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(The Atlantic)   Orbiting EU telescope runs out of helium to keep instruments cool. If only there were some sort of large temperature differential in space that could be used to keep things cool   (theatlantic.com) divider line 68
    More: Fail, Herschel Space Observatory, telescopes, Measuring instrument, Europe, liquid helium, human beings, XMM-Newton, French Guiana  
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1919 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Apr 2013 at 7:08 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-29 11:15:17 PM

Cpl.D: "I'm sick of this farking Lagrange and I'm sick of his farking points!"

Naw, not really.

"And this, my lord, is how we know two of the Lagrange points to be banana shaped."


They got a lot of nice girls.
 
2013-04-29 11:52:48 PM
No, subby is correct. Heat works by being attracted to itself. Bigger masses of heat attracts heat more strongly, which is why the sun is so hot. This will allow the telescope to cool off because the heat will be attracted out of the telescope and towards the sun.
 
2013-04-30 12:33:53 AM
So there hasn't been much information in the comments here other than "you stupid submitter!"

For anyone actually interested in learning about why a vacuum is a good insulator, check out the wikipedia page for blackbody radiation:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black-body_radiation
 
2013-04-30 12:43:05 AM

Jim_Callahan: Old Man Winter: GAH THE HEAT HAS NO WHERE TO GO. SCIENCE FOOL!

Heat transfer has a radiation term, actually, convection dominates under most conditions in the region of temperature and pressure we live in, but for very high temperatures and low pressures radiation can be a significant or even dominant factor.

But yes, since optical instruments tend to run at room temperature or lower (and radiation scales with T^4) you're going to have to rely mostly on some form of evaporation-based cooling out in space where there's no ambient convection or conduction.  A system capable of cooling based on EM emission alone would need a farkton of surface area, which would backfire if your device ever saw the sun.


If this thing were operating at anywhere near room temperature, they could get away with radiative cooling as long as it was well shielded from the sun.  But, since this is an ultra sensitive infrared telescope, it needs to be very close to absolute zero.
 
2013-04-30 01:24:13 AM

torusXL: Bigger masses of heat attracts heat more strongly, which is why the sun is so hot.


www.partyviberadio.com
 
2013-04-30 01:59:10 AM

jfarkinB: Raoul Eaton: It's just really hard to mine it from the core of a star.  Helium, I mean, not stupidity.

I believe that on Earth the main source of it is in Texas.

Nicely done.


Stupidity that is in Texas right? Or is that Florida?
 
2013-04-30 02:01:14 AM

phlatulence: jfarkinB: Raoul Eaton: It's just really hard to mine it from the core of a star.  Helium, I mean, not stupidity.

I believe that on Earth the main source of it is in Texas.

Nicely done.

Stupidity that is in Texas right? Or is that Florida?


I thought he was just talking about hot air.

/Texas is full of that too, and I'm not commenting on the weather
 
2013-04-30 02:03:59 AM

Peki: phlatulence: jfarkinB: Raoul Eaton: It's just really hard to mine it from the core of a star.  Helium, I mean, not stupidity.

I believe that on Earth the main source of it is in Texas.

Nicely done.

Stupidity that is in Texas right? Or is that Florida?

I thought he was just talking about hot air.

/Texas is full of that too, and I'm not commenting on the weather


If only they weren't so dense, they could escape earth like helium! Texans and Floridians that is.
 
2013-04-30 02:16:10 AM

torusXL: No, subby is correct. Heat works by being attracted to itself. Bigger masses of heat attracts heat more strongly, which is why the sun is so hot. This will allow the telescope to cool off because the heat will be attracted out of the telescope and towards the sun.


cdn.overclock.net
 
2013-04-30 02:22:53 AM

phlatulence: Peki: phlatulence: jfarkinB: Raoul Eaton: It's just really hard to mine it from the core of a star.  Helium, I mean, not stupidity.

I believe that on Earth the main source of it is in Texas.

Nicely done.

Stupidity that is in Texas right? Or is that Florida?

I thought he was just talking about hot air.

/Texas is full of that too, and I'm not commenting on the weather

If only they weren't so dense, they could escape earth like helium! Texans and Floridians that is.


And the world would be way better off. . .

Hey. . . isn't there an article about applications to Mars a few threads down???
 
2013-04-30 07:41:31 AM
You'd think in this day and age they'd of designed such machines to have replenish-able consumables.  I mean they knew it'd eventually burn through its coolant supply and most likely still have science to do so which is cheaper:  a brand new telescope or a simpler robot 'tug' satellite that can slowly trundle up and refuel it?

Sure getting anything in to space is expensive as all get out but surely a fuel bowser is cheaper than a replacement telescope.

And I'm not even touching the headline with yours let alone mine.
 
2013-04-30 08:09:50 AM

cretinbob: torusXL: No, subby is correct. Heat works by being attracted to itself. Bigger masses of heat attracts heat more strongly, which is why the sun is so hot. This will allow the telescope to cool off because the heat will be attracted out of the telescope and towards the sun.

[cdn.overclock.net image 200x200]


actually this makes sense.  It's like when you put your hand on a hot stove, the damage is caused from the heat being stolen from your hand to the stove so fast, the friction hurts your hand.
 
2013-04-30 08:13:16 AM

Cpl.D: "I'm sick of this farking Lagrange and I'm sick of his farking points!"

Naw, not really.

"And this, my lord, is how we know two of the Lagrange points to be banana shaped."


Best classical mechanics-Monty Python mashup ever.
 
2013-04-30 12:45:11 PM
good lord my favorites list has been filling up lately
 
2013-04-30 03:10:12 PM

Peki: phlatulence: Peki: phlatulence: jfarkinB: Raoul Eaton: It's just really hard to mine it from the core of a star.  Helium, I mean, not stupidity.

I believe that on Earth the main source of it is in Texas.

Nicely done.

Stupidity that is in Texas right? Or is that Florida?

I thought he was just talking about hot air.

/Texas is full of that too, and I'm not commenting on the weather

If only they weren't so dense, they could escape earth like helium! Texans and Floridians that is.

And the world would be way better off. . .

Hey. . . isn't there an article about applications to Mars a few threads down???


Yep, just make it sound attractive and cover up the asylum signs when they arrive
 
2013-04-30 10:14:16 PM

Vaneshi: You'd think in this day and age they'd of designed such machines to have replenish-able consumables.  I mean they knew it'd eventually burn through its coolant supply and most likely still have science to do so which is cheaper:  a brand new telescope or a simpler robot 'tug' satellite that can slowly trundle up and refuel it?

Sure getting anything in to space is expensive as all get out but surely a fuel bowser is cheaper than a replacement telescope.

And I'm not even touching the headline with yours let alone mine.



It's a nice thought but the cost of building and launching a second spacecraft for the purpose of replenishing consumables is far too great.  The best bang per buck is to build a satellite, use it as best you can on its finite reserves and then abandon it when it either breaks down or runs out of consumables.
 
2013-05-01 12:41:31 AM

You Are All Sheep: cretinbob: torusXL: No, subby is correct. Heat works by being attracted to itself. Bigger masses of heat attracts heat more strongly, which is why the sun is so hot. This will allow the telescope to cool off because the heat will be attracted out of the telescope and towards the sun.

[cdn.overclock.net image 200x200]

actually this makes sense.  It's like when you put your hand on a hot stove, the damage is caused from the heat being stolen from your hand to the stove so fast, the friction hurts your hand.


Exactly! I think your name speaks for itself.
 
2013-05-01 01:10:21 AM
*sigh* That beautiful carbide mirror...

:(
 
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