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(The Atlantic)   Orbiting EU telescope runs out of helium to keep instruments cool. If only there were some sort of large temperature differential in space that could be used to keep things cool   (theatlantic.com) divider line 10
    More: Fail, Herschel Space Observatory, telescopes, Measuring instrument, Europe, liquid helium, human beings, XMM-Newton, French Guiana  
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1919 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Apr 2013 at 7:08 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-29 07:11:28 PM  
4 votes:
The Fail tag is for subby's lack of physics knowledge, right?
2013-04-29 06:42:07 PM  
4 votes:
Heat is molecular kinetic energy, Dumbmitter. Not much to transfer that to in a near vacuum.
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-04-29 07:30:29 PM  
3 votes:
Helium is the third most abundant element in the universe, after hydrogen and stupidity.
2013-04-29 05:04:23 PM  
3 votes:
Well, if they're using cryonic gas to cool something, slapping a heatsink on it and exposing it to space probably wont be enough cooling.
2013-04-29 04:45:09 PM  
3 votes:
GAH THE HEAT HAS NO WHERE TO GO. SCIENCE FOOL!
2013-04-29 08:45:25 PM  
1 votes:

rubi_con_man: Honest Bender: Well, if they're using cryonic gas to cool something, slapping a heatsink on it and exposing it to space probably wont be enough cooling.

This -

What they are effectively doing is taking the incident energy - the heat that the telescope is exposed to as well as the heat of the components running, and trying to transport it away to a 'safe' location from which they can get rid of the energy by focusing the heat onto a component which will "shine" and release the energy as light.


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2013-04-29 08:43:09 PM  
1 votes:

Honest Bender: Well, if they're using cryonic gas to cool something, slapping a heatsink on it and exposing it to space probably wont be enough cooling.


This -

What they are effectively doing is taking the incident energy - the heat that the telescope is exposed to as well as the heat of the components running, and trying to transport it away to a 'safe' location from which they can get rid of the energy by focusing the heat onto a component which will "shine" and release the energy as light.
2013-04-29 08:11:47 PM  
1 votes:

Honest Bender: Well, if they're using cryonic gas to cool something, slapping a heatsink on it and exposing it to space probably wont be enough cooling.


Exposing it to space would actually provide unwanted heating, not cooling.

The temperature of deep space (cosmic microwave background radiation) is about 2.7K. The boiling helium on this spacecraft cooled the instruments to 1.7K, and additional cooling systems took some detectors down to 0.3K (section 2.1.1.2).
2013-04-29 07:16:17 PM  
1 votes:
I'm just here to pile on the Submitter, who clearly has no idea how heat transfer or cooling systems work.
2013-04-29 07:11:44 PM  
1 votes:
Mean kinetic energy - how does it work?!
 
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