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(Phys Org2)   New discovery alters understanding of long-distance intercellular communication. Will be bought and buried by AT&T, Verizon, Microsoft, etc   (phys.org) divider line 17
    More: Cool, New Discovery, intercellular communication, Stanford University School of Medicine, packed red blood cells, connective tissues, developmental biology, uc san francisco, imaging science  
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2814 clicks; posted to Geek » on 29 Apr 2013 at 11:43 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-29 11:48:08 AM
Awesome. We're exploring how matter organizes itself into life. Pay attention folks!
 
2013-04-29 11:51:58 AM
OK, that is a fascinating discovery.  Targeted signalling makes sense, though.
 
2013-04-29 11:57:05 AM
Much more efficient method of ensuring specific cellular material delivery than your mom is used to.
 
2013-04-29 11:59:35 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: Awesome. We're exploring how matter organizes itself into life. Pay attention folks!


Eh, that's a bit more low level than this.  This is more like exploring how single cellular life manages to organize itself into multicellular life.
 
2013-04-29 12:42:05 PM
In the office of a cell-network optimization company, so getting a kick

/Office Support Tech. I generate the reports.
 
2013-04-29 01:01:43 PM
Interesting, and these weren't seen before due to the preserving techniques destroying them? It's fascinating how advancements in one science can aid another, even in areas we thought were pretty well mapped out (such as: "This is what a cell looks like", but apparently there were bits missing from the printer)


Quantum Apostrophe: Awesome. We're exploring how matter organizes itself into life. Pay attention folks!


Close, but not quite? Watching matter organize itself into life would be more akin to parthenogensis, like trying to nudge chemicals to form amino acids, and then those amino acids to form into proteins, and then those proteins to form into simple life. There IS research on that front, though I don't think they've figured it out yet? As far as we know, matter's only assembled itself into *LIFE* once, or, at most, a few times. It's possible that these experiments are difficult, simply due to the timescales required. Still, it'll be neat when they figure it out.

This is more about life building *other* life, or building itself up. Sort of like a robot programmed to build a rocket, in a sense-The cells are communicating with each other in the developmental stages. Like if you stuck 3-D printers on a bunch of roombas and gave them some complex programming.
 
2013-04-29 01:19:41 PM

Summercat: In the office of a cell-network optimization company, so getting a kick

/Office Support Tech. I generate the reports.


Did you get the memo about putting covers on those things?
 
2013-04-29 01:41:00 PM

Marine1: Summercat: In the office of a cell-network optimization company, so getting a kick

/Office Support Tech. I generate the reports.

Did you get the memo about putting covers on those things?


I'm not the one who collates and sends them out :v
 
2013-04-29 02:54:41 PM
Microsoft? I bet subby is more than 30 years old...

/Apple patented fuel cell powered phones so no one else could make them
 
2013-04-29 03:12:33 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Awesome. We're exploring how matter organizes itself into life. Pay attention folks!


How can this be used in space exploration?
 
2013-04-29 04:19:56 PM
I read it as "interstellar" at first and was quickly disappointed.
 
2013-04-29 04:20:57 PM
Barna and her colleagues began the study by wondering how signaling molecules important in development, such as one called sonic hedgehog, or SHH, move from cell to cell in a developing chick embryo.

What?
 
2013-04-29 04:46:44 PM

LightRider: Barna and her colleagues began the study by wondering how signaling molecules important in development, such as one called sonic hedgehog, or SHH, move from cell to cell in a developing chick embryo.

What?


That's a gene. Named Sonic Hedgehog. Not sure if the researches knew it would wind up being important when they named it.

There's also a unit of cross-sectional area in physics called a Barn. Yes, as in "The broadside of". It is not a person's name.

Scientists: We have farking weird senses of humor.
 
2013-04-29 09:29:11 PM

Just Another OC Homeless Guy: Quantum Apostrophe: Awesome. We're exploring how matter organizes itself into life. Pay attention folks!

How can this be used in space exploration?


I'm still waiting to be kidnapped by space cadets like in Archer.
 
2013-04-29 11:00:47 PM
Could someone please explain the article in a simpler way?  Perhaps you could dumb it down to the MBA level.

/ many thanks.
 
2013-04-30 12:30:21 AM
I wonder if neurons are a more evolved version of this discovery.
 
2013-04-30 07:35:57 AM

MBA Whore: Could someone please explain the article in a simpler way?  Perhaps you could dumb it down to the MBA level.

/ many thanks.


Here's the gist of it:

It involves cell communucation (Hey brah, we done growing these structures yet? IS it ttime to move on to the next bit?) This is important in, say, embryro development, because you NEED some things to form before others. The order of opperation matters. So there MUST be some way for cells to 'communicate' when they're done with task X, and they/other cells can start task Y.

We felt/thought cells communicated with distant cells (Hey, dude, I'm done growing my part, you done? We need to do something else yet?") by releasing chemicals, and just letting those chemicals 'drift' to the distant cells.

While this is still a possible communication method, it appears that we have also discovered there are tiny 'extensions' of the cells, like super-long tendrils, that can touch and communicate (probably still chemically?) with other, distant cells THAT way. These tendrils have not been observed before because they were actually  destroyed by the process of preparing the cells for observation. Advances in imaging technology have caused us to see them for the first time.

I suspect there may be a number of birth defects that are caused, among other things, by errors in this communication. ("WTF dude why did you make the heart? We don't even have a chest to put it in yet! Eh we'll just stick it ont he outside"), but I don't know this.

Caveat: I am not a doctor or a biologist, just a physicist.
 
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