prize

The graphic in the video fails somewhat. The vehicles would have been loaded along the centerline and chained down, not secured with cargo netting along one side.

At least every MRAP I've seen transported by air were loaded in the way I described.  Like in this picture:

[www.nycaviation.com image 602x401]

The ones I've seen in person have been on a C-5, not a 747, but this pic is from a 747.


Guy I gamed with in college is/was a loadmaster for C-141s in the National Guard.  He used to take photos of every tie down before the plane was launched just to cover his ass.  Had some neat pictures.
 
2013-05-01 01:03:57 PM
After watching this video, I believe I will now ask my wife to stop calling me "Loadmaster".
 
2013-05-01 01:05:37 PM

buzzcut73: At least every MRAP I've seen transported by air were loaded in the way I described.  Like in this picture:

[www.nycaviation.com image 602x401]

The ones I've seen in person have been on a C-5, not a 747, but this pic is from a 747.


I assumed with those being as heavy as they are, that they would use more chains than straps to hold them in. Also, the lumber underneath is interesting. I suppose its to keep the vehicle from bouncing and keeps the tension on the straps. Very interesting pic.
 
2013-05-01 01:09:03 PM
This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.
 
2013-05-01 01:15:24 PM

Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.


Cell phone. I hear them on my car radio if my phone is sitting on the tray under the radio. You hear them ever few minutes as the phone has to fine the closest tower and tell the tower it's there.
 
2013-05-01 01:16:22 PM
Find not fine.
 
2013-05-01 01:18:03 PM

Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.


Or, if this was the conspiracy theory thread, it's the CIA bug planted in your car/radio/skull so the black helicopters can track you.
 
kth
2013-05-01 01:19:08 PM

jayhawk88: Seeing a plane do something like that when you're on the ground near it has got to be one of the most pants-crapping moments a person can have (aside from being on the plane I guess). Wichita has a couple of areas near Mid Continent and McConnell where landing planes can come in fairly low over roads, and anytime you're driving and feel that shadow pass it kind of gives you chills.


I used to swim at Rockwood (about Central and Rock behind the Dillons). Those big tankers were loud. You would simply stop your conversation, go under water, come back up and resume when they were done.

Voiceofreason01: Whiteman AFB is only about 10 miles south of I-70. If you're very lucky you'll get to see the B-2's doing training runs. Those bastards are scary to see come flying over, especially since you don't hear them until they're right on top of you.

I now live in the flightline here now, and I've seen them in both places. I am always surprised by how quiet they are, until I remind myself... um, STEALTH, dumbass.
 
2013-05-01 01:25:41 PM

thedumbone: Charlie Freak: thedumbone: Put me down as the (first?) to say - NOT a load shift.

The tailplane's natural state is to fly upside down - in normal flight it is actually producing lift that causes a tail-down moment. When the main wing stalls, the tail often stalls as well, either due to the same low speed or because it is in the buffeted slipstream from the wing. The loss of this tail-down moment causes, you guessed it, a nose-down moment. Lower altitude, less time, and the tail-first thing might have played out, but there are a lot of other dynamics at play here as the wings and horizontal stabs alternately tried to go flying again.

The tail is designed to stall after the wing.  A tail stall is a whole different beast and rarely happens outside of icing conditions.

In any event, a stalled tail is producing effectively zero lift.  A flying tail, with the elevator forward, is trying to push the nose down.  A stalled tail would be LESS likely to drop the nose than a flying one.

/CFII, AMEL ASEL, 2000 hrs


Actually, you've got that backwards. A stalled horizontal stabilizer will drop the nose (for more reasons than just a loss of lift), because the horizontal stabilizer is trying to push the nose up.  Hopefully you're teaching your students that CG is (generally) in front of CL, which tends to cause a nose down moment.  The horizontal stabilizer is there to produce lift in a downward direction....which when translated to the front of the plane (think see-saw) causes the nose to rise.  A tail stall, contrary to what pilots are taught for a wing stall, requires that the stick/yoke be pulled back, reducing AOA on the horizontal stabilizer.

/CFI
 
2013-05-01 01:35:17 PM

Flint Ironstag: Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.

Cell phone. I hear them on my car radio if my phone is sitting on the tray under the radio. You hear them ever few minutes as the phone has to fine the closest tower and tell the tower it's there.


So I just tried putting my cell phone near my RF-headphone transmitter and then calling the phone from my landline. Sure enough, I heard the buzzing sounds right before the phone rang. Interesting! Thanks.
 
2013-05-01 01:37:34 PM

scroufus: I am at BAF (Bagram).  I was in my office making sure my chair didnt move by sitting in it and I was in and out of doozing off.  Heard the BOOM thought nothing of it cause we have control dets all the time and usually they announce them but every now again they dont.  Any who our loggy came in and said a big ass plane just crashed.  We all went out side and seen the giant fire and GIANT smoke plume.   We stay kinda close to the flight line and they said we may have to evacuate if the smoke gets near us (it didnt).   It was really windy and cold that day.   About an hour after the crash it rained like a mofo.  Hail and everything for a good hour.    I only took one picture of the aftermath.   [sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net image 320x240]


bump
 
2013-05-01 01:40:54 PM

Skyrmion: Flint Ironstag: Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.

Cell phone. I hear them on my car radio if my phone is sitting on the tray under the radio. You hear them ever few minutes as the phone has to fine the closest tower and tell the tower it's there.

So I just tried putting my cell phone near my RF-headphone transmitter and then calling the phone from my landline. Sure enough, I heard the buzzing sounds right before the phone rang. Interesting! Thanks.


You fool! Now the black helicopters know exactly where you are!
 
2013-05-01 01:43:56 PM

Skyrmion: Flint Ironstag: Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.

Cell phone. I hear them on my car radio if my phone is sitting on the tray under the radio. You hear them ever few minutes as the phone has to fine the closest tower and tell the tower it's there.

So I just tried putting my cell phone near my RF-headphone transmitter and then calling the phone from my landline. Sure enough, I heard the buzzing sounds right before the phone rang. Interesting! Thanks.


Which is part of why pilots that I've spoken with aren't really crazy about the prospect of everybody on the plane keeping their cell on in flight. While the radio control unit is on the flight deck, the radio itself may be mounted underneath the floor or above your head in the the cabin. Nothing that would crash the plane, but imagine hearing that on your headset for a good portion of the flight.

At least, that's what they want me to think.
 
2013-05-01 02:14:14 PM

fatbear: BetterMetalSnake: Thunderboy: orbister: Spinning off the winch is a common form of death by glider.

I'm sure soaring is an amazing experience, but everything about the sport just screams "this is not something people should do" to me.

Yeah. Those things have the right amount of wings, but too few wheels and engines.

FTFY


I stand corrected. Throw some monster truck tires on that thing and we are in business!
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-05-01 02:26:05 PM
I've always wondered what happens is eveyone just got up from their seats at the same moment and rush to the back of the plane? Will it cause enough shift to put the plane in danger and cause a stall?

400 people at 80 kg are about 10% of the weight of a 747. If they move back 15 meters (on average) the CG moves back about 1.5 meters. The allowable CG range of a jet airliner is on the order of 2 meters, and odds are it was not at the front edge of the range to start. So all the girls going to the bathroom at once could be considered terrorists.

The plane may not crash outside of those limits, but the FAA will be very annoyed. Google found me a story of a 747 loaded outside of CG limits that didn't blow up: www.skybrary.aero/bookshelf/books/617.pdf.
 
2013-05-01 02:47:13 PM

Warthog: remus: SpikeStrip: remus: this isn't going to be pretty.

opposed to what?

I worked one where the pilot ejected and only got a few scratches on his arm from the sage brush while he was walking out to the nearest road.


Reminds me of a story I heard while visiting my brother down in Del Rio,Texas, where he was an instructor pilot at the time.  They had a jet in the unit out on a training mission, when the jet started to come apart and enter a rapid uncontrolled roll.  Instructor gave the instruction to eject, and they did safely (which apparently shocked the wingman, given their roll rate).

But then they landed.  In the middle of a herd of angry west Texas steer.  They ended up climbing what passed for a tree in that part of Texas -- a scrawny thing full of thorns -- and ended up sustaining greater injuries from the tree while evading the bovines than they did in the ejection.  Everyone in the unit thought this was hilariously funny.


Must have been a mesquite tree... those things are nasty.
 
2013-05-01 02:48:29 PM

neilbradley: To anyone who is a pilot (or know about such things), why didn't he put the nose down and power up? If you can see you're about to be in a stall situation, that's fairly easy to determine in VERY short order.


I believe the fark-appropriate answer here is "junk in the trunk."
 
2013-05-01 03:03:46 PM

SuperNinjaToad: WizardofToast: One of my greatest fears is riding a plane that just drops out of the sky mid-flight. Now I'm going to hate every take off unless all the fat people are kept in the center seats.

/I know fat people can't bring down a plane
//But ya never know

I've always wondered what happens is eveyone just got up from their seats at the same moment and rush to the back of the plane? Will it cause enough shift to put the plane in danger and cause a stall?


Small plane...quite possibly.  Big airliner...I dunno, any 4 engine guys on?

I'd imagine you'd have to be pretty close to the edge of the envelope to start with; airliners are commonly overloaded
by a couple of tons, but the key is, it's balanced inside the envelope.
 
2013-05-01 03:05:51 PM

Flint Ironstag: Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.

Cell phone. I hear them on my car radio if my phone is sitting on the tray under the radio. You hear them ever few minutes as the phone has to fine the closest tower and tell the tower it's there.


It's a phenomenon unique to GSM phones. CDMA and LTE (in most bands) won't cause the same interference. iDEN phones, on the other hand, drive electronics crazy. I had a junk iDEN phone that would cause my alarm clock on my nightstand to act as if it experienced a power surge and reset the time every time that phone talked to the tower.
 
2013-05-01 03:09:07 PM

MythDragon: ZAZ: MythDragon: "The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa. "

Said somebody who never made a carrier landing.

You might appoach at a large angle, but the planes don't arrive at the carrier deck much steeper than a fighter on tarmac. You still generaly want two wheels on deck when you catch the 3 wire.

And actualy I've made plenty of carrier landings. I've made 38....simulated.



Lieutenant Gorman?  Is that you?
 
2013-05-01 03:14:44 PM

PunGent: Plus, as a rule, you lose lift in a turn...too close to the ground for that. If he'd been at altitude, it MIGHT have worked, shifting cargo back to the CG.


There are times you find yourself in a situation in which there are no more remaining good alternatives.
 
2013-05-01 03:47:03 PM

PunGent: airliners are commonly overloaded by a couple of tons


Ummm...no.
 
2013-05-01 03:48:29 PM

ZAZ: I've always wondered what happens is eveyone just got up from their seats at the same moment and rush to the back of the plane? Will it cause enough shift to put the plane in danger and cause a stall?

400 people at 80 kg are about 10% of the weight of a 747. If they move back 15 meters (on average) the CG moves back about 1.5 meters. The allowable CG range of a jet airliner is on the order of 2 meters, and odds are it was not at the front edge of the range to start. So all the girls going to the bathroom at once could be considered terrorists.

The plane may not crash outside of those limits, but the FAA will be very annoyed. Google found me a story of a 747 loaded outside of CG limits that didn't blow up: www.skybrary.aero/bookshelf/books/617.pdf.


The FAA will be annoyed? Hell, *I'd* be annoyed as fark if I was on a flight with 400 women who weighed an average of 176 lbs each.
 
2013-05-01 03:53:55 PM

HighZoolander: I had to turn it off after the expletive at the 1:15 mark - that just pushed the video past an intensity level that I can handle. What happened after that?


The dog got under the clutch pedal when he decided to start driving again and cried.
 
2013-05-01 04:04:30 PM

buzzcut73: Skyrmion: Flint Ironstag: Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.

Cell phone. I hear them on my car radio if my phone is sitting on the tray under the radio. You hear them ever few minutes as the phone has to fine the closest tower and tell the tower it's there.

So I just tried putting my cell phone near my RF-headphone transmitter and then calling the phone from my landline. Sure enough, I heard the buzzing sounds right before the phone rang. Interesting! Thanks.

Which is part of why pilots that I've spoken with aren't really crazy about the prospect of everybody on the plane keeping their cell on in flight. While the radio control unit is on the flight deck, the radio itself may be mounted underneath the floor or above your head in the the cabin. Nothing that would crash the plane, but imagine hearing that on your headset for a good portion of the flight.

At least, that's what they want me to think.


See now, if the FAA would come out with an explanation like THAT, everyone would be all, "Yeah, okay, that makes sense," because everyone and her mother is annoyed by those damn pops that you hear from speakers and shiat. Not a omg we'll crash and everyone dies, but would cause enough of a distraction in the cockpit that makes the pilot's job a little more difficult. Add an emergency situation, and you don't want a bunch of cell phones going off while you're trying to communicate and do things.

/although, truth be told, we're at 30K' and I know we're dead? Fark you, lady, I'm at least calling my family to say goodbye.
 
2013-05-01 04:06:03 PM
I was helping a friend with his food stall at the 2011 Reno Air Races. We both saw things that day that we will never, ever forget. My father was in a commercial airline crash in 1977 in Denver. The point is, be it human error or mechanical error, planes are dangerous things. The old man went on to fly for work a few times a month for the next 30 years (he was, ironically, an aerospace consultant) and still flies a number of times a year. I still continue to fly both on commercial flights and with my private license. When the day comes that your number is called, your number is called, and there's not a whole hell of a lot you can do about it. Just my $0.02
 
2013-05-01 04:10:46 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUXgourLt6s

If they had this guy flying they might have been OK.

/not really
 
2013-05-01 04:16:47 PM

Popcorn Johnny: Charlie Freak: Wow, that's got to be a cargo shift.

Early word is that they were carrying 5 armored vehicles and something came loose.


Ever earlier word is, they crashed...
 
2013-05-01 04:20:12 PM
Weird how silent the person in the car is the moment it crashes.
 
2013-05-01 04:31:07 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Cuyose: I think the only plane capable of actually accelerating towing its own weight in a vertical climb, is the F-15

It can do that, so can the F-16, F-22 and F-35. Usually it's with 50% fuel and no load. MiG-29, Su-27, you get the idea. The best one was the Streak Eagle IMO.

Anyways, I wonder if you can fit RATOs on a 747? Flip a panic switch and maybe it could help.


Probably be a big mod to attach them.  Wouldn't the cargo come crashing through the cockpit during landing anyway?
 
2013-05-01 04:47:43 PM

Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.


Sounds like cell phone interference. Used to get it if my cell was too close to a speaker cable. It happens all the time, I think it's the cell phone saying "I'm here any calls?" because it does not happen only as a call comes in.
 
2013-05-01 05:26:41 PM

Peki: buzzcut73: Skyrmion: Flint Ironstag: Skyrmion: This is a bit off-topic, but can anyone explain to me what those static beeps are at 0:47 of the video? I've heard them in a lot of radio broadcasts, but I don't know what they are.

Cell phone. I hear them on my car radio if my phone is sitting on the tray under the radio. You hear them ever few minutes as the phone has to fine the closest tower and tell the tower it's there.

So I just tried putting my cell phone near my RF-headphone transmitter and then calling the phone from my landline. Sure enough, I heard the buzzing sounds right before the phone rang. Interesting! Thanks.

Which is part of why pilots that I've spoken with aren't really crazy about the prospect of everybody on the plane keeping their cell on in flight. While the radio control unit is on the flight deck, the radio itself may be mounted underneath the floor or above your head in the the cabin. Nothing that would crash the plane, but imagine hearing that on your headset for a good portion of the flight.

At least, that's what they want me to think.

See now, if the FAA would come out with an explanation like THAT, everyone would be all, "Yeah, okay, that makes sense," because everyone and her mother is annoyed by those damn pops that you hear from speakers and shiat. Not a omg we'll crash and everyone dies, but would cause enough of a distraction in the cockpit that makes the pilot's job a little more difficult. Add an emergency situation, and you don't want a bunch of cell phones going off while you're trying to communicate and do things.

/although, truth be told, we're at 30K' and I know we're dead? Fark you, lady, I'm at least calling my family to say goodbye.


I think its pretty hard on the cell tower networks too. When you are on the ground, your phone can only see and thus generate traffic to only a few cell towers. And your groundspeed is unlikely to exceed much over 120mph (high speed train) so handing off your call from one tower to the next is managable.

But add a few thousand feet of altitude over say, NYC, and your phone can now see many more towers, and at 500mph or so, hand offs from tower to tower are needed far more often. This can add a significant load to the network in routing your call, especially if every passenger on every plane was chatting away.

Now I heard that a few years ago, so I'm pretty certain that cell networks have become more robust since then, but the basic problem is the same.
 
2013-05-01 05:29:22 PM
Peki:
See now, if the FAA would come out with an explanation like THAT, everyone would be all, "Yeah, okay, that makes sense," because everyone and her mother is annoyed by those damn pops that you hear from speakers and shiat. Not a omg we'll crash and everyone dies, but would cause enough of a distraction in the cockpit that makes the pilot's job a little more difficult. Add an emergency situation, and you don't want a bunch of cell phones going off while you're trying to communicate and do things.

The ban came from the FCC, not the FAA, and where the hell did you hear the reason was "omg we'll crash and die?" from any person in a position of responsibility?
 
2013-05-01 06:05:46 PM
Oh my...Cargo shift huh? Never heard of that before...
I will be keeping an eye on the fatties walking about the aisle from now on. THEY SHALL NOT AGGLOMERATE UNDER MY WATCH!!
 
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