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(Sun Journal (Maine))   Not news: Running out of gas and having to pull over and call for help on the Maine Turnpike. News: You're driving a Cessna. Fark: You're a Maine Game Warden   (sunjournal.com) divider line 53
    More: Scary, game wardens, gas  
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3671 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Apr 2013 at 10:53 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-04-27 10:12:05 AM
In Massachusetts the Turnpike Authority felt the need to write a regulation specifically governing use of the Turnpike by aircraft. (Now codified at 700 CMR 7.05(6).)
 
2013-04-27 10:28:19 AM
 How in Gods name does one run out of gas when flying?  Forgetting your carburetor heat, maybe.  Forgetting to set the flaps, maybe.  But ignoring your gas gauge?  Yikes.

/when the tank says 1/2 full, it's time to tank up
 
2013-04-27 10:56:41 AM
The plane in Maine falls mainly in the left lane.
 
2013-04-27 10:58:17 AM
Randell Greenleaf will forever be known as a pessimist.  How many events we have every year of stuff like this and rarely someone is hurt or the plane is even damaged?  Way express your desire to see blood, gore and destruction first hand Randell.
 
2013-04-27 10:58:53 AM
Wouldn't drones be more suited(and cheaper) for game warden stuff?

/for instance shouldn't you be paying more attention when flying
 
2013-04-27 11:00:36 AM
edition.channel5belize.com
Interstate roads were required to have areas with one mile straight sections to be used as runways.
 
2013-04-27 11:01:03 AM
It's because of that new DOT regulation that says we can't have any in-dash instrument available during vehicle operation.
 
2013-04-27 11:05:43 AM
looking as fuel guages is such a hassel.
 
2013-04-27 11:06:30 AM

shifty lookin bleeder: The plane in Maine falls mainly in the left lane.



and THAT can be a pain.
 
2013-04-27 11:06:57 AM
I heard the state was in a dire financial situation, but this is ridiculous.
 
2013-04-27 11:11:05 AM

Marcus Aurelius: How in Gods name does one run out of gas when flying?  Forgetting your carburetor heat, maybe.  Forgetting to set the flaps, maybe.  But ignoring your gas gauge?  Yikes.

/when the tank says 1/2 full, it's time to tank up


At 7 pounds per gallon that adds a lot of extra weight.
 
2013-04-27 11:13:18 AM

haterade: Wouldn't drones be more suited(and cheaper) for game warden stuff?

/for instance shouldn't you be paying more attention when flying


I imagine the cost of a new drone with all of the cameras you'd need to get the panoramic view a biologist would want is far in excess of the cost of the probably already paid for 1968 Cessna. Even with a drone, you'd still need to pay the pilot and the biologist. Sometimes the lower tech still works just fine. Well, except when you forget to gas up.
 
2013-04-27 11:15:12 AM

smitty04: Marcus Aurelius: How in Gods name does one run out of gas when flying?  Forgetting your carburetor heat, maybe.  Forgetting to set the flaps, maybe.  But ignoring your gas gauge?  Yikes.

/when the tank says 1/2 full, it's time to tank up

At 7 pounds per gallon that adds a lot of extra weight.


So does engine oil, so let's drain some of that out.  And the left part of the elevators, who needs that extra drag?  And clothing is heavy too, so better strip naked before take-off.
 
2013-04-27 11:17:23 AM
Why no dumbass or stupid tag?
 
2013-04-27 11:25:20 AM
007 did this in the 80's  ;)

www.aerospaceweb.org
 
2013-04-27 11:26:45 AM
Maine Game Wardens are without question, one of two things. Flaming a-holes or downright good guys. Depends which one you deal with. On second thought, you can probably say that about any LEO.
 
2013-04-27 11:27:21 AM

buzzcut73: haterade: Wouldn't drones be more suited(and cheaper) for game warden stuff?

/for instance shouldn't you be paying more attention when flying

I imagine the cost of a new drone with all of the cameras you'd need to get the panoramic view a biologist would want is far in excess of the cost of the probably already paid for 1968 Cessna. Even with a drone, you'd still need to pay the pilot and the biologist. Sometimes the lower tech still works just fine. Well, except when you forget to gas up.


It's just as easy to forget to gas up the $1m drone as it is to forget about the $20k cessna.  And probably a lot more tempting to push it to E since there's no "immediate" life in danger.

Side note, I enjoyed the part of flight training where the instructor cuts it to idle, opens the door and teaches you to do an unpowered glide-in for prep in such a situation as this.
 
2013-04-27 11:29:32 AM

How would C.J.Box have Warden Joe Pickett handle this situation?


poisonedpen.com
 
2013-04-27 11:34:13 AM
ts3.mm.bing.net
This might have been a hint.
 
2013-04-27 11:36:01 AM

Sugarbombs: Side note, I enjoyed the part of flight training where the instructor cuts it to idle, opens the door and teaches you to do an unpowered glide-in for prep in such a situation as this.


Glad i wasn't the only one.
 
2013-04-27 11:38:21 AM

John Buck 41: Flaming a-holes or downright good guys.


At least you covered all the bases.
 
2013-04-27 11:39:29 AM

stuffy: [ts3.mm.bing.net image 174x177]
This might have been a hint.


It is a Cessna they look like this

www.weekendcfii.com

Oh and you are supposed to do a visual inspection during the pre-flight
 
2013-04-27 11:50:01 AM

Tom_Slick: stuffy: [ts3.mm.bing.net image 174x177]
This might have been a hint.

It is a Cessna they look like this

[www.weekendcfii.com image 600x450]

Oh and you are supposed to do a visual inspection during the pre-flight


And we all know what a hassle that is.  You know this warden had a couple of thousand hours in a Cessna, and probably walked around while he released the tie downs, didn't feel like climbing up on the wings, and took off with at "fark it, it'll be fine" attitude.  Lots of Cessna/Super Cub drivers do.  What would be even funnier is if he forgot to turn the selector from L or R to Both, and he had a full tank of gas in the other wing.
 
2013-04-27 11:56:54 AM
When  I was learning to fly aerobatics, I used to do it over the Atlantic City Expressway. If I blew the engine, I had a nice grass strip in between the lanes to land on, and having highway below made a nice reference line for counting spins...
 
2013-04-27 12:01:57 PM

devildog123: And we all know what a hassle that is. You know this warden had a couple of thousand hours in a Cessna, and probably walked around while he released the tie downs, didn't feel like climbing up on the wings, and took off with at "fark it, it'll be fine" attitude. Lots of Cessna/Super Cub drivers do. What would be even funnier is if he forgot to turn the selector from L or R to Both, and he had a full tank of gas in the other wing.


You are right of course, I must be paranoid I always check mine even when I know I put it away at 3/4 of a tank.
 
2013-04-27 12:06:40 PM
no 1942 film photos ??? im disapointed
 
2013-04-27 12:08:58 PM

Kurmudgeon: John Buck 41: Flaming a-holes or downright good guys.

At least you covered all the bases.


Well, I tried. What I meant was one exagerrated extreme or the other; nothing middle-of-the-road. Like where he landed this plane, nyuk, nyuk.
 
2013-04-27 12:10:18 PM

Tom_Slick: stuffy: [ts3.mm.bing.net image 174x177]
This might have been a hint.

It is a Cessna they look like this

[www.weekendcfii.com image 600x450]

Oh and you are supposed to do a visual inspection during the pre-flight


They are also legally required to be accurate only when registering empty.  The only way to be sure is a dipstick and a watch.
 
2013-04-27 12:13:07 PM
Holy crap! A Maine Game Warden?!?! That is farked. Way to pick out the most farkiest of facts.
 
2013-04-27 12:17:46 PM
JH3675: They are also legally required to be accurate only when registering empty.  The only way to be sure is a dipstick and a watch.

They're supposed to be correct when they're full, as well. Different models have different calibration requirements and some of them are pretty accurate. But that's an old, old aircraft pictured in the article, and I'd trust those gauges to do nothing more than draw some current from the electrical system.
 
2013-04-27 12:29:15 PM

JH3675: The only way to be sure is a dipstick and a watch


And ball bearings.  Don't forget the ball bearings.
 
2013-04-27 12:41:44 PM
Running out of gas trifecta is now in play I'VE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS FOR YEARS OMG FINALLY
 
2013-04-27 12:43:09 PM
Next time, on North Woods Law....

/Hope this make it in to next season.
 
2013-04-27 12:44:22 PM
Landing without fuel at an airport would give the pilot just a much grief, especially if jets carrying the important people were inconvenienced by an emergency landing.

Most of the up-in-the-air floating gas stations were sequestered. That's where the UFOs refuel. And you haven't heard much about UFOs for a week.
 
2013-04-27 12:46:44 PM

Linux_Yes: shifty lookin bleeder: The plane in Maine falls mainly in the left lane.


and THAT can be a pain.


You're a clever one.
 
2013-04-27 01:02:20 PM
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2013-04-27 01:02:47 PM
You do have to keep an eye out for the overpasses.....

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-27 01:06:45 PM

Hot Carl To Go: Linux



i'm a poet and didn't know it.


so i see!  said the blind man talking to his daughter on the disconnected telephone line.


Balls!  said the Queen
If i had 'em i'd be King.

the king left because he had two
the Queen left because she wanted two.
 
2013-04-27 01:09:39 PM

Hot Carl To Go: Linux_Yes: shifty lookin bleeder: The plane in Maine falls mainly in the left lane.


and THAT can be a pain.

You're a clever one.



there once was a old lady from keith    (england)
who would circumcise men with her teeth.
it wasn't for Fame
or love of the Game,
but to get at the cheese underneath.


there once was a young lady from drew
who said, as the bishop withdrew,
the vicar is quicker, and slicker and thicker
and 4 inches longer than you.
 
2013-04-27 01:14:32 PM
Ya caan't git they-ah from he-ya.
 
2013-04-27 01:27:44 PM
Jesus man. I know how much fuel is in each of my 4 cars... and my lawn equipment./nice twin prop on the state dime//lookin for a cess if anyone has anything in gulf coast. Will trade daughters. Eip
 
2013-04-27 01:59:36 PM
I have a Piper 180 and looking in the tanks during the checklist and after being fueled plus two  fuel samples after it has been topped off is a no brainer.
 It is about the same hassle to crawl under to take the sample on a low wing as it is to whip the 2 step ladder out of a high wing and eyeballing your tanks is cheap insurance.. My airplane holds 48 gallons usable and burns 8 to 12 gallons an hour and this is what determines when it is time for a fuel stop.Fuel indicators are right on the money and are used to compare with fuel burn/hr that is figured with good old math.
In this case maybe he was low on fuel, did not take fuel samples to see all the water in it and it plain old quit without enough time to attempt a restart, maybe carb ice and the cable broke when he applied it or maybe he did run out of fuel.
I guarantee the F.A.A. will be talking to him and informing him  what  procedure he did  not follow
 
2013-04-27 03:08:32 PM
Not news: Running out of gas and having to pull over and call for help on the Maine Turnpike. News: You're driving a Cessna. Fark: You're a Maine Game Warden

I think you got News and Fark backward.
 
2013-04-27 04:47:34 PM

Marcus Aurelius: How in Gods name does one run out of gas when flying?  Forgetting your carburetor heat, maybe.  Forgetting to set the flaps, maybe.  But ignoring your gas gauge?  Yikes.

/when the tank says 1/2 full, it's time to tank up


You use the fuel gauges in an old Cessna? That's balls. I've never seen one that worked properly. The needles flail around like windsocks in Wyoming. Check that fuel visually on pre-flight.
 
2013-04-27 05:28:46 PM

smitty04: Marcus Aurelius: How in Gods name does one run out of gas when flying?  Forgetting your carburetor heat, maybe.  Forgetting to set the flaps, maybe.  But ignoring your gas gauge?  Yikes.

/when the tank says 1/2 full, it's time to tank up

At 7 pounds per gallon that adds a lot of extra weight.


Well, avgas is ~6lbs per gallon. Jet-a is ~7lbs per gallon. This Cessna single engine is likely avgas. You are required to keep a 30 min reserve for day and 45 min reserve for night flights in VFR conditions. For many planes, this is somewhere between 5 and 10 gallons. (daytime)

Also, gas gauges in airplanes are horrible. They are subject to sloshing, even when they work. You don't fly an airplane by the gas gauges, you fly by performance calculations and (if you have one) a fuel flow meter. Flying is a mathematical (mental) and physical exercise. You use a stick in the tanks before flight so that you have a close (I always figure it's off a 1/4 gallon in the wrong direction for each calculation) idea of what you're starting with, and then the math starts...
 
2013-04-27 05:43:05 PM

costermonger: JH3675: They are also legally required to be accurate only when registering empty.  The only way to be sure is a dipstick and a watch.

They're supposed to be correct when they're full, as well. Different models have different calibration requirements and some of them are pretty accurate. But that's an old, old aircraft pictured in the article, and I'd trust those gauges to do nothing more than draw some current from the electrical system.


I have a friend that flies a nearly new Malibu Meridian. He trusts his fuel gauges as much as I trust mine. Fuel gauges can fail, heck they can fail mid flight. You do the math yourself, and double-check, and you'll probably never run out of fuel.

Useless things in aviation:

The runway behind you
The air above you
The fuel left in the truck
 
2013-04-27 05:45:59 PM
inglixthemad:  This Cessna single engine is likely avgas.

Do you think there's any chance the one in TFA could be running on mogas? The pilot glided it in at about 9:00 am, and by 11:15 am the troopers closed the highway to let it take off again. Two hours and change is not very long for them to call in out of gas, fart around with bureaucracy and dispatchers, and get someone out there with a half-dozen cans full of avgas. But it is enough time to stand around scratching their heads for a few minutes, peek under the cowling to make sure nothing's obviously broken, pump it full of mogas from the gas pumps right there where it taxied in, and get a couple of deputies to block traffic for the departure.
 
2013-04-27 06:23:59 PM
Nailed it
 
2013-04-27 06:25:48 PM

Miss Nova: inglixthemad:  This Cessna single engine is likely avgas.

Do you think there's any chance the one in TFA could be running on mogas? The pilot glided it in at about 9:00 am, and by 11:15 am the troopers closed the highway to let it take off again. Two hours and change is not very long for them to call in out of gas, fart around with bureaucracy and dispatchers, and get someone out there with a half-dozen cans full of avgas. But it is enough time to stand around scratching their heads for a few minutes, peek under the cowling to make sure nothing's obviously broken, pump it full of mogas from the gas pumps right there where it taxied in, and get a couple of deputies to block traffic for the departure.


Probably slim, I do know that the Maine Warden Service generally has some AVGAS in drums with handpumps ready to go to support float plane operations.
 
2013-04-27 07:10:03 PM

Miss Nova: pump it full of mogas from the gas pumps right there where it taxied in


How do you taxi when you just deadsticked in?
 
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