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(BBC)   See F. Scott Fitzgerald's online accounts from the 1920s and 30s   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 19
    More: Interesting, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gatsby, Baz Luhrmann, English professor, The Great Gatsby, University of South Carolina  
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5926 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Apr 2013 at 9:06 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-30 09:12:50 AM
The Great Gatsby is one of the worst books ever written.


It reads like what a rich yuppie blog would look like in the 20s/30s.
 
2013-04-30 09:17:07 AM
Wow, he was more ahead of his time than I thought.
 
2013-04-30 09:18:29 AM
I'm looking for the part when he says he has to be at the gym in 26 minutes...
 
2013-04-30 09:21:19 AM
FTFJournal "His mother sent him to school but he wept and wailed so they took him out again after one morning"

Sounds like my son and our most recent t-ball adventure.
 
2013-04-30 09:30:38 AM
http://greatgatsbygame.com

Yes that really exists now
 
2013-04-30 09:31:03 AM
April 10, 1925: TGG drops today. If my work is ever to be retold on the Silver Screen, I can only hope that it will be portrayed in three dimensions instead of merely two. It's what Gatsby would want.
 
2013-04-30 09:35:28 AM

Raharu: The Great Gatsby is one of the worst books ever written.

It reads like what a rich yuppie blog would look like in the 20s/30s.


I concur with these sentiments.  I would also like to add that it was extremely boring.  I also recall my English teacher seeing symbolism in everything within that book.  I'm not talking the obviously symbolic stuff, but a bunch of hindsight analysis of everything being symbolic.  And I remember thinking to myself... there's no way this guy was thinking this shiat up when he wrote it.  I had another english teacher do the same thing with the Watchman book.  For every page he picked out 20 things that were symbolic.  You sure those just weren't the author drawing the background?
 
2013-04-30 09:36:12 AM

Raharu: The Great Gatsby is one of the worst books ever written.


It reads like what a rich yuppie blog would look like in the 20s/30s.


As I'm reading it right now for the first time ever, I have to agree. When I reached the part where he spends the better part of 2 pages to list the various guests at one of Gatsby's parties, I audibly groaned. The whole thing reads like 'Catcher in the Rye', but with less angst and more old money.
 
2013-04-30 09:38:31 AM
FTFA: "We know he didn't spell very well," she said. "And his arithmetic wasn't much better."

What's his Fark handle?
 
2013-04-30 09:51:44 AM
I refuse to read AOL account postings.

//They are still not as bad as the Huffington Post nonsense.
 
2013-04-30 09:54:32 AM
So the BBC engages in shameless movie PR. That is news.

//The $500M movies have a promo budget of $300M. Now you can buy even the BBC
 
2013-04-30 10:21:13 AM
He is buried about 10 miles from me. We could dig him up and ebay whats left.
 
2013-04-30 10:34:25 AM

pkellmey: I refuse to read AOL account postings.

//They are still not as bad as the Huffington Post nonsense.




Yes the valuation was complete nonsense.
 
2013-04-30 11:51:53 AM

Raharu: The Great Gatsby is one of the worst books ever written.


It reads like what a rich yuppie blog would look like in the 20s/30s.


I think that's what he was going for though.  The vapid existences of the nouveau riche.  At least that's what I took away from it.  Doesn't make it any better, but it gives an (overly simplified) explanation.  But I digress, Fark isn't for intellectual conversations on literature.  It's made for fart jokes and .jpegs of scantily clad women.
 
2013-04-30 12:12:29 PM
Savage Bacon Raharu: The Great Gatsby is one of the worst books ever written.


It reads like what a rich yuppie blog would look like in the 20s/30s.


As I'm reading it right now for the first time ever, I have to agree. When I reached the part where he spends the better part of 2 pages to list the various guests at one of Gatsby's parties, I audibly groaned. The whole thing reads like 'Catcher in the Rye', but with less angst and more old money.

Seems to be a lot of hate for the Great Gatsby.  I actually hated reading it in high school (decades ago).   But a year ago, during a time of unemployment, I decided to re-read a bunch of novels from high school lit.   I found I actually enjoyed my second read of The Great Gatsby.  I enjoyed the descriptions which seemed to capture in my mind the times (if you were doing well).  Then again, I love reading Balzac's novels, who was insane in spending pages on describing what went into someone's apartment (including th freaking wallpaper).

And if the themes of hanging out with the upper class has no relation to the reader (like me), then certainly the universal themes of ambition, greed, social snobbery, jealousy and seeking unattainable goals are easy to relate to - atleast for me.

The one book I still dislike is "Catcher in the Rye".  I think that book really IS about old money and being an angsty teen and I simply can't relate.   Also, its far more boring than The Great Gatsby.
 
2013-04-30 01:23:53 PM
"I've been drunk for about a week now, and I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library."

- F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Ch. 3

/west egg-side
 
2013-04-30 03:06:20 PM
He lived in the house across the street from me for a while and people around here revere him simply because he was local and famous.  I think of him as an overrated drunk with slightly less talent than another overrated drunk Hemingway.
 
2013-04-30 03:52:34 PM
Hey, but it's short. It's got that going for it.
 
2013-04-30 06:52:21 PM
Ah, the parties . . . Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald perfected the art of professional party crashing. They were prone to show up at the door uninvited, on all fours and barking like dogs. If they tricked the host into letting them into the house, they might strip naked and take a bath in the master bathroom tub. Zelda frequently shed her clothing in public, and stories abound of her panties or bra coming off at parties.
Literary Rogues: A Scandalous History of WaywardAuthors
by Andrew Shafferpub

Sounds like a fun couple!
 
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