Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Sky & Telescope)   Greatest astronomy headline ever   (skyandtelescope.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, NEAF, Sky & Telescope, NASA Administrator, John Grunsfeld, astronomers  
•       •       •

22464 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Apr 2013 at 8:30 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2013-04-30 08:32:15 AM  
Oh look.
A headline as over-rated as the film it's inspired by.

/Monty Python and the Holy Grail isn't that great.
 
2013-04-30 08:35:42 AM  
Good one, but "Scope to probe Uranus" is the headless body of all astronomy headlines.
 
2013-04-30 08:36:45 AM  

Ostman: Oh look.
A headline as over-rated as the film it's inspired by.

/Monty Python and the Holy Grail isn't that great.


Blasphemer!

skepticsannotatedbible.com
 
2013-04-30 08:36:51 AM  
Careful broseph I don't think ripping on Python goes down well around these parts.
 
2013-04-30 08:40:24 AM  

Ostman: Oh look.
A headline as over-rated as the film it's inspired by.

/Monty Python and the Holy Grail isn't that great.


i55.photobucket.com

 
2013-04-30 08:43:02 AM  

Farking Lurker: Careful broseph I don't think ripping on Python goes down well around these parts.


"Let's not bicker and argue over who killed who!"
 
2013-04-30 08:43:35 AM  

steerforth: Good one, but "Scope to probe Uranus" is the headless body of all astronomy headlines.


Spring has Sprung on Uranus
A ringside view of Uranus

etc.
 
2013-04-30 08:45:06 AM  
I thought the best astronomy headline was, Galileo proves heliocentrism, tell Pope to 'suck it'
 
2013-04-30 08:45:49 AM  
Tells. My Italian translation is rusty.
 
2013-04-30 08:51:22 AM  

Badgers: steerforth: Good one, but "Scope to probe Uranus" is the headless body of all astronomy headlines.

Spring has Sprung on Uranus
A ringside view of Uranus

etc.


Mine is obviously made up, but as a journalist, I would die happy if I ever came up with a headline as good as the ringside view.

/NEAF head is all class.
 
2013-04-30 08:52:53 AM  
Ostman...

I fart in your general direction.

8.5/10 - Guaranteed bites on that troll
 
2013-04-30 08:53:00 AM  
Astronomers turn out to be nerds.

stay with Rick Romero as he follows this amazing new development!
 
2013-04-30 08:55:48 AM  
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-04-30 08:58:36 AM  
As usual it looks like my old company decided to skip it because the CEO whined "it is expensive" and then wonders why no one in the astronomy community respects us.
 
2013-04-30 09:03:00 AM  

steerforth: Good one, but "Scope to probe Uranus" is the headless body of all astronomy headlines.


One of my favorite "I can't believe the Dev Team thought of that" moments in gaming history was when you are sending probes down to planets in Mass Effect 2, and try it on Uranus. The computer just asks "Really?"
 
2013-04-30 09:08:03 AM  
Not that anyone's going to care with a headline like that, but I went to that show and saw a bunch of interesting things.  There was an 8" f/3 scope of an unfamiliar design (seriously, who makes their primary a Mangin?) which produces a 41mm diameter flat field for imaging, and its 12" f/3 big brother.  There was a dichroic mirror which sends visible light to your imaging sensor while allowing you to guide on-axis via infrared light, with better accuracy since longer wavelengths are less affected by atmospheric turbulence than shorter wavelengths.  I found it particularly interesting how many products are starting to support non-Windows platforms - with the coming retirement of Windows XP, it sounds like a lot of these companies are looking at the need to make substantial investments in rewriting their drivers.  And Mike Brown ("How I killed Pluto and why it had it coming") was there to give a talk.
 
2013-04-30 09:09:29 AM  
Do movie quotes count?

(Asteroid of death heading towards Earth)

"The person who finds her gets to name her right? I wanna name her Dottie after my wife. She's a vicious life-sucking biatch from which there is no escape..."


/Charter member of the Brooktondale Astrophysical Society. (long story - harmless prank a few decades ago, but I still have my nontransferable membership card that expires March 2062...)
//'Look! There's the old man from Scene 24! What is he doing here?'
 
2013-04-30 09:18:19 AM  

Wade_Wilson: steerforth: Good one, but "Scope to probe Uranus" is the headless body of all astronomy headlines.

One of my favorite "I can't believe the Dev Team thought of that" moments in gaming history was when you are sending probes down to planets in Mass Effect 2, and try it on Uranus. The computer just asks "Really?"


When I'm an 80-year-old woman, living in a house full of feral cats and depending on Depends, I'll still snicker at any attempt to probe Uranus.
 
2013-04-30 09:18:21 AM  

Ostman: Oh look.
A headline as over-rated as the film it's inspired by.

/Monty Python and the Holy Grail isn't that great.


No, be honest, it's a good movie, but quoting it stopped being funny after high school.
 
2013-04-30 09:24:50 AM  

StrangeQ: Ostman: Oh look.
A headline as over-rated as the film it's inspired by.

/Monty Python and the Holy Grail isn't that great.

No, be honest, it's a good movie, but quoting it stopped being funny after high school.


Oh yea? Well.. Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberry. Now go away or I shall taunt you a second time!
 
2013-04-30 09:34:26 AM  
Came here for astronomy discussion, found nothing but lame-ass british "humor". leaving dissapointed.
 
2013-04-30 09:41:40 AM  

miss diminutive: [25.media.tumblr.com image 500x568]


probably clever trollbait, but: The word "Scientist" wasn't really in common usage until the mid 1800's at the earliest, so early skyentists would have been a pun before their time.
 
2013-04-30 09:46:06 AM  

Dr. Goldshnoz: Came here for astronomy discussion, found nothing but lame-ass british "humor". leaving dissapointed.


Lame-arse British "humour" not to your liking, eh, Big Nose?
 
2013-04-30 10:01:27 AM  

Dr. Goldshnoz: Came here for astronomy discussion, found nothing but lame-ass british "humor". leaving dissapointed.


You missed my discussion of NEAF a few posts up?
 
2013-04-30 10:05:16 AM  

ph0rk: miss diminutive: [25.media.tumblr.com image 500x568]

probably clever trollbait, but: The word "Scientist" wasn't really in common usage until the mid 1800's at the earliest, so early skyentists would have been a pun before their time.


Only if future scientists don't go back in time and seed the term, thus the pun, during the Renaissance.

/think about it
//not really
 
2013-04-30 10:09:07 AM  
Sorry, subby, but here's a better one:

i42.tinypic.com
 
2013-04-30 10:18:15 AM  
media.tumblr.com

2nd GIS
 
2013-04-30 10:57:27 AM  

Ostman: Oh look.
A headline as over-rated as the film it's inspired by.

/Monty Python and the Holy Grail isn't that great.


NEAF! NEAF! NEAF! NEAF! NEAF! NEAF! NEAF! NEAF! NEAF!
 
2013-04-30 11:07:21 AM  

Begoggle: [media.tumblr.com image 500x268]

2nd GIS


i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-30 11:16:14 AM  
FTA: "The first dark spot on Uranus, imaged by Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys in August 2006, is possibly a glimmer of more interesting features to come."
 
2013-04-30 11:54:58 AM  

Teknowaffle: As usual it looks like my old company decided to skip it because the CEO whined "it is expensive" and then wonders why no one in the astronomy community respects us.


OK, gotta ask: which company?
 
2013-04-30 12:01:48 PM  

plaidhat: Not that anyone's going to care with a headline like that, but I went to that show and saw a bunch of interesting things.  There was an 8" f/3 scope of an unfamiliar design (seriously, who makes their primary a Mangin?) which produces a 41mm diameter flat field for imaging, and its 12" f/3 big brother.  There was a dichroic mirror which sends visible light to your imaging sensor while allowing you to guide on-axis via infrared light, with better accuracy since longer wavelengths are less affected by atmospheric turbulence than shorter wavelengths.  I found it particularly interesting how many products are starting to support non-Windows platforms - with the coming retirement of Windows XP, it sounds like a lot of these companies are looking at the need to make substantial investments in rewriting their drivers.  And Mike Brown ("How I killed Pluto and why it had it coming") was there to give a talk.


For a long time, f/4 seemed like the limit for amateur scopes.  Now, they're almost commonplace.

www.bbastrodesigns.com
www.bbastrodesigns.com
Mel Bartels' 13" f/3, which folds up into a suitcase.  Has a homemade meniscus mirror and a wire secondary spider.

Details here.

NEAF is also the place to find the ridiculously-expensive new lines of eyepieces with ungodly amounts of glass in them.
 
2013-04-30 12:07:34 PM  
I missed this event in my own hometown? Hmm.
 
2013-04-30 12:44:34 PM  
t2.gstatic.com

Is it?
 
2013-04-30 01:57:45 PM  

Teknowaffle: As usual it looks like my old company decided to skip it because the CEO whined "it is expensive" and then wonders why no one in the astronomy community respects us.


My mom's boss has the same mindset, only at a high school. Their curriculum is utter shiat, and doesn't get replaced because the school model is to be a business and therefore be as cheap as possible.

/A walking argument for why capitalism is not Teh Answer To Everything Amen(tm).
 
2013-04-30 02:52:07 PM  
I was wondering when I'd need this pic.
i40.tinypic.com
 
2013-04-30 09:06:16 PM  

GypsyJoker: plaidhat: Not that anyone's going to care with a headline like that, but I went to that show and saw a bunch of interesting things.  There was an 8" f/3 scope of an unfamiliar design (seriously, who makes their primary a Mangin?) which produces a 41mm diameter flat field for imaging, and its 12" f/3 big brother.  There was a dichroic mirror which sends visible light to your imaging sensor while allowing you to guide on-axis via infrared light, with better accuracy since longer wavelengths are less affected by atmospheric turbulence than shorter wavelengths.  I found it particularly interesting how many products are starting to support non-Windows platforms - with the coming retirement of Windows XP, it sounds like a lot of these companies are looking at the need to make substantial investments in rewriting their drivers.  And Mike Brown ("How I killed Pluto and why it had it coming") was there to give a talk.

For a long time, f/4 seemed like the limit for amateur scopes.  Now, they're almost commonplace.

[www.bbastrodesigns.com image 813x612]
[www.bbastrodesigns.com image 451x648]
Mel Bartels' 13" f/3, which folds up into a suitcase.  Has a homemade meniscus mirror and a wire secondary spider.

Details here.

NEAF is also the place to find the ridiculously-expensive new lines of eyepieces with ungodly amounts of glass in them.


Perhaps then I could interest you in the TEC 300 VT?  It's a scope with 300mm of aperture and a focal ratio of f/1.44.
 
2013-05-01 12:33:51 AM  

plaidhat: GypsyJoker: plaidhat: Not that anyone's going to care with a headline like that, but I went to that show and saw a bunch of interesting things.  There was an 8" f/3 scope of an unfamiliar design (seriously, who makes their primary a Mangin?) which produces a 41mm diameter flat field for imaging, and its 12" f/3 big brother.  There was a dichroic mirror which sends visible light to your imaging sensor while allowing you to guide on-axis via infrared light, with better accuracy since longer wavelengths are less affected by atmospheric turbulence than shorter wavelengths.  I found it particularly interesting how many products are starting to support non-Windows platforms - with the coming retirement of Windows XP, it sounds like a lot of these companies are looking at the need to make substantial investments in rewriting their drivers.  And Mike Brown ("How I killed Pluto and why it had it coming") was there to give a talk.

For a long time, f/4 seemed like the limit for amateur scopes.  Now, they're almost commonplace.

[www.bbastrodesigns.com image 813x612]
[www.bbastrodesigns.com image 451x648]
Mel Bartels' 13" f/3, which folds up into a suitcase.  Has a homemade meniscus mirror and a wire secondary spider.

Details here.

NEAF is also the place to find the ridiculously-expensive new lines of eyepieces with ungodly amounts of glass in them.

Perhaps then I could interest you in the TEC 300 VT?  It's a scope with 300mm of aperture and a focal ratio of f/1.44.


Yeah, but that's an astrograph, more for photography than for visual use.  I don't have the patience for astrophotography.  Oddly enough, I do have the patience for tracking down Abell galaxy clusters and Minkowski planetary nebulae--for which this:

www.wildcard-innovations.com.au

would be a better scope.  (That's a 48" f/4.)
 
2013-05-01 01:59:49 AM  

GypsyJoker: plaidhat: GypsyJoker: plaidhat: Not that anyone's going to care with a headline like that, but I went to that show and saw a bunch of interesting things.  There was an 8" f/3 scope of an unfamiliar design (seriously, who makes their primary a Mangin?) which produces a 41mm diameter flat field for imaging, and its 12" f/3 big brother.  There was a dichroic mirror which sends visible light to your imaging sensor while allowing you to guide on-axis via infrared light, with better accuracy since longer wavelengths are less affected by atmospheric turbulence than shorter wavelengths.  I found it particularly interesting how many products are starting to support non-Windows platforms - with the coming retirement of Windows XP, it sounds like a lot of these companies are looking at the need to make substantial investments in rewriting their drivers.  And Mike Brown ("How I killed Pluto and why it had it coming") was there to give a talk.

For a long time, f/4 seemed like the limit for amateur scopes.  Now, they're almost commonplace.

[www.bbastrodesigns.com image 813x612]
[www.bbastrodesigns.com image 451x648]
Mel Bartels' 13" f/3, which folds up into a suitcase.  Has a homemade meniscus mirror and a wire secondary spider.

Details here.

NEAF is also the place to find the ridiculously-expensive new lines of eyepieces with ungodly amounts of glass in them.

Perhaps then I could interest you in the TEC 300 VT?  It's a scope with 300mm of aperture and a focal ratio of f/1.44.

Yeah, but that's an astrograph, more for photography than for visual use.  I don't have the patience for astrophotography.  Oddly enough, I do have the patience for tracking down Abell galaxy clusters and Minkowski planetary nebulae--for which this:

[www.wildcard-innovations.com.au image 850x568]

would be a better scope.  (That's a 48" f/4.)


Whoa.  Uh.. yeah, I do mostly astrophotography rather than visual, so that sort of astrograph would suit me fine.
 
2013-05-01 10:46:24 AM  

plaidhat: GypsyJoker: plaidhat: GypsyJoker: plaidhat: Not that anyone's going to care with a headline like that, but I went to that show and saw a bunch of interesting things.  There was an 8" f/3 scope of an unfamiliar design (seriously, who makes their primary a Mangin?) which produces a 41mm diameter flat field for imaging, and its 12" f/3 big brother.  There was a dichroic mirror which sends visible light to your imaging sensor while allowing you to guide on-axis via infrared light, with better accuracy since longer wavelengths are less affected by atmospheric turbulence than shorter wavelengths.  I found it particularly interesting how many products are starting to support non-Windows platforms - with the coming retirement of Windows XP, it sounds like a lot of these companies are looking at the need to make substantial investments in rewriting their drivers.  And Mike Brown ("How I killed Pluto and why it had it coming") was there to give a talk.

For a long time, f/4 seemed like the limit for amateur scopes.  Now, they're almost commonplace.

[www.bbastrodesigns.com image 813x612]
[www.bbastrodesigns.com image 451x648]
Mel Bartels' 13" f/3, which folds up into a suitcase.  Has a homemade meniscus mirror and a wire secondary spider.

Details here.

NEAF is also the place to find the ridiculously-expensive new lines of eyepieces with ungodly amounts of glass in them.

Perhaps then I could interest you in the TEC 300 VT?  It's a scope with 300mm of aperture and a focal ratio of f/1.44.

Yeah, but that's an astrograph, more for photography than for visual use.  I don't have the patience for astrophotography.  Oddly enough, I do have the patience for tracking down Abell galaxy clusters and Minkowski planetary nebulae--for which this:

[www.wildcard-innovations.com.au image 850x568]

would be a better scope.  (That's a 48" f/4.)

Whoa.  Uh.. yeah, I do mostly astrophotography rather than visual, so that sort of astrograph would suit me fine.


Looks like a great piece of gear, that astrograph.  What do you currently use?

I just am not tech-savvy or skilled enough to do astrophotography, I guess. I think I prefer the instant gratification of visual work, although I don't even go for Go-To scopes or anything that high tech.  Give me a big ol' Dobsonian with a Telrad and an optical finder, though, and it's star-party time. ("Anyone for some extragalactic globulars?")

Always good to meet a fellow astro-farker, though!
 
2013-05-01 11:09:00 AM  

GypsyJoker: Looks like a great piece of gear, that astrograph.  What do you currently use?

I just am not tech-savvy or skilled enough to do astrophotography, I guess. I think I prefer the instant gratification of visual work, although I don't even go for Go-To scopes or anything that high tech.  Give me a big ol' Dobsonian with a Telrad and an optical finder, though, and it's star-party time. ("Anyone for some extragalactic globulars?")

Always good to meet a fellow astro-farker, though!


I'm currently using a couple scopes by Astro-Tech: AT72ED, which is my favorite thus far for wide field work (3-4° FOV); and AT6RC, when I want to get a little closer in (0.5° FOV).  I had originally gotten the AT72ED to be my guide scope, but I ran into a little problem.  The combined weight of my equipment causes my RA drive motor to stall.  Time to get a new mount...
 
Displayed 41 of 41 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report