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(Boston Herald)   The secret to running an illegal rooming house in Boston is keeping the door closed when city inspectors come knocking   (bostonherald.com) divider line 16
    More: Followup, rooming house, Natick, Town privileges  
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6594 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Apr 2013 at 12:09 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-30 11:35:47 AM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-30 11:51:54 AM  
Yeah, but every time they showed up the house was a rockin'.
 
2013-04-30 12:20:03 PM  
It's tragic because college students were living in the same conditions as just about every illegal immigrant.
 
2013-04-30 12:21:23 PM  
Holy shiat. Done in one
 
2013-04-30 12:23:20 PM  
What do you call two Boston families that only have 19 people between them -- slackers with Protestant tendencies.

The outrage of Inspectional Services (other than the strange name) is that the people are not related, and possibly having unlicensed sex for free.
 
2013-04-30 12:29:16 PM  
I lived in a Boston boarding house that was almost assuredly illegal!

Honestly, I half-expected it to be the subject of the article.  Huge fire hazard (owner was a clothing designer and had racks of dresses EVERYWHERE.  And no fire escapes or anything.)

But nope, it wasn't.
 
2013-04-30 12:38:32 PM  
They left out how much those kids were getting soaked for on the price. That area in Allston? Probably at least $700/mo, maybe a little less, but not much.
 
2013-04-30 12:44:13 PM  
Lived in the same neighborhood when I was at BU.  Paid $625 for a two bedroom with gas heat the the gas company refused to turn on because it was so defective, in 1986
 
2013-04-30 12:54:00 PM  
This being Boston, I just assumed the "inspection" consisted of the inspector knocking on the door, getting handed an envelope of cash, and then checking the appropriate boxes.  Apparently, you don't even have to do that to keep current, just don't bother having one.
 
2013-04-30 02:11:48 PM  
I lived in what was almost certainly an illegal addition once upon a time.  Guy basically slapped a two room, one bath onto the side of his house.  The rent/deposit was cheap and utilities were included.  All in all, I hated living there.  But it was cheap and I needed a place to stay.  Meh.

/Oh, and it was about 5 minutes away from where I worked at the time.
 
2013-04-30 03:12:35 PM  
So are we gonna need a Boston tag soon?
 
2013-04-30 04:51:46 PM  
Lived in 

Cheron: Lived in the same neighborhood when I was at BU.  Paid $625 for a two bedroom with gas heat the the gas company refused to turn on because it was so defective, in 1986


I had a similar experience at BU in the late 80's as well. Shared a townhouse in the same area. Paid more for that shiathole than any place I have lived since. Similar places in the area have indifferent landlords who do the minimum amount of maintenance. They probably do the it themselves, or use unlicensed handymen instead of electricians or plumbers for small jobs. And therein lies the problem.

Like the place I rented, many of the houses in the area have aluminum wiring instead of copper. It was used in residential construction around the time many of those places were built or remodeled - pre 1974. Aluminium wiring is prone to expansion/contraction and oxidation. This requires special connectors, outlets and switches, otherwise you get intermittent connections and a fire hazard. A bad outlet seems like a quick fix - a new outlet, a couple of screws, and you're good as new, but chances are the cheap outlet isn't rated for aluminum. It wasn't unusual to hear crackling from our light switches when you would flip them.

It is not necessary to rewire the whole house, but there is a certain amount of retrofitting that should be done to make it safer. I doubt many of these places have had it done.
 
2013-04-30 05:18:26 PM  

felix_golden: Lived in  Cheron: Lived in the same neighborhood when I was at BU.  Paid $625 for a two bedroom with gas heat the the gas company refused to turn on because it was so defective, in 1986

I had a similar experience at BU in the late 80's as well. Shared a townhouse in the same area. Paid more for that shiathole than any place I have lived since. Similar places in the area have indifferent landlords who do the minimum amount of maintenance. They probably do the it themselves, or use unlicensed handymen instead of electricians or plumbers for small jobs. And therein lies the problem.

Like the place I rented, many of the houses in the area have aluminum wiring instead of copper. It was used in residential construction around the time many of those places were built or remodeled - pre 1974. Aluminium wiring is prone to expansion/contraction and oxidation. This requires special connectors, outlets and switches, otherwise you get intermittent connections and a fire hazard. A bad outlet seems like a quick fix - a new outlet, a couple of screws, and you're good as new, but chances are the cheap outlet isn't rated for aluminum. It wasn't unusual to hear crackling from our light switches when you would flip them.

It is not necessary to rewire the whole house, but there is a certain amount of retrofitting that should be done to make it safer. I doubt many of these places have had it done.


Hell, some of the older places have knob and tube wiring.  Buddy had one he had to re-wire a few years back.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knob_and_tube_wiring
 
2013-04-30 09:02:41 PM  

PunGent: Hell, some of the older places have knob and tube wiring.  Buddy had one he had to re-wire a few years back.


When my friend bought his house in a decent neighborhood of Warwick, RI, he found the knobs still intact around the basement, but as far as he could tell from an inspection none of it was still active. Still was a serious WTF moment to see all that still in existence.
 
2013-05-01 06:46:05 AM  

FriarReb98: PunGent: Hell, some of the older places have knob and tube wiring.  Buddy had one he had to re-wire a few years back.

When my friend bought his house in a decent neighborhood of Warwick, RI, he found the knobs still intact around the basement, but as far as he could tell from an inspection none of it was still active. Still was a serious WTF moment to see all that still in existence.


Heh...had a buddy buy a place years ago, the inspector missed the little fact that the foundation only really ran under ONE of the four walls...rest of the place was basically sitting on dirt.

Lot was too narrow for heavy equipment, so my buddy spent a year of weekends excavating and pouring cement by hand...
 
2013-05-01 09:27:32 PM  

PunGent: FriarReb98: PunGent: Hell, some of the older places have knob and tube wiring.  Buddy had one he had to re-wire a few years back.

When my friend bought his house in a decent neighborhood of Warwick, RI, he found the knobs still intact around the basement, but as far as he could tell from an inspection none of it was still active. Still was a serious WTF moment to see all that still in existence.

Heh...had a buddy buy a place years ago, the inspector missed the little fact that the foundation only really ran under ONE of the four walls...rest of the place was basically sitting on dirt.

Lot was too narrow for heavy equipment, so my buddy spent a year of weekends excavating and pouring cement by hand...


PunGent: FriarReb98: PunGent: Hell, some of the older places have knob and tube wiring.  Buddy had one he had to re-wire a few years back.

When my friend bought his house in a decent neighborhood of Warwick, RI, he found the knobs still intact around the basement, but as far as he could tell from an inspection none of it was still active. Still was a serious WTF moment to see all that still in existence.

Heh...had a buddy buy a place years ago, the inspector missed the little fact that the foundation only really ran under ONE of the four walls...rest of the place was basically sitting on dirt.

Lot was too narrow for heavy equipment, so my buddy spent a year of weekends excavating and pouring cement by hand...


Wait, so what the hell WAS where the foundation should've been??
 
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