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(IT World)   New study finds older programmers know more than younger ones, and also take more naps   (itworld.com) divider line 163
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1936 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Apr 2013 at 3:36 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-30 11:28:28 AM
i don't think they eat enough CHEESE WHIZ.  they should have a philly steak meal kit at every workstation!
 
2013-04-30 11:46:42 AM
It's a youth-centric field, but experience is always trumps age.  Most of the time, the problems that I have dealt with share as much with the business requirements and how the organization operates on a day-to-day basis as they do with limitations of the technical layers.  A newbie fresh out of college is not going to be familiar  with "the way things are done around here" (hint:  it's never the correct way), and they are usually going to burn goodwill by trying to reinvent a process that doesn't need it.

I can't tell you how many times that a simple spreadsheet dump ended up solving problems that a custom reporting solution could never do.  Yet when I first got here, I couldn't believe that a business could actually run on something so archaic.

Ten years later, I think I've finally found out who actually wants the information and who just wants me to think that they do.

The people who care about the information don't care that it may not fit on an 8 1/2" x 11" sheet of paper.
 
2013-04-30 01:44:05 PM
Speaking as a young programmer,
www.librarified.net
 
2013-04-30 01:45:43 PM
Some old programmers know Kobold

i678.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-30 02:10:45 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: Some old programmers know Kobold

[i678.photobucket.com image 298x320]


I do.  He was one of my customers.
 
2013-04-30 02:32:00 PM
Depends on exactly what you're looking for.  Where I work, for example, well to say that we have legacy code is an understatement.  We currently have an AS/400 emulating a System/36 running custom software, parts of which were written 3 companies ago.  You won't find a kid out of college that knows ANYTHING about that.
 
2013-04-30 03:06:54 PM
It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).

Right after graduating college, I could white-board a recursive loader for a b-tree upon being asked.  Now, not so much.  But you want me to code an automated interface that picks up data from 10 different XML files where all the elements are strings (even the dates) and place this information in an Oracle 11g database after transforming appropriately including decrypting PII data and have it run on a user settable schedule and have it log success and failures and e-mail failure summaries and have it done quickly and correctly with the ability to deal with inevitable specification changes...No problem.
 
2013-04-30 03:11:39 PM

UberDave: It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).

Right after graduating college, I could white-board a recursive loader for a b-tree upon being asked.  Now, not so much.  But you want me to code an automated interface that picks up data from 10 different XML files where all the elements are strings (even the dates) and place this information in an Oracle 11g database after transforming appropriately including decrypting PII data and have it run on a user settable schedule and have it log success and failures and e-mail failure summaries and have it done quickly and correctly with the ability to deal with inevitable specification changes...No problem.


Um...yeah...well...I can model to 5th Normal Form!!!
 
2013-04-30 03:38:34 PM
It's a youth-centric field because employers want to pay less and get more.

This study is in the "no ****, sherlock" realm.
 
2013-04-30 03:43:54 PM
And the tragedy is that they have the largest tusks, so they are often specifically targeted by poachers.
 
2013-04-30 03:56:17 PM
People with more experience have more experience, you say?  Well I never!
 
2013-04-30 04:18:05 PM
I think it really comes down to this.

Young Developer:  "The user can just download it from here, save it as an XML and import the xml into Excel and sort on column X which means I can avoid all the office interop nonsense and code it with (php/ruby/open source buzzword of the week)"

Me: "The use just wants to open a spreadsheet that has their data in a form the know."

Young Developer:  "That's stupid, this is cross platform, Micro$oft is teh evel, the user is dumb and lazy"

Me:  "The user is a mid-level employee functioning as an office manager, she's got 1 phone ringing with call on hold, 35-40 emails to respond to and she's wondering if she can get off work by 5, pick up the kids from daycare, get home and make dinner, all while her boss is bellowing about when she's going to get him the report that you want her to jump through hoops to get."

Young Developer:  "This is dumb.  This is not what development is about"

Me:  "Listen you little ass hat, this is EXACTLY what development is about.  Occasionally we get to redefine a process to totally revolutionize the business.  But the other 99% of the time it's about making someones life a little easier while making the results a lot more repeatable while making sure our part in it is sustainable which means I expect better code from you and some damn documentation."

//I actually love working with young developers, the energy and enthusiasm is great, you just have to sit on them from time to time.
 
2013-04-30 04:22:03 PM

UberDave: It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).


Well, according to TFA, many are. So, that's good.

I'm curious what the next paradigm shift will be. I've seen older programmers who understand a lot of concepts, but just never got a handle on object-oriented programming, or loosely-typed interpreted languages. I wonder if that will happen to me. I not afraid of learning a new language or a new technology. I'm afraid that there will come a completely new concept that I just can't get my head around, or I never get around to it because I spend all my time building what I know.
 
2013-04-30 04:23:02 PM

fst_creeper: I think it really comes down to this.

Young Developer:  "The user can just download it from here, save it as an XML and import the xml into Excel and sort on column X which means I can avoid all the office interop nonsense and code it with (php/ruby/open source buzzword of the week)"

Me: "The use just wants to open a spreadsheet that has their data in a form the know."

Young Developer:  "That's stupid, this is cross platform, Micro$oft is teh evel, the user is dumb and lazy"

Me:  "The user is a mid-level employee functioning as an office manager, she's got 1 phone ringing with call on hold, 35-40 emails to respond to and she's wondering if she can get off work by 5, pick up the kids from daycare, get home and make dinner, all while her boss is bellowing about when she's going to get him the report that you want her to jump through hoops to get."

Young Developer:  "This is dumb.  This is not what development is about"

Me:  "Listen you little ass hat, this is EXACTLY what development is about.  Occasionally we get to redefine a process to totally revolutionize the business.  But the other 99% of the time it's about making someones life a little easier while making the results a lot more repeatable while making sure our part in it is sustainable which means I expect better code from you and some damn documentation."

//I actually love working with young developers, the energy and enthusiasm is great, you just have to sit on them from time to time.


The most successful a developer can be is if they manage to find out what the most tedious parts of their users' jobs are, and automate those.  And any young dev actively endorsing PHP should be shot before they start polluting the industry.  If you want awesome young language power, it's all in the python.
 
2013-04-30 04:25:26 PM

fst_creeper: //I actually love working with young developers, the energy and enthusiasm is great, you just have to sit on them from time to time.


Just watch out for HR.

/giggity
 
2013-04-30 04:37:32 PM
I was going to go home and take a nap... I'm old :(

Last week I was helping an intern with a final...  She didn't know anything about the back end of the code..  just drag and drop! also she was a she!

/Times are changing
//For the better!
///Lord knows we need more eye candy in this sausage farm.
 
2013-04-30 04:42:05 PM

GiantRex: Speaking as a young programmer,
[www.librarified.net image 250x250]


This.  I almost wish I was in a big shop where my WTF's (because I have no clue how it's supposed to be done and my WTF's do work despite being total WTF's) would get caught by some old dude, they'd whack me upside the head and show me what X is supposed to be for, and what the proper way of doing Y and Z in the language is.

ikanreed: If you want awesome young language power, it's all in the python.


Or the Ruby.  Man, do I love the Ruby.  Pity I'm the only one at my company who uses it on a day to day basis (We're using Chef-solo to automate a lot of setup for our C++/Python app).

/Python and Ruby with a very tiny little bit of bash, and for some reason JS.
 
2013-04-30 04:47:04 PM

ikanreed: And any young dev actively endorsing PHP should be shot before they start polluting the industry.  If you want awesome young language power, it's all in the python.


While I'd rather see Python over PHP, I was in fact trying to imply that we're talking about a Microsoft shop and Studio is the tool of choice.  That was not my decision but for the environment it it is probably the right one.

jonny_q: or loosely-typed interpreted languages

Sometimes it is not that we don't have a handle on it but we've seen the other side of the coin.  Loosely typed languages in particular can be a boon to the developer but a real pain for long term data integrity, especially coupled with a young developer willing to take shortcuts because they fail to see long term shortcomings of their methods.  I can always tell a database that was fed by a loosely typed database pretty much at a glance.  Migrating them is always a hoot.

pizen: Just watch out for HR.


Sadly it is more likely to be the ER if I were to literally sit on them...
 
2013-04-30 04:47:10 PM

UberDave: It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).

Right after graduating college, I could white-board a recursive loader for a b-tree upon being asked.  Now, not so much.  But you want me to code an automated interface that picks up data from 10 different XML files where all the elements are strings (even the dates) and place this information in an Oracle 11g database after transforming appropriately including decrypting PII data and have it run on a user settable schedule and have it log success and failures and e-mail failure summaries and have it done quickly and correctly with the ability to deal with inevitable specification changes...No problem.


Doing all of that (well, Oracle 10g, but I also had to deal with SFTP automation and HIPAA) for health insurance was my first job out of college ten years ago.

Bonus: I don't have a comp sci degree.

/these days I program in C#, which mostly means checking Facebook and catching up on XKCD
 
2013-04-30 04:47:52 PM

fst_creeper: I think it really comes down to this.


I'm going to be a pedant about your example. There are three rules in life.
1) Wash your hands after wiping your ass
2) Never use Office Interop
3)  Never farking use Office Interop,seriously, what the hell is wrong with you?

You will simply make you, your management, and your users sad, as it will inevitably involve more work to deploy and maintain. Five years from now, when you've moved on to something else in the company, nobody from your team is going to want to support that POS, and then it's going to get shoved over to corporate IT, and corporate IT is going to refuse to support it without rewriting it in a technology that's maintainable.

There are  actual ways to interface with Office file formats that are not factories of pain and suffering, and these methods are not  new. They are not the buzzword of the week. But they are the correct way to do these things. You can easily make it cross platform by using a format like CSV, which is both easy to manipulate  and opens in Excel, and if you want to use a buzzword, you can use WCF's data services to make an OData feed that can open in any copy of Excel which has PowerPivot installed (pretty much any corporate environment that uses SharePoint).

//EF5->WCF RIA->Excel w/ PowerPivot is my favorite way to make ad hoc reporting systems.
//Users love reports
 
2013-04-30 04:51:04 PM
So what's considered older now?

/35
 
2013-04-30 04:54:12 PM

t3knomanser: 2) Never use Office Interop


Lets be clear here, I hate interop with the heat of a thousand blazing suns.

So I'm really not meaning to suggest anyone use it. But I'm currently contracting in an environment where it is the supported method (makes the head hurt, it really does) but if you are looking to avoid interop, php to xml to excel is not really any better is it.   And for some reason CSV's are "forbidden" in this environment as they are "less secure"   (ow, ow, ow)

/I still don't use interop but it is the supported method here.
//Still other better ways to make office documents than interop.
 
2013-04-30 04:57:35 PM

Mugato: So what's considered older now?


At 42, I'm a dinosaur here.

And what the hell is up with people with 4 years of experience saying they are senior developers in anything?

/not that old as far as I feel
//Still learning.
 
2013-04-30 05:03:34 PM

fst_creeper: //I actually love working with young developers, the energy and enthusiasm is great, you just have to sit on them from time to time.


It's great to work with both older and younger developers.  I get cleaner solutions from older devs and interesting ones from the younger who haven't learned what is impossible.
 
2013-04-30 05:08:32 PM

fst_creeper: php to xml to excel is not really any better is it


Depends on the XML format. I mean, I wouldn't use PHP, and while directly editing the XML in the Excel file isn't the best approach, it's still arguably better than Interop. The "right" answer is the OpenXML SDK.
 
2013-04-30 05:09:28 PM

GiantRex: Speaking as a young programmer,
[www.librarified.net image 250x250]


s1.static.gotsmile.net
 
2013-04-30 05:09:58 PM
Naps?

COMPILING!
 
2013-04-30 05:11:17 PM

jonny_q: UberDave: It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).

Well, according to TFA, many are. So, that's good.

I'm curious what the next paradigm shift will be. I've seen older programmers who understand a lot of concepts, but just never got a handle on object-oriented programming, or loosely-typed interpreted languages. I wonder if that will happen to me. I not afraid of learning a new language or a new technology. I'm afraid that there will come a completely new concept that I just can't get my head around, or I never get around to it because I spend all my time building what I know.


The NoSQL movement seems to be warping people's consciousness.
 
2013-04-30 05:15:26 PM

natmar_76: It's a youth-centric field because employers want to pay less and get more.


I think you forgot to null-terminate your sentence, and so it overflowed into an area of uninitialized memory which made it appear like you were suggesting employers 'get more' by hiring people with less experience.
 
2013-04-30 05:17:45 PM

t3knomanser: The "right" answer is the OpenXML SDK.


The right answer was not to have the user jump through 3 hoops to get a file.

Now I'm amenable to any one step process (to the users perspective) that does not involve interop, because there are several options.

/the ultimate fail on this one was that this was supposed to be a desktop application and yet php?
 
2013-04-30 05:21:19 PM
fst_creeper: Young Developer: "The user can just download it from here, save it as an XML and import the xml into Excel and sort on column X which means I can avoid all the office interop nonsense and code it with (php/ruby/open source buzzword of the week)"

I figured out once that you could trick excel into opening tab delimited data provided as a stream if you forge the mime type.

The end result is that my "export to excel" code in perl looked like this.

while (my @record = sth->fetchrowarray) {print OUT join ("\t", @record);}

// Someone wanted their data output to excel as quickly as possible, so I hacked it into the codebase. Didn't even bother adding it to the UI (that takes time) they had to go to a specific URL to get the output. The SQL statement was hardcoded (ugh). But the end result is that they got their damned data in under an hour.

// later on, a legitimate export feature was added (including stripping unwanted characters before output), but that was about a month or two later.
 
2013-04-30 05:23:54 PM

mcreadyblue: The NoSQL movement seems to be warping people's consciousness.


Eh, a lot of it is just codifying the same lack of relational best practices (like normalization and foreign key constraints) that too many developers already approached classical SQL DBMSes with.
 
2013-04-30 05:27:09 PM
blogs.gartner.com
I'll just leave this here. Keep in mind that this is from 2010... so  not quite up to date.
 
2013-04-30 05:27:10 PM

lordargent: fst_creeper: Young Developer: "The user can just download it from here, save it as an XML and import the xml into Excel and sort on column X which means I can avoid all the office interop nonsense and code it with (php/ruby/open source buzzword of the week)"

I figured out once that you could trick excel into opening tab delimited data provided as a stream if you forge the mime type.

The end result is that my "export to excel" code in perl looked like this.

while (my @record = sth->fetchrowarray) {print OUT join ("\t", @record);}

// Someone wanted their data output to excel as quickly as possible, so I hacked it into the codebase. Didn't even bother adding it to the UI (that takes time) they had to go to a specific URL to get the output. The SQL statement was hardcoded (ugh). But the end result is that they got their damned data in under an hour.

// later on, a legitimate export feature was added (including stripping unwanted characters before output), but that was about a month or two later.


My last job was mostly about getting database information into spreadsheets.

I turned a full day process into a one hour task (with coffee breaks!)

In conclusion: I love Perl so much I could marry it.

/my reward was a hot cocoa sampler box :(
 
2013-04-30 05:32:17 PM

mcreadyblue: jonny_q: UberDave: It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).

Well, according to TFA, many are. So, that's good.

I'm curious what the next paradigm shift will be. I've seen older programmers who understand a lot of concepts, but just never got a handle on object-oriented programming, or loosely-typed interpreted languages. I wonder if that will happen to me. I not afraid of learning a new language or a new technology. I'm afraid that there will come a completely new concept that I just can't get my head around, or I never get around to it because I spend all my time building what I know.

The NoSQL movement seems to be warping people's consciousness.



There's a lot out there to keep up with for sure.  It has its merits/uses...

/XML serialization biatches!!
 
2013-04-30 05:38:49 PM

jonny_q: UberDave: It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).

Well, according to TFA, many are. So, that's good.

I'm curious what the next paradigm shift will be. I've seen older programmers who understand a lot of concepts, but just never got a handle on object-oriented programming, or loosely-typed interpreted languages. I wonder if that will happen to me. I not afraid of learning a new language or a new technology. I'm afraid that there will come a completely new concept that I just can't get my head around, or I never get around to it because I spend all my time building what I know.


I think as long as you keep up with the latest technology and have a willingness to leave your comfort zone, you will be fine.
 
2013-04-30 05:44:41 PM

Diogenes: UberDave: It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).

Right after graduating college, I could white-board a recursive loader for a b-tree upon being asked.  Now, not so much.  But you want me to code an automated interface that picks up data from 10 different XML files where all the elements are strings (even the dates) and place this information in an Oracle 11g database after transforming appropriately including decrypting PII data and have it run on a user settable schedule and have it log success and failures and e-mail failure summaries and have it done quickly and correctly with the ability to deal with inevitable specification changes...No problem.

Um...yeah...well...I can model to 5th Normal Form!!!


I hacked a Gibson.
 
2013-04-30 05:51:24 PM

treesloth: Diogenes: UberDave: It depends on if they kept up their skills and programmed new things but generally, yeah.  I think a lot of older programmers realize (through experience or whatever) that a significant portion of real world coding is knowing how the business works (I think I mentioned this in another thread not too long ago).

Right after graduating college, I could white-board a recursive loader for a b-tree upon being asked.  Now, not so much.  But you want me to code an automated interface that picks up data from 10 different XML files where all the elements are strings (even the dates) and place this information in an Oracle 11g database after transforming appropriately including decrypting PII data and have it run on a user settable schedule and have it log success and failures and e-mail failure summaries and have it done quickly and correctly with the ability to deal with inevitable specification changes...No problem.

Um...yeah...well...I can model to 5th Normal Form!!!

I hacked a Gibson.


733t
 
2013-04-30 05:53:19 PM

poot_rootbeer: natmar_76: It's a youth-centric field because employers want to pay less and get more.

I think you forgot to null-terminate your sentence, and so it overflowed into an area of uninitialized memory which made it appear like you were suggesting employers 'get more' by hiring people with less experience.


What they want and what they get aren't the same thing.
 
2013-04-30 05:56:25 PM
Seems there are some experts here. I'm a geographer who got into GIS during college and somehow missed (read: met a girl and got distracted) the transition to mapping becoming largely an online affair.

I'm really excited by all the cool things that can be done by knowing how to write even just a few lines of code, but I'm so overwhelmed by the options out there. Every language is a shiny object capturing my attention. Any recommendations on how to approach learning how to code or develop (I guess those aren't the same things) and perhaps what to take under consideration when choosing a language(s)?

/n00b
 
2013-04-30 06:13:38 PM
Programming has be iterational.  Old programmers that don't constantly update their skills and education become early retirees. So sure, makes complete sense.

Young programmers have had 30 years of education and constantly updating their credentials.  Old ones still in the industry have.
 
2013-04-30 06:13:39 PM
Employer:  If this doesn't get done by Thursday the entire universe will collapse on itself and you and everyone you love will be vaporized into either!!!!!

23 Year Old Self:    Holy shiat!!!    Okay, I'll get right on it !!   I'll work overtime and nights and weekends and whatever you need.  Really, I don't need sleep.  Let me cancel all my after plans and let everyone know I can't make it.    Holy crap, this is such a huge deal.

vs.

Today's self:     Yeah, that's what you said on the thing we were working on three months ago, and no one has still got around to user testing it.    Need I remind you the Great White Whale Project of 2006 when we all worked 70 hours a week and gave ourselves bleeding ulcers and ate shiatty fast food for 4 months and made our wives/girlfriends hate us  to get that product in under deadline, while you were playing golf twice a week?  Within 6 months we hired a new executive who wanted to scrap it and redisign something identical to what he had at his former employer?    Yeah, you can pretty much go fark yourself.    I've got somewhere to be at 5:30.    It will still be there when I get in at 9:00 tomorrow morning.   If you don't like it, hire another lackey.   I'll be employed within a week .... after I've spent about 4 months backpacking New Zealand.
 
2013-04-30 06:16:45 PM
I see lots of "Interop is evil". and talk about other file formats for Excel.
How then, oh "fark" experts would you suggest I populate word templates, that have to conform to national standards?  I use interop, and it works.  At the time I hated it.  Also the word templates themselves are maintained by a different employee.
 
2013-04-30 06:19:45 PM

fst_creeper: The right answer was not to have the user jump through 3 hoops to get a file.


Every solution I've suggested involves the user doing the onerous task of opening a spreadsheet.

rmcooper4: Any recommendations on how to approach learning how to code or develop (I guess those aren't the same things) and perhaps what to take under consideration when choosing a language(s)?


Start with a problem that you want to solve. Make it a small problem, but have something that's got a clear goal. Other people have almost certainly already solved this problem, but that's okay- you're going to go out and rip them off shamelessly, and then put together your own take on that solution.

So you know what you want to try and do, and you know how other people have done the same thing. How do you want to do it yourself; which language do you want to use? Look at what they did. It worked for them. Imitate. Until you've played around with a few programming languages, you aren't going to have enough experience to know which one is the right tool for which jobs.
 
2013-04-30 06:22:57 PM

Raystorm: How then, oh "fark" experts would you suggest I populate word templates, that have to conform to national standards?


OpenXML SDK, as I said. That's the official way to do it from Microsoft. Interop is fragile, and requires Office installed on whatever machine is generating the output. OpenXML SDK is an API for working with the files directly. There are a bunch of 3rd party libraries that sit on top of it so that it's easier to work with the files.

//I've done a lot of Office document generation.
 
2013-04-30 06:25:32 PM

rmcooper4: Seems there are some experts here. I'm a geographer who got into GIS during college and somehow missed (read: met a girl and got distracted) the transition to mapping becoming largely an online affair.

I'm really excited by all the cool things that can be done by knowing how to write even just a few lines of code, but I'm so overwhelmed by the options out there. Every language is a shiny object capturing my attention. Any recommendations on how to approach learning how to code or develop (I guess those aren't the same things) and perhaps what to take under consideration when choosing a language(s)?

/n00b


Java, everyone loves Java.
 
2013-04-30 06:28:04 PM

DerAppie: Java, everyone loves Java.


You're mean.
 
2013-04-30 06:33:34 PM

t3knomanser: Raystorm: How then, oh "fark" experts would you suggest I populate word templates, that have to conform to national standards?

OpenXML SDK, as I said. That's the official way to do it from Microsoft. Interop is fragile, and requires Office installed on whatever machine is generating the output. OpenXML SDK is an API for working with the files directly. There are a bunch of 3rd party libraries that sit on top of it so that it's easier to work with the files.

//I've done a lot of Office document generation.


I forgot to mention, the app runs client side and is written in C#. Whats the word on office plugins? (I forget the official term). I'm also enforcing document print/save rules to make sure proper logging is maintained and the populated documents cannot be saved.
 
2013-04-30 06:47:09 PM

DerAppie: rmcooper4: Seems there are some experts here. I'm a geographer who got into GIS during college and somehow missed (read: met a girl and got distracted) the transition to mapping becoming largely an online affair.

I'm really excited by all the cool things that can be done by knowing how to write even just a few lines of code, but I'm so overwhelmed by the options out there. Every language is a shiny object capturing my attention. Any recommendations on how to approach learning how to code or develop (I guess those aren't the same things) and perhaps what to take under consideration when choosing a language(s)?

/n00b

Java, everyone loves Java.


Why? Why would you do that to the lad?

/Learn C#
//it's Java
///but it's not
////which is really what everyone wanted all along
/*
 * multi-line slashies.
 */
 
2013-04-30 07:10:26 PM

Because People in power are Stupid: Some old programmers know Kobold

i678.photobucket.com


I LOLed... far too much.

Thank you for the reminder of how old I am, and AD&D as well as coding in some fine traditional languages... it's been awhile (for both).
 
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