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(Yahoo)   Bagram crash recorded on dashcam--oh, my. A big airplane like that shouldn't just stop in mid-air   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 537
    More: Scary, Bagram, Bagram Airfield, public-benefit corporation, evidence  
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33877 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Apr 2013 at 9:26 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-05-01 08:30:57 AM
We could ban cargo-shifting. Then, only criminals could move boxes.

I'm kidding. Between this, and the guy that ran over a guy on a bike last night with his truck,(in front of the building I'm in) I've seen enough horrible for the day.

/only Wednesday?
 
2013-05-01 08:34:48 AM

thedumbone: Flint Ironstag: thedumbone: Put me down as the (first?) to say - NOT a load shift.

Once it stalled it was effectively free falling. In freefall you have zero g, so where the weight is suddely doesn't matter.

Physics doesn't work that way on things with air resistance.  They tend to fall heavy-part first.

Build a paper airplane.  Check that it flies normally.  Tape a bunch of coins to the nose/tail and throw it towards the ceiling.  Notice now it crashes.

Now, a paper airplane is more Newton that Bernoulli, but the difference is moot when you're stalled anyway.


"Bernoulli" what aircraft, anything, flies by Bernoulli?

Let me guess, you 'studied' aerodynamics in high school?
 
2013-05-01 08:35:47 AM
Short Answer:  Bungee cords aren't gonna keep your load of luxury cars from sliding to the tail if you climb too hard.   Cars don't stay put like LOCKED DOWN CARGO BINS, they WILL slide on the deck.
A tail full of BMW isn't gonna fly.

It takes about six hundred pounds of lock-down equipment per car if you buy the best gear.
 
2013-05-01 08:35:49 AM

Peki: Warthog: But then they landed.  In the middle of a herd of angry west Texas steer.  They ended up climbing what passed for a tree in that part of Texas -- a scrawny thing full of thorns -- and ended up sustaining greater injuries from the tree while evading the bovines than they did in the ejection.  Everyone in the unit thought this was hilariously funny.

I've always wondered about these stories. The line I was told was that ejection seats generally compress your spine so badly in the attempt to get you TFO of the way that walking afterwards is pretty much impossible.

The vid is just gnarly. Thanks for the Farkers who explained cargo shift, because my family has been in the aerospace business long enough that I know there's not much mechanical that can cause that.


What about that B-2 Spirit that crashed at Diego Garcia? That was mechanical, right? Flaps extended or something?
/too lazy to google...
 
2013-05-01 08:36:11 AM
Now, that's what I call a stall...
 
2013-05-01 08:40:56 AM

fatbear: Smallberries: Satanic_Hamster: saladan0: For those interested, here is the preliminary reports from aviation-safety

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20130429-0">http:/ /aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=20130429-0

It seems it was indeed a cargo shift that happened immediately after takeoff, and as those above me noticed, they didnt even get the gears up.

The question is if the loadmaster had the cargo improperly secured, or if it was a due to a malfunction of the tiedown equipment. Regardless the USAF is going to be reeling from this one for a while.

I've known a number of loadmasters.  They've all been heavily anal retentive sticklers to rules in every aspect of their lives.

If I had to bet I'd put my money on mechanical failure.

Except that the load master probably wasn't on the plane. There is a reason pilot's use checklists, their life is on the line, everyone else uses checklists cause the pilots life is on the line...

Loadmasters travel with the plane on non-scheduled cargo flights. Other articles confirm the loadmaster as among the deceased crew.

Do you really want some random asshat on the ground in east jiboo loading up your airplane for you?


No I do not want some random asshat on the ground loading my aircraft w/o his life on the line. Has it happened, you bet your bippy. There is a reason, after a major service/rebuild, there are two people in my aircraft, me and the mechanic. My only real hope that he didn't F'up, is that he (she in three cases) will die too. Does that make a double tragedy, probably, do I care, well no cause I'm dead too.
 
2013-05-01 08:41:50 AM
Smallberries: "Bernoulli" what aircraft, anything, flies by Bernoulli?

All of them?
 
2013-05-01 08:43:07 AM

andynz81: SpikeStrip: people_are_chumps: I'm flying for the first time in 12 years next week so I'm not getting a kick....

go rent 'fearless' 'hero' 'alive' 'flight' and 'flight 93'

no way you can crash after that.

Heh, the night before myself and a couple of others were to jump on a plane bound for the himalayas, we watched The Grey, without knowing anything about the movie prior. That caused a couple of nervous laughs...


F'n lame movie. Has photo's on the back of the DVD that weren't in the movie.

My guess, filled the Alpha versus Man fight, and found is sucked, so just cut the whole thing. But forgot to tell Marketing.
 
2013-05-01 08:43:30 AM
The airplane seen from another angle...

www.oocities.org
 
2013-05-01 08:44:18 AM

OHDUDENESS: Peki: Warthog: But then they landed.  In the middle of a herd of angry west Texas steer.  They ended up climbing what passed for a tree in that part of Texas -- a scrawny thing full of thorns -- and ended up sustaining greater injuries from the tree while evading the bovines than they did in the ejection.  Everyone in the unit thought this was hilariously funny.

I've always wondered about these stories. The line I was told was that ejection seats generally compress your spine so badly in the attempt to get you TFO of the way that walking afterwards is pretty much impossible.

The vid is just gnarly. Thanks for the Farkers who explained cargo shift, because my family has been in the aerospace business long enough that I know there's not much mechanical that can cause that.

What about that B-2 Spirit that crashed at Diego Garcia? That was mechanical, right? Flaps extended or something?
/too lazy to google...


Excess moisture in air data sensors from heavy rain overnight caused inaccurate information to be fed into the flight computer.
 
2013-05-01 08:53:17 AM

thedumbone:  A stalled tail would be LESS likely to drop the nose than a flying one.

/CFII, AMEL ASEL, 2000 hrs


You know how we all know you don't know what you're talking about?

/no, of course you don't.
 
2013-05-01 09:21:37 AM
StoPPeRmobile: They do not mess around with ejector seats.

Probably more concerned about a potential FOD hazard than it having to do with dangers of an unpinned seat.
 
2013-05-01 09:21:59 AM

Smallberries: Except that the load master probably wasn't on the plane.


If so, he's the unluckiest SOB on the planet, because the plane must have crashed on him as he was driving home.

Jamie Brokaw, pilot, Monroe, MI
Brad Hasler, pilot, Trenton, MI
Jeremy Lipka, pilot, Brooklyn, MI
Rinku Summan, pilot, Canton, MI
Michael Sheets, loadmaster, Ypsilanti, MI
Gary Stockdale, mechanic, Romulus, MI
Timothy Garrett, mechanic, Louisville, KY
 
2013-05-01 09:38:32 AM
There is an Airforce saying "It is inadvisable to run out of altitude, airspeed, and ideas at the same time."

Also "You can never break the world record for lowest flight. Only tie it."

"Every takeoff is optional. Every landing is mandatory. "

"The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa. "

"You start with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck."

"The three most useless things to a pilot are the altitude above you, runway behind you, and a tenth of a second ago.  "
 
2013-05-01 09:38:35 AM

thedumbone: Notice now it crashes.


Notice that the coins weigh several times what the plane weighs.
 
2013-05-01 09:43:20 AM
And this is why you have to turn off your iPhone before take off.
 
2013-05-01 09:50:23 AM
The dog took it hard.
"Whine whine"
(It's falling! It's crashing! It burst into flames! Oh, the humanity!)
 
2013-05-01 09:52:26 AM
MythDragon:  "The three most useless things to a pilot are the altitude above you, runway behind you, and a tenth of a second ago.  "

Maybe it's more appropriate to GA, but I always heard the third was "fuel on the ground."
 
2013-05-01 09:52:37 AM

Charlie Freak: youmightberight: HBK: WizardofToast: One of my greatest fears is riding a plane that just drops out of the sky mid-flight. Now I'm going to hate every take off unless all the fat people are kept in the center seats.

/I know fat people can't bring down a plane
//But ya never know

Here's a story for you, and something that maybe the pilot-folk here on fark can shed some light on.

I was sleeping on a Continental flight from Little Rock to Houston. I woke up and my stomach was in my chest, like when you're on one of those tower of terror or dungeon drop rides at an amusement park. The plane felt like it was just dropping out of the sky. Everyone started cursing and screaming.

It felt like we were falling for 30 seconds, but I'm sure it was probably less than 10 seconds. The plane leveled out.  Fifteen minutes the stewardess comes on the intercom and says "Sorry about the turbulence. We flew through some jetwash."

I muttered to myself "That's how Goose died." and the guy next asked me frantically "Who's Goose? is that a friend of yours?" He hadn't seen the movie.
 So fark pilot folks my question is this- I thought jet wash dissipates pretty rapidly. So how close were we to another jet for jetwash to cause what happened? And did the jetwash cause the engines to stall, or was a rapid descent done to avoid a stall?

Your pilot just dodged a plane by less than 100 yds.

This. Although wake turbulence (not exactly "jetwash") can severely disturb flight.


On a Delta flight coming in for a landing. About 50 feet from the ground, engines suddenly go full power (And I immediately think "Not good") and we pull into a steep climb. Lady next to me asks why we didn't land, and I say "The pilot is probably a fan of basic physics" She gives me a quizical look and I say "Two objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. We were probably about to land on another plane" Sure enough about 10 minutes later (the time it took to get a change of shorts, I imagine) the pilot tells us that the runway was 'in use' and we had to go around.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-05-01 09:55:46 AM
MythDragon: "The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa. "

Said somebody who never made a carrier landing.
 
2013-05-01 10:01:21 AM

ZAZ: MythDragon: "The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa. "

Said somebody who never made a carrier landing.


Oooohhh... I hated having to do those

/just a passenger
//a very, very nervous passenger
 
2013-05-01 10:01:30 AM

HBK: Charlie Freak: youmightberight: HBK: WizardofToast: One of my greatest fears is riding a plane that just drops out of the sky mid-flight. Now I'm going to hate every take off unless all the fat people are kept in the center seats.

/I know fat people can't bring down a plane
//But ya never know

Here's a story for you, and something that maybe the pilot-folk here on fark can shed some light on.

I was sleeping on a Continental flight from Little Rock to Houston. I woke up and my stomach was in my chest, like when you're on one of those tower of terror or dungeon drop rides at an amusement park. The plane felt like it was just dropping out of the sky. Everyone started cursing and screaming.

It felt like we were falling for 30 seconds, but I'm sure it was probably less than 10 seconds. The plane leveled out.  Fifteen minutes the stewardess comes on the intercom and says "Sorry about the turbulence. We flew through some jetwash."

I muttered to myself "That's how Goose died." and the guy next asked me frantically "Who's Goose? is that a friend of yours?" He hadn't seen the movie.
 So fark pilot folks my question is this- I thought jet wash dissipates pretty rapidly. So how close were we to another jet for jetwash to cause what happened? And did the jetwash cause the engines to stall, or was a rapid descent done to avoid a stall?

Your pilot just dodged a plane by less than 100 yds.

This. Although wake turbulence (not exactly "jetwash") can severely disturb flight.

Well that's terrifying. Doesn't GPS/radar, whatever give you a good heads up about nearby planes? Did the pilot just fall asleep or something?



Odds are either another plane was on the wrong FL, the other plane was going faster than expected on the right FL(went from max cruise to full power to catch up from a late departure or burn off fuel for an easier landing etc) and the air controler didn't notice or your plane did one of these,
 
2013-05-01 10:03:09 AM

ZAZ: MythDragon: "The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa. "

Said somebody who never made a carrier landing.


Probabilities, not certainties. It still holds true for carrier landings.
 
2013-05-01 10:04:25 AM

Smallberries: Lsherm: Charlie Freak: Wow, that's got to be a cargo shift.

Yeah, cargo planes don't go vertical after liftoff on purpose.

I take it you've never flown out of Afghanistan. I have flown some shiat, I have been riding through even more shiat, that flight has to be a top five sphincter pucker of all time.


I'm sure you have, but a steep climb is not the same as going vertical and tipping over.  A 747 needs to build up some speed before going vertical.  It's not a rocket.
 
2013-05-01 10:05:29 AM

fatbear: OHDUDENESS: Peki: Warthog: But then they landed.  In the middle of a herd of angry west Texas steer.  They ended up climbing what passed for a tree in that part of Texas -- a scrawny thing full of thorns -- and ended up sustaining greater injuries from the tree while evading the bovines than they did in the ejection.  Everyone in the unit thought this was hilariously funny.

I've always wondered about these stories. The line I was told was that ejection seats generally compress your spine so badly in the attempt to get you TFO of the way that walking afterwards is pretty much impossible.

The vid is just gnarly. Thanks for the Farkers who explained cargo shift, because my family has been in the aerospace business long enough that I know there's not much mechanical that can cause that.

What about that B-2 Spirit that crashed at Diego Garcia? That was mechanical, right? Flaps extended or something?
/too lazy to google...

Excess moisture in air data sensors from heavy rain overnight caused inaccurate information to be fed into the flight computer.



Wow... Seems like a really dumb reason to lose a billion dollar aircraft.
Thanks for that
 
2013-05-01 10:09:50 AM

Charlie Freak: This. Although wake turbulence (not exactly "jetwash") can severely disturb flight.


I remember being in LaGuardia waiting for a flight when I saw breaking news coverage of this - everyone around me was dreading another round of hijackings, but it was actually caused by wake turbulence + pilot error...
cheers
 
2013-05-01 10:17:00 AM

MythDragon: Glockenspiel Hero: A young kid had been sitting in the cockpit of an A6 and was fiddling with the knobs and levers. The crew chief hadn't properly secured the ejection seat. Kid didn't survive. Last airshow there for a very long time


I bet he was really excited for a few seconds.


I'm going to hell for laughing so hard at this.
 
2013-05-01 10:18:23 AM

Peki: The vid is just gnarly. Thanks for the Farkers who explained cargo shift, because my family has been in the aerospace business long enough that I know there's not much mechanical that can cause that.


You can do it in most aircraft if you pull back too hard during takeoff, or if the elevator control fails right (ie wrong). Spinning off the winch is a common form of death by glider.
 
2013-05-01 10:23:32 AM

Linux_Yes: Charlie Freak: Wow, that's got to be a cargo shift.

that or the engines crapped out. what are the odds that 4 engines would crap out at once. probably cargo shift.


I recall an old case where a B52 lost all 8 simultaneously...serious fuel screw-up.
 
2013-05-01 10:26:55 AM

wjllope: Charlie Freak: This. Although wake turbulence (not exactly "jetwash") can severely disturb flight.

I remember being in LaGuardia waiting for a flight when I saw breaking news coverage of this - everyone around me was dreading another round of hijackings, but it was actually caused by wake turbulence + pilot error...
cheers


That "pilot error" finding kind of stinks to me...you shouldn't be able to waggle the pedals enough on a modern airliner to snap off the vertical stabilizer on takeoff, unless you're taking off into a tornado...
 
2013-05-01 10:27:19 AM

orbister: Spinning off the winch is a common form of death by glider.


I'm sure soaring is an amazing experience, but everything about the sport just screams "this is not something people should do" to me.
 
2013-05-01 10:31:33 AM
Farking Christ, man.

They didn't have a chance.
 
2013-05-01 10:32:16 AM

MythDragon: Charlie Freak: youmightberight: HBK: WizardofToast: One of my greatest fears is riding a plane that just drops out of the sky mid-flight. Now I'm going to hate every take off unless all the fat people are kept in the center seats.

/I know fat people can't bring down a plane
//But ya never know

Here's a story for you, and something that maybe the pilot-folk here on fark can shed some light on.

I was sleeping on a Continental flight from Little Rock to Houston. I woke up and my stomach was in my chest, like when you're on one of those tower of terror or dungeon drop rides at an amusement park. The plane felt like it was just dropping out of the sky. Everyone started cursing and screaming.

It felt like we were falling for 30 seconds, but I'm sure it was probably less than 10 seconds. The plane leveled out.  Fifteen minutes the stewardess comes on the intercom and says "Sorry about the turbulence. We flew through some jetwash."

I muttered to myself "That's how Goose died." and the guy next asked me frantically "Who's Goose? is that a friend of yours?" He hadn't seen the movie.
 So fark pilot folks my question is this- I thought jet wash dissipates pretty rapidly. So how close were we to another jet for jetwash to cause what happened? And did the jetwash cause the engines to stall, or was a rapid descent done to avoid a stall?

Your pilot just dodged a plane by less than 100 yds.

This. Although wake turbulence (not exactly "jetwash") can severely disturb flight.

On a Delta flight coming in for a landing. About 50 feet from the ground, engines suddenly go full power (And I immediately think "Not good") and we pull into a steep climb. Lady next to me asks why we didn't land, and I say "The pilot is probably a fan of basic physics" She gives me a quizical look and I say "Two objects cannot occupy the same space at the same time. We were probably about to land on another plane" Sure enough about 10 minutes later (the time it took to get a change of shorts, I imagine) ...


Heh, I had an airline pilot put us down hard landing in Hawaii, and blow a tire...scary for a moment, but no big deal.  Funny thing is, he tried to deny it over the intercom...we're taxiing to the terminal, and it's JUST like a car with a flat...KaFLUMP, KaFLUMP, KaFlump...and he's all "uh,no, no, we didn't blow out a tire.  Everything's fine."

There's a fine line between not terrifying your passengers and not feeding them obvious BS.
 
2013-05-01 10:35:59 AM

HBK: I was sleeping on a Continental flight from Little Rock to Houston. I woke up and my stomach was in my chest, like when you're on one of those tower of terror or dungeon drop rides at an amusement park. The plane felt like it was just dropping out of the sky. Everyone started cursing and screaming.

It felt like we were falling for 30 seconds, but I'm sure it was probably less than 10 seconds. The plane leveled out. Fifteen minutes the stewardess comes on the intercom and says "Sorry about the turbulence. We flew through some jetwash."

I muttered to myself "That's how Goose died." and the guy next asked me frantically "Who's Goose? is that a friend of yours?" He hadn't seen the movie.
So fark pilot folks my question is this- I thought jet wash dissipates pretty rapidly. So how close were we to another jet for jetwash to cause what happened? And did the jetwash cause the engines to stall, or was a rapid descent done to avoid a stall?


Well, keep in mind, the pilot has to say SOMETHING.  And it has to be plausible and not scare the passengers.  What do you think is going to go over better?
"We had turbulence due to jetwash."
or
"The pilot jerks his arms when the stewardess accidentally bit down when giving the pilot a blow job."
 
2013-05-01 10:36:42 AM

ZAZ: MythDragon: "The probability of survival is inversely proportional to the angle of arrival. Large angle of arrival, small probability of survival and vice versa. "

Said somebody who never made a carrier landing.


You might appoach at a large angle, but the planes don't arrive at the carrier deck much steeper than a fighter on tarmac. You still generaly want two wheels on deck when you catch the 3 wire.

And actualy I've made plenty of carrier landings. I've made 38....simulated.

/Tried landing a B-2 on a carrier in Jane's ATF. Didn't work well.
//Tried launching a B-2 from a carrier as well. Discovered why they don't do that.
///Found you could take off with a F-117, if you backed all the way up so the rear wheels were right on the back edge, put on the brakes, ran the engines to full power, and kept the nose down at full flaps until you left the deck, and with some praying, and if the carrier is coming *out* of a swell, you'll make it.
 
2013-05-01 10:37:51 AM

PunGent: wjllope: Charlie Freak: This. Although wake turbulence (not exactly "jetwash") can severely disturb flight.

I remember being in LaGuardia waiting for a flight when I saw breaking news coverage of this - everyone around me was dreading another round of hijackings, but it was actually caused by wake turbulence + pilot error...
cheers

That "pilot error" finding kind of stinks to me...you shouldn't be able to waggle the pedals enough on a modern airliner to snap off the vertical stabilizer on takeoff, unless you're taking off into a tornado...


They used to teach that below a certain speed (its called maneuvering speed or Va, if you care), it was safe to move the controls from full deflection in one direction to full deflection in the other, without ripping the airplane apart. Because of that accident, the definition has changed a little bit, as you can probably imagine.
 
2013-05-01 10:41:49 AM
MythDragon:You might appoach at a large angle, but the planes don't arrive at the carrier deck much steeper than a fighter on tarmac. You still generaly want two wheels on deck when you catch the 3 wire.

And actualy I've made plenty of carrier landings. I've made 38....simulated.


You're confusing angle of attack and angle of descent (which in this case, is also angle of arrival, not a term normally used.)

The angle of attack is about the same for land vs carrier; the angle of descent at touchdown is very different.

Congrats on your 38 simulated carrier landings. You get a cookie.
 
2013-05-01 10:49:23 AM

iron_city_ap: They used to teach that below a certain speed (its called maneuvering speed or Va, if you care), it was safe to move the controls from full deflection in one direction to full deflection in the other, without ripping the airplane apart. Because of that accident, the definition has changed a little bit, as you can probably imagine.


Actually, that's a really important distinction. The certification said that you could move the controls to full deflection *in any direction.* Many, many pilots (including the people who wrote American's training manual) assumed that meant you could go from full stop to full stop quickly - it doesn't.
 
2013-05-01 10:56:35 AM

fatbear: iron_city_ap: They used to teach that below a certain speed (its called maneuvering speed or Va, if you care), it was safe to move the controls from full deflection in one direction to full deflection in the other, without ripping the airplane apart. Because of that accident, the definition has changed a little bit, as you can probably imagine.

Actually, that's a really important distinction. The certification said that you could move the controls to full deflection *in any direction.* Many, many pilots (including the people who wrote American's training manual) assumed that meant you could go from full stop to full stop quickly - it doesn't.


Its very clearly explained in there now.
 
2013-05-01 11:01:28 AM

fatbear: MythDragon:You might appoach at a large angle, but the planes don't arrive at the carrier deck much steeper than a fighter on tarmac. You still generaly want two wheels on deck when you catch the 3 wire.

And actualy I've made plenty of carrier landings. I've made 38....simulated.

You're confusing angle of attack and angle of descent (which in this case, is also angle of arrival, not a term normally used.)

The angle of attack is about the same for land vs carrier; the angle of descent at touchdown is very different.

Congrats on your 38 simulated carrier landings. You get a cookie.


Simulated cookie. :)
 
2013-05-01 11:02:59 AM

dbirchall: fatbear: MythDragon:You might appoach at a large angle, but the planes don't arrive at the carrier deck much steeper than a fighter on tarmac. You still generaly want two wheels on deck when you catch the 3 wire.

And actualy I've made plenty of carrier landings. I've made 38....simulated.

You're confusing angle of attack and angle of descent (which in this case, is also angle of arrival, not a term normally used.)

The angle of attack is about the same for land vs carrier; the angle of descent at touchdown is very different.

Congrats on your 38 simulated carrier landings. You get a cookie.

Simulated cookie. :)


Make sure you set your browser to accept cookies.
 
2013-05-01 11:05:30 AM

squibbits: But there's just no way an airplane crash can produce such a big explosion. Just ask any of the "Truthers".



And another thing..... no-one's ever seen that plane's birth certificate, right? How do we know it really is a 747 cargo plane and not a second Spruce Goose? Because, as everyone knows, metal doesn't burn (as shown in the video)..... it melts! But spruce burns!
 
2013-05-01 11:08:03 AM
 
2013-05-01 11:14:17 AM

fusillade762: jayhawk88: Seeing a plane do something like that when you're on the ground near it has got to be one of the most pants-crapping moments a person can have (aside from being on the plane I guess). Wichita has a couple of areas near Mid Continent and McConnell where landing planes can come in fairly low over roads, and anytime you're driving and feel that shadow pass it kind of gives you chills.

I have dreams of planes (and other large objects) falling out of the sky on a semi-regular basis.


me too
 
2013-05-01 11:15:35 AM

LonMead: CMcMahon: So... what do Alex Jones and the Conspiratards have on this one?

Well, you see that grassy knoll on the right? The guy behind the fence is who we should be looking for.



For your future reference, a plane has just hit a second grassy knoll.
 
2013-05-01 11:16:24 AM

PunGent: h, I had an airline pilot put us down hard landing in Hawaii, and blow a tire...scary for a moment, but no big deal. Funny thing is, he tried to deny it over the intercom...we're taxiing to the terminal, and it's JUST like a car with a flat...KaFLUMP, KaFLUMP, KaFlump...and he's all "uh,no, no, we didn't blow out a tire. Everything's fine."

There's a fine line between not terrifying your passengers and not feeding them obvious BS.


He's not the first to do that
 
2013-05-01 11:24:29 AM
I'm surprised no one has said "If it's Boeing, I ain't going".
 
2013-05-01 11:31:40 AM

Evil Twin Skippy: redsquid: Pfighting Polish: I_Am_Weasel: Precious Roy's Horse Dividers: I got crazy with my girlfriend one time while eating some ellipses. I was't being careful so it led to a pregnant pause.

This underscores why you must be careful.

Some people just don't understand the aste-risks.

You can't get a pregnant pause if you use the colon.

Or if she's on her period.



Anytime you see her on her period, ya gotta giver her some space before you start up again.
 
2013-05-01 11:37:23 AM
 
2013-05-01 11:43:27 AM

PunGent: Heh, I had an airline pilot put us down hard landing in Hawaii, and blow a tire...scary for a moment, but no big deal.  Funny thing is, he tried to deny it over the intercom...we're taxiing to the terminal, and it's JUST like a car with a flat...KaFLUMP, KaFLUMP, KaFlump...and he's all "uh,no, no, we didn't blow out a tire.  Everything's fine."There's a fine line between not terrifying your passengers and not feeding them obvious BS.


My flight CSS:

We're coming into Edmonton, pretty overcast with heavy clouds (the kind that hold a lot of rain). About halfway through what I would call "normal" descent, the flight attendants start doing mad dashes around the cabin. A few minutes later, we pitch 2-3 degrees down, and the engines throttle up. I look over at my fiancé, and say, "The pilot is trying to get this plane on the ground, and he wants it on the ground, right now."

A few minutes before actually landing, the pilot comes on: "Folks, landing may be a little bumpy. We've got weather coming in. Please sit tight and we'll be on the ground shortly."
 
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