If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(AZCentral)   People in Phoenix are cashing in by converting their homes into unregulated sober-houses for recovering addicts. What could go wrong?   (azcentral.com) divider line 6
    More: Strange, Ordinances of 1311, Avondale, sober house, reasonable accommodation, addictions, group homes  
•       •       •

5042 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Apr 2013 at 8:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-04-28 10:28:31 AM  
1 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Well, aside from the obvious problem that convicted offenders on parole are usually prohibited from living with other offenders in unlicensed treatment facilities...

/aside from that... I hope it goes well. We need more care centers and halfway houses and less imprisonment.


I am pleased to agree.
2013-04-28 10:27:25 AM  
1 votes:
These places are a great idea, if you are the one running them. My wife's employer owns one of these places and he uses the residents as cheap labor for his businesses. Pays everyone under the table, takes living expenses directly from their paychecks and regularly screws them over with the rest of their money if half of what gets relayed back to me is true.
2013-04-28 10:00:39 AM  
1 votes:

MFK: I heard about this a couple weeks ago. It's a way that landlords can cram up to 4 people per bedroom at the cost of $150+ per week. Obviously, while not all sober houses are blatant cash grabs and do provide a service for recovering addicts, more and more of them are turning out to be just a way for landlords to take advantage of people at their lowest point. Totally unregulated and unequipped to deal with the problems that people in recovery face.

It's like that scene in Weeds where Kevin Nealon's character gets caught running a fake charity so tries to cover for it by turning his office into a homeless shelter.


$150/week is a fair rate for hostel dorm style living quarters.  Sober houses are places to live, not treatment centers.

I wish TFA explained the taxes and permit fees the towns want.
2013-04-28 09:41:25 AM  
1 votes:

spawn73: MFK: I heard about this a couple weeks ago. It's a way that landlords can cram up to 4 people per bedroom at the cost of $150+ per week. Obviously, while not all sober houses are blatant cash grabs and do provide a service for recovering addicts, more and more of them are turning out to be just a way for landlords to take advantage of people at their lowest point. Totally unregulated and unequipped to deal with the problems that people in recovery face.

Who's paying for that?

If they're unofficial, then it can't be the public? If it's themselves, why don't they just rent a motel room for that kind of money.


I was debating getting involved, but I see no one else is really touching the numbers.

I'm vaguely tapped into the industry as far as our IT company supports a few of the operators in South Florida.

Average 2 or 3 bdr house rents for 1.2 to 1.5k / mo.

Sober house owner can get about 1k per room per month.  They can divide the rooms however they want.  Multiple beds per 'dorm' are normal and expected by the clients.

You can have up to I believe it's five unrelated people under one roof in a 30 day period.  This is why so many stop at 28 days.  This is a Single Family Dwelling.  Multi Family Dwelling is more, but costs more.  You have to get a license from the state and city, and a fire inspection.  Usually costs under $1k all in.  You can buy the house outright and churn it that way, if you want.  That's why so many junk homes are being grabbed for peanuts and rolled into the system.

Who's paying for this?  You.  Addiction is covered by the ADA and most major insurers.  An IOP provider may also take private money, of course.  See Celebrity Sober Houses.

Average insurance payout for an IOP program is $15 to 20k.  Average IOP stay is 30 days.  Office rent is $2k a month.  Light advertising brings in two to three clients a day.  You do the math.

Ancillaries like payroll and licensing are peanuts.  The people I work for hire someone new just about once a week.  They buy a new computer or tablet probably every two days.  All the owners have new cars and multiple new cars, and are buying new homes.

This is free money.  I don't know any industry that can print money like this, but I have never worked in oil or other energy sector.

Doesn't sound so bad, except that the property owner doesn't give a shiat about the property.  The kids all hang around smoking (since that's the only vice allowed to them now) and littering.  Land owners hate them.  City hates them but will take the money.  Can't do anything to them because ADA and Fair Housing Act is protected class.

The cost of entry into the business to start your own program is probably less than 10k.
2013-04-28 09:00:29 AM  
1 votes:

MFK: $150+ per week


around here the going rate for a room at a sober house is around 300-350/month, which makes it very affordable for someone who needs a little time to get their shiat together working a part time job and saving up a bit of money
2013-04-28 08:49:25 AM  
1 votes:
Well, aside from the obvious problem that convicted offenders on parole are usually prohibited from living with other offenders in unlicensed treatment facilities...

/aside from that... I hope it goes well. We need more care centers and halfway houses and less imprisonment.
 
Displayed 6 of 6 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report