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(Kotaku)   Stereoblind dude sees in 3D for the first time in his life- on the world's dustiest Nintendo 3ds   (kotaku.com) divider line 51
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3907 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Apr 2013 at 3:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-30 11:56:50 AM
maybe he should get a 3D printer now that he has the vision

and "print" out McDonald's french fries
 
2013-04-30 01:06:25 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: maybe he should get a 3D printer now that he has the vision

and "print" out McDonald's french fries


o_O
 
2013-04-30 03:45:56 PM
Subby, is it dusty because it has been sitting in the corner, unused for months?

/sounds like my Wii and PSP
 
2013-04-30 03:58:41 PM
All right, Internet. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to develop an app or program (maybe Google Glass?) that will render in real time the world through a 3DS screen, so this dude can appreciate the world.

/I would do it, but I have no skillz
//only problem: Grand Canyon. That thing looks like you're in front of a flat-screen IMAX anyway.
 
2013-04-30 04:02:42 PM
I kinda envy the guy.  I'd like to see in 3D at some point.

Unfortunately, my brain's never really had binocular input and can't process it when it gets it simulated; attempts at various 3D tricks just give me a burning headache after about 2 seconds of blurred vision, and then- strangely enough- my sense of hearing starts to cut out until I stop.
 
2013-04-30 04:04:43 PM

Peki: All right, Internet. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to develop an app or program (maybe Google Glass?) that will render in real time the world through a 3DS screen, so this dude can appreciate the world.

/I would do it, but I have no skillz
//only problem: Grand Canyon. That thing looks like you're in front of a flat-screen IMAX anyway.


The 3ds has a 3d camera. If he just turns on the camera app it'll basically do this for him
 
2013-04-30 04:07:17 PM

Wasteland: I kinda envy the guy.  I'd like to see in 3D at some point.

Unfortunately, my brain's never really had binocular input and can't process it when it gets it simulated; attempts at various 3D tricks just give me a burning headache after about 2 seconds of blurred vision, and then- strangely enough- my sense of hearing starts to cut out until I stop.


Maybe you need a third eye.


www.starburstmagazine.com
 
2013-04-30 04:08:21 PM
Is it time for a Dusty tag?
 
2013-04-30 04:19:27 PM

PsyLord: Subby, is it dusty because it has been sitting in the corner, unused for months?

/sounds like my Wii and PSP


The only reason my PSP got any use after the first six months or so was because I installed custom firmware.  Being able to take along the entire NES and SNES catalog is pretty nice.

Still disappointed in the Wii.  Outside of a handful of first-party titles, I barely use it.  The Wii U will be the first non-portable Nintendo console I don't buy at or near launch.
 
2013-04-30 04:19:44 PM
 
2013-04-30 04:22:50 PM
Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.
 
2013-04-30 04:43:26 PM
Stereoblind's first two albums were good, but after that, meh...
 
2013-04-30 05:01:06 PM

Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.


If you don't mind me asking... have you been this way all your life?  If not (meaning you can compare), what is it like?  I've always wondered since I had a professor that was stereoblind.
 
2013-04-30 05:02:27 PM

downstairs: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

If you don't mind me asking... have you been this way all your life?  If not (meaning you can compare), what is it like?  I've always wondered since I had a professor that was stereoblind.


BTW, I meant... is it different than what I experience merely covering up one eye?  Since you're seeing with two, but have to depth perception.
 
2013-04-30 05:03:51 PM

Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.


I kinda feel like this too. I've had monocular vision as well since I was around two years old. Basically, the author should be really glad that he's only  mostly stereoblind, whereas the rest of us can continue to not know what the rest of the world is seeing.

Does it suck? Yeah.
Can't really say what my reaction would be if I suddenly saw in 3D, though. I don't think I would have such an extreme one. I also don't think it's possible.
 
2013-04-30 05:07:52 PM

Leishu: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

I kinda feel like this too. I've had monocular vision as well since I was around two years old. Basically, the author should be really glad that he's only  mostly stereoblind, whereas the rest of us can continue to not know what the rest of the world is seeing.

Does it suck? Yeah.
Can't really say what my reaction would be if I suddenly saw in 3D, though. I don't think I would have such an extreme one. I also don't think it's possible.


Ever go to a 3D movie?  Does it look exactly like a normal movie?
 
2013-04-30 05:09:08 PM

downstairs: downstairs: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

If you don't mind me asking... have you been this way all your life?  If not (meaning you can compare), what is it like?  I've always wondered since I had a professor that was stereoblind.

BTW, I meant... is it different than what I experience merely covering up one eye?  Since you're seeing with two, but have to depth perception.


For me, at least, it's different because even when I am using one eye, the other... shall I say... nags at me? I know that it's there, and I sorta know what it is seeing, but I can't control it or get high detail from it without switching to it. It's almost like an entire eyeful of peripheral vision, I guess?

Sadly, my only memories of seeing in 3D are of me falling in the accident that lost me that vision, and it is far enough back that I don't remember what it was like, so I can't help you there.
 
2013-04-30 05:10:47 PM

downstairs: Leishu: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

I kinda feel like this too. I've had monocular vision as well since I was around two years old. Basically, the author should be really glad that he's only  mostly stereoblind, whereas the rest of us can continue to not know what the rest of the world is seeing.

Does it suck? Yeah.
Can't really say what my reaction would be if I suddenly saw in 3D, though. I don't think I would have such an extreme one. I also don't think it's possible.

Ever go to a 3D movie?  Does it look exactly like a normal movie?


It looks like pain. I get about ten seconds of looking at 3D images on screen before they dissolve into a splitting migraine.

What it looks like before that is two images very thinly layered over one another, depending on the type of 3D. Basically, the same as it does for you with the 3D glasses off, except, well, flatter.
 
2013-04-30 05:17:09 PM
Those stereogram pictures are a prank.
Nobody can really see anything in them.
 
2013-04-30 05:17:53 PM
IT'S STILL A GIMMICK TO ME!
 
2013-04-30 05:35:11 PM

Leishu: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

I kinda feel like this too. I've had monocular vision as well since I was around two years old. Basically, the author should be really glad that he's only  mostly stereoblind, whereas the rest of us can continue to not know what the rest of the world is seeing.

Does it suck? Yeah.
Can't really say what my reaction would be if I suddenly saw in 3D, though. I don't think I would have such an extreme one. I also don't think it's possible.


icdn3.digitaltrends.com
 
2013-04-30 05:42:36 PM
That was a frickin' awesome read.

\You never know how good you have it...
 
2013-04-30 05:47:46 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Leishu: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

I kinda feel like this too. I've had monocular vision as well since I was around two years old. Basically, the author should be really glad that he's only  mostly stereoblind, whereas the rest of us can continue to not know what the rest of the world is seeing.

Does it suck? Yeah.
Can't really say what my reaction would be if I suddenly saw in 3D, though. I don't think I would have such an extreme one. I also don't think it's possible.

[icdn3.digitaltrends.com image 800x861]


3D printer - Not really relevant to this. Still looks flat to those of us without depth perception, as does the rest of the world.
 
2013-04-30 05:48:47 PM

LZeitgeist: That was a frickin' awesome read.

\You never know how good you have it...


I'm lucky, I'm just space blind. I just see dry rocks, endless vacuum and deadly radiation in space. Other people tell me it's full of cake, bunnies and resources. Since I'm not ever going into space, it's not much of a handicap.
 
2013-04-30 05:50:21 PM

PsyLord: Subby, is it dusty because it has been sitting in the corner, unused for months?

/sounds like my Wii and PSP


You haven't been paying attention. 3DS is having a monster year.
 
2013-04-30 05:53:44 PM

Leishu: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

I kinda feel like this too. I've had monocular vision as well since I was around two years old. Basically, the author should be really glad that he's only  mostly stereoblind, whereas the rest of us can continue to not know what the rest of the world is seeing.

Does it suck? Yeah.
Can't really say what my reaction would be if I suddenly saw in 3D, though. I don't think I would have such an extreme one. I also don't think it's possible.


I am in much the same boat, except I had a silent migraine at one point that caused me to gain a perception of depth perception. It was a bit terrifying to be driving home and then realizing "Wow, that jeep is at the light, but it's really far away.. wait, what? It looks really, really far away, and everything looks weird. This isn't right." I went to the hospital the next day to make sure I hadn't had a stroke or something.

Having stereopsis would be really really neat, especially for the first, like, month. Then you'd probably get used to it like everybody else!
 
2013-04-30 06:07:40 PM

Leishu: 3D printer - Not really relevant to this. Still looks flat to those of us without depth perception, as does the rest of the world.


Sorry, I was just having fun, not making fun of you. Anyways, it must be more dangerous for you to go walk in the woods for example? I know when I walk around a familiar place and close one eye, it feels weird but I remember what is what, size and location-wise. When walking in the woods if I close one eye, I can't tell anymore if that branch is close or not. Know what I mean? Is it like that for you?
 
2013-04-30 06:19:24 PM

Peki: All right, Internet. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to develop an app or program (maybe Google Glass?) that will render in real time the world through a 3DS screen, so this dude can appreciate the world.

/I would do it, but I have no skillz
//only problem: Grand Canyon. That thing looks like you're in front of a flat-screen IMAX anyway.


Oculus Rift.
That is all.
 
2013-04-30 06:20:23 PM
I have some level of this too - I used to fail all those vision tests in school where you'd look into something and see an individual image in each eye that your brain would turn into a picture.

Catching a baseball was pretty hard without depth perception, and 3d movies don't do anything for me

/if I get drunk enough one eye drifts a little too...yay
 
2013-04-30 06:23:19 PM

Ego edo infantia cattus: Peki: All right, Internet. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to develop an app or program (maybe Google Glass?) that will render in real time the world through a 3DS screen, so this dude can appreciate the world.

/I would do it, but I have no skillz
//only problem: Grand Canyon. That thing looks like you're in front of a flat-screen IMAX anyway.

Oculus Rift.
That is all.


Pretty much what I thought of, and really not too hard to do.  Mount a camera on the front of it and have it feed into the display (which is something people want so they can easily look around the room while gaming).  The author of TFA mentioned in the comments he'd need to mod the Rift to shift the image a few centimeters off, but I believe you can already do that using the Vireo Perception drivers.

/have a Rift
//it's awesome
 
2013-04-30 06:30:15 PM
The best description I've ever managed for people is that it's kind of like living in a giant Viewmaster (for those old enough to remember them)- a bunch of 2D cell images endlessly overlaid on top of one another, until you hit the fuzzy, indistinct "horizon" layer.  That's sort of the baseline state of visual input.  The world's just a really well-drawn flat cartoon.

Judging distance is mostly a matter of relative size, clarity and motion, and shadows; it's much easier for close objects, but can be extremely difficult at longer distances or with an unfamiliar subject.  Moving objects are slightly easier, but don't expect me to catch something unless you throw it straight at my head.  (Glare is also extremely hard for me to compensate for, as it tends to utterly scramble most of the perspective cues.)
 
2013-04-30 07:06:00 PM
But clever readers have already noticed that my sight lines meet at just the right distance for holding a 3DS.

So why doesn't he see depth for real things at that distance?

In fact, since you have to cross your eyes to see stereoscopic pictures it seems like he should be able to see them easier than most.

Cross your eyes slightly until the two pictures split and make a third image of equal size in the middle.  Tilt your head if you have to to make the top and bottom edges parallel.  Focus on the middle picture.
techlosofy.it
 
2013-04-30 07:56:30 PM

Wasteland: I kinda envy the guy.  I'd like to see in 3D at some point.

Unfortunately, my brain's never really had binocular input and can't process it when it gets it simulated; attempts at various 3D tricks just give me a burning headache after about 2 seconds of blurred vision, and then- strangely enough- my sense of hearing starts to cut out until I stop.


Same with me. I was born with amblyopia and didn't have eye surgery until I was 2, so my brain never learned to put two images together, it simply shuts down any input from my right eye. All the surgery and therapy as a child did nothing to fix it, just made a cosmetic change so I'm not cross-eyed - except when I'm sick or really tired and then my right eye diverges from straight towards the inner corner of my eye.

In any case, I have no 3D vision naturally and never have, so I don't know what I'm missing. I wish that something like the DS 3D would work for me, but it won't because it's not because my right eye doesn't see, it's because my brain won't process an image it sends.

It's never affected my hearing though, which seems really bizarre to have happen.
 
2013-04-30 08:29:45 PM

silvervial: Wasteland: I kinda envy the guy.  I'd like to see in 3D at some point.

Unfortunately, my brain's never really had binocular input and can't process it when it gets it simulated; attempts at various 3D tricks just give me a burning headache after about 2 seconds of blurred vision, and then- strangely enough- my sense of hearing starts to cut out until I stop.

Same with me. I was born with amblyopia and didn't have eye surgery until I was 2, so my brain never learned to put two images together, it simply shuts down any input from my right eye. All the surgery and therapy as a child did nothing to fix it, just made a cosmetic change so I'm not cross-eyed - except when I'm sick or really tired and then my right eye diverges from straight towards the inner corner of my eye.

In any case, I have no 3D vision naturally and never have, so I don't know what I'm missing. I wish that something like the DS 3D would work for me, but it won't because it's not because my right eye doesn't see, it's because my brain won't process an image it sends.

It's never affected my hearing though, which seems really bizarre to have happen.


Same - Amblyopia - left eye dominant.  I can kind of de-focus my eyes and get a suggestion of what 3-D would be like but I get a headache pretty fast and it's certainly not worth what I CAN perceive.

Twenty years ago I took the Air Force pilot qualifying test - did REALLY well, they sent me to the nearest base for a physical almost as soon as the results came back.  Made it as far as the 3-D eye exam (stereoscopic images) and my dreams of being a pilot went *poof*  Guess I kind of knew it would happen but I think I was hoping I could somehow slide by.
 
2013-04-30 08:45:16 PM

Lumpmoose: I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".


That is, however, what it's called.
 
2013-04-30 08:47:25 PM
Interesting, although I still find face blindness a bit more intriguing.
 
2013-04-30 08:57:47 PM
Mine was a result of having mildly farsighted vision in my left eye, and very severe nearsightedness in the right.  Unfortunately, I had an early misdiagnosis; was very nearly taken in for eye surgery before the second-opinion examiner noticed that I was switching between the two depending on the test.  After that I learned to do it consciously; I actually have a physical sensation of a "switch" just behind the bridge of my nose, that I trip when I change eyes.

That's also where the odd synesthesia effects come in.  If I try to force-focus my vision, essentially set the switch to a middle position, my hearing quickly gets overwhelmed by a dull roaring, like listening to a seashell.  More than a few seconds and the headache kicks in; and if I hold it long enough, my sense of balance breaks down and I topple over.

My best wild-assed guess is that, since this has been the way of things since I was born, my early brain development decided not to let that excess visual wetware go to waste, and rededicated it.  (No clue to what extent that's actually possible, but it's the closest thing to a reasonable explanation I have.)
 
2013-04-30 09:00:05 PM
i2.listal.com
 
2013-04-30 09:15:53 PM

downstairs: downstairs: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

If you don't mind me asking... have you been this way all your life?  If not (meaning you can compare), what is it like?  I've always wondered since I had a professor that was stereoblind.

BTW, I meant... is it different than what I experience merely covering up one eye?  Since you're seeing with two, but have to depth perception.


My eyes started crossing, so I had surgery when I was 14.  Then my eyes started strabismusing so I had surgery when I was 28.  It's not quite like covering up one eye.  I get data from both eyes.  If I close my left eye, it looks like a normal oval-shaped perspective from my right eye.  If I then open my left eye, the visual data that was missing just adds on, like the left crescent shape slapping onto the side of a Venn diagram.  And vice versa.  It gives me the ability to consciously shift between which eye is my "primary eye" with both eyes open.  "Left eye--right eye--left eye--right eye" says my brain while the whole world shifts slightly back and forth as I view it from a couple of inches to the side and back.  It was easier to do before my strabismus surgery.  Other than that, both eyes are 20-15 and it doesn't diminish my peripheral vision at all.

The lack of depth perception is the biggest hurdle.  But by looking at the sizes and spaces of things and knowing how big they are normally, it's easy enough to compensate.  Ball sports are pretty much a waste of time.  I remember baseball getting progressively harder through my youth so maybe it degraded over time.  But I don't perceive everything as "flat" or something.  I can still move my head from side to side and the perspective changes aren't stupefying or anything.
 
2013-04-30 09:22:05 PM

Leishu: downstairs: Leishu: Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.

I kinda feel like this too. I've had monocular vision as well since I was around two years old. Basically, the author should be really glad that he's only  mostly stereoblind, whereas the rest of us can continue to not know what the rest of the world is seeing.

Does it suck? Yeah.
Can't really say what my reaction would be if I suddenly saw in 3D, though. I don't think I would have such an extreme one. I also don't think it's possible.

Ever go to a 3D movie?  Does it look exactly like a normal movie?

It looks like pain. I get about ten seconds of looking at 3D images on screen before they dissolve into a splitting migraine.

What it looks like before that is two images very thinly layered over one another, depending on the type of 3D. Basically, the same as it does for you with the 3D glasses off, except, well, flatter.


For me, the glasses make it look like a normal movie, but a little blurrier.  I don't know if that's the normal crappier visual quality of 3D movies or not, but it's obviously a waste of money for me.  I can usually tell when they're doing 3D effects because the object becomes ridiculously large onscreen.  But it doesn't pop out.
 
2013-04-30 09:23:29 PM

Wasteland: I kinda envy the guy.  I'd like to see in 3D at some point.

Unfortunately, my brain's never really had binocular input and can't process it when it gets it simulated; attempts at various 3D tricks just give me a burning headache after about 2 seconds of blurred vision, and then- strangely enough- my sense of hearing starts to cut out until I stop.


Me too, Except I dont have the hearing problem... I was cross eyed as a child and they didn't repair it till I was 5, and after that I had problems with ambliopia, so I can't see 3d either. I usually don't even use one eye unless I concentrate on it.

It makes me happy that I am not alone in this problem...
 
2013-04-30 10:13:38 PM
Yet another stereoblind person here.  Ever since the surgery to fix my crossed eyes at 6 months, I have had no depth perception.

Going down the list:
Yes-  Lumpmoose: It's not quite like covering up one eye.  I get data from both eyes.  If I close my left eye, it looks like a normal oval-shaped perspective from my right eye.  If I then open my left eye, the visual data that was missing just adds on, like the left crescent shape slapping onto the side of a Venn diagram.  And vice versa.
Sorta.  My left is near-sighted and right is far, so it only rarely works -  Lumpmoose: It gives me the ability to consciously shift between which eye is my "primary eye" with both eyes open.  "Left eye--right eye--left eye--right eye" says my brain while the whole world shifts slightly back and forth as I view it from a couple of inches to the side and back.
Yes.  Everything looks normal (with the exception of a couple odd forced perspective tricks (Parsing Tree Branches from a distance is a pain)).  It's just not 3D -  Lumpmoose: But by looking at the sizes and spaces of things and knowing how big they are normally, it's easy enough to compensate.
Very much yes, because all the tricks stop working -  Lumpmoose: Ball sports are pretty much a waste of time.

Re 3D Movies: They don't work (except for very, very occasional periods (like maybe once a movie for 2 seconds) where stuff is 3D inside the screen).  I get a moderate headache, but other than that everything looks normal.

If I had to guess, I'd say that it's like always looking at a picture of something.  A really good, infinite resolution picture, but still a picture.  Grand Canyon was cool.  The tower at the east end of the South Side was really cool because you could go up and see the perfectly flat ground with this massive gash in it which really helped where scale was concerned.

/Surgery at 6 months (to fix crossed eyes), 6 years (to let me not have glasses through first grade), and 16 (to move my left eye so that it would match the right)
//Honestly surprised there are so many people.
 
2013-04-30 11:10:10 PM
www.5feet20.com
 
2013-04-30 11:38:12 PM

Peki: All right, Internet. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to develop an app or program (maybe Google Glass?) that will render in real time the world through a 3DS screen, so this dude can appreciate the world.

/I would do it, but I have no skillz
//only problem: Grand Canyon. That thing looks like you're in front of a flat-screen IMAX anyway.


he can use the 3D camera but it is not prefect
 
2013-05-01 12:24:20 AM
I find that I have to use the distance between the headlights of oncoming vehicles to determine how far away they are.

I hate Jeeps.

Parking garages and parallel parking is never fun. Can't really tell how close I am to the other cars. When my wife is parking in a close spot, I just close my eyes.

Colorblind, nearsighted, poor depth perception, poor night vision, dyslexic, bad shoulders and knees, and the United States Air Force STILL took me!
 
2013-05-01 12:34:46 AM
timswar:

The 3ds has a 3d camera. If he just turns on the camera app it'll basically do this for him

The author actually responded in the comments at the linked page and mentioned the 3DS camera.  It works for him but is fairly low quality.
 
2013-05-01 12:38:39 AM

Peki: is to develop an app or program (maybe Google Glass?) that will render in real time the world through a 3DS screen, so this dude can appreciate the world.


Why?

I have perfect stereo vision. I often have to close one eye anyway for some reason, like gnat attacks and sand. I don't lose anything at those times unless I'm trying to do something like hit a speeding rabbit with a bow.
 
2013-05-01 12:58:43 AM

Lumpmoose: Seems a bit over-dramatic for me.  I can only see out of one eye at a time, but I've never called it some type of "blindness".  Merely, "I have no depth perception."  I don't "despair" about the mountains not having volume.  Shadows, size and other tricks tell you most of what you need to know anyway.  I can even parallel park now.


I still remember the first time I noticed mountains had any dimension (besides height).  I was 16 years old.  I was driving leisurely on some mountain roads when, BOOM!, the mountains in the background suddenly when from being a flat backdrop to have depth and dimension.

The funny thing is, I'd driven through those mountains a gazillion times before, but they had never looked three-dimensional to me until that day.
 
2013-05-01 04:05:48 AM
Stereo blind here too. I have always wondered what I'm missing.  I read a story about some guy who set up two webcams several hundred feet apart aimed at the same clouds in the sky and piped the output of each one to separate eyes via goggles.  He said he felt like a god walking among mountains.
 
2013-05-01 07:03:20 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Leishu: 3D printer - Not really relevant to this. Still looks flat to those of us without depth perception, as does the rest of the world.

Sorry, I was just having fun, not making fun of you. Anyways, it must be more dangerous for you to go walk in the woods for example? I know when I walk around a familiar place and close one eye, it feels weird but I remember what is what, size and location-wise. When walking in the woods if I close one eye, I can't tell anymore if that branch is close or not. Know what I mean? Is it like that for you?


No offense taken at all. Sorry if I seemed to take it a bit personally. Such is not the case. That being said, it is.. I guess you would call it an intense issue for me.

No lie, I envy those who see things in depth. I'd love to, just for once, know what it's like not to be able to tell the difference between a high-enough TV screen and the rest of the world.

Yet another stereoblind person here.  Ever since the surgery to fix my crossed eyes at 6 months, I have had no depth perception.

I'm sure you know how lucky you are.

I had my fifth, and final surgery in as of around sixteen years ago. After an injury that shattered the right side of my face (before the first surgery), followed by the mentioned surgeries, there is simply nothing left to operate on, and I will never see what others see.
 
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