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(Huffington Post)   US Ambassador to Aussies: Keep pirating Game Of Thrones and we will cut off your freakin' sword hand   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 360
    More: Dumbass, Ambassador to Aussies, U.S. Ambassador, Jeffrey Bleich, United States, Australians, pirated games, fictional universes, iTunes Store  
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13571 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Apr 2013 at 12:14 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-26 03:04:28 PM  

Harbinger of the Doomed Rat: People ITT: "A lot of people pirate the current season of GoT because HBO has made it difficult to get legally."
You: "Oh, so because HBO isn't catering to your desired delivery model you think everything should be free!?"
People ITT: "Uh, no, that's not what we said at all."
You: "Buying the crown jewels! Cat poop coffee! Club goods! Rivalrous goods! LOOK AT MEEEEE...I WENT TO COLLEGE AND I'M SO SMAAART!"


Actually this whole thing was based on the argument: I was "forced" to obtain game of thrones illegally.  Of course people will do illegal stuff because they don't want to pay for something - if you notice i high-fived a guy for having the balls to just say that. 

As to the rest, fark it man, i like analogies and i figure if we are gonna discuss something, it doesn't hurt to know what we are talking about.  I assume that everyone i am speaking to is smart.  I suppose i could dumb things down but i figure that is much more condescending.  Also, more importantly, i am an obnoxious pedant - it's totally why i am on fark.
 
2013-04-26 03:05:03 PM  

mongbiohazard: Theaetetus: The All-Powerful Atheismo: Theaetetus:

Is The Oatmeal selling the pirated GoT episodes?  Or making money off of them?

No?

Is he distributing them?
Yes?

What?!?

Uhhhh, how exactly does him writing a comic about it being a pain in the ass for him to pay for GOT translate in to him distributing GOT? He wrote a comic about it, not posted a rip of it to his site for his visitors to download for free...


See that torrent screenshot showing his upload rate?

"But that's just a comic!"

Yes, this whole discussion assumes the comic reflects reality. I'm certainly not suggesting HBO should rush off and file suit.
 
2013-04-26 03:06:05 PM  

Teiritzamna: Infernalist: Also, mister Ambassador, here is the President of Programming for HBO, talking about the show you're so valiantly defending from downloaders:

Oh for the love of pete - read above.  I really am not attempting to lodge a valiant defense of Game of Thrones.  I am merely pointing out that the argument that HBO's stupidly expensive and silly distribution shenanigans in no way "forced" anyone to obtain it without payingIt forced them to make the choice not to pay for it.  Obtaining it without paying for it, however, is because the parties in question still wanted it - or as is often implied here, felt they had a right to it.


Well, that's certainly true. That's not entirely the point, however. As another poster pointed out:

mongbiohazard: ...the old guard media companies have made things difficult for many customers like him to pay for the show legally in a timely fashion even if they want to quite a lot, and that is not only incentivising piracy for those people but actually going further and making it the best way for them to consume that media - with or without cash in hand.



Yes, piracy is illegal and it's theft and all that without question. That makes it wrong.
Yes, content providers and distributors, rather than respond to the demands of their target consumers, create an environment that more significantly encourages said target consumers to steal rather than to buy. That makes it stupid.
 
2013-04-26 03:06:40 PM  

suziequzie: But... they bring snacks and beer... so that's cool, right?


Oh wow, so not only are they getting to watch it without paying for it, but you're profiting off of it!  I bet you rebroadcast games without the express written consent of Major League Baseball, too.
 
2013-04-26 03:07:09 PM  

rugman11: Infernalist: rugman11: Infernalist: Rex Kramer - Danger Seeker: Nobody is screwing anyone. If you think the price is too high, then don't buy it!!!! Jesus what a sense of entitlement in this country. Also, the Sansa chapters sucked and the Tyrion chapters ruled. That is all.

Nah, I'll keep on doing what I'm doing, instead of doing without.

When they offer an HBO-Go system where I can buy it direct through the internet, then I'll pay them legitimately.  Until then, screw it.  I'm not paying $65 a month with an extra $20 a month for premium channels for ONE show that only has ten episodes in a six month span.

Or you could, you know, wait.  You're not entitled to Game of Thrones on release day.  Just because you can access something illegally doesn't justify you getting it that way when the provider doesn't bend to your every whim.

Wait for what?  Does waiting a week before downloading it make it better somehow?  lol  'wait!'

There's a cost spectrum when it comes to HBO shows.  You want to watch it live, it'll cost you $255 (three months of cable plus three months of HBO.  If you're willing to wait six weeks, it'll cost you $95 (one month of cable plus one month of HBO).  If you're willing to wait ten months, it'll cost you $30 to stream or $40 for the DVD.  Wait a little longer than that and you can probably borrow it from your library for free.

If you don't want to pay through the nose for "one show that only has ten episodes," all you have to do is wait a little bit and it'll be cheap.  And you'll even be able to "buy it direct through the internet [and] pay them legitimately."

So yes, wait.


I'd rather get it the next day for free.  And at 1080 quality, no less.

When they offer it up for a reasonable price per episode within a few days of airing along the lines of music singles and videos and audio books and movies, then I'll pay for it.  Othewise lol...wait TEN MONTHS lol.  Uh huh.
 
2013-04-26 03:07:38 PM  

Mr Guy: "If the 4 million people who watched 'Game of Thrones' legally had been illegal downloaders - the show would be off the air and there would never have been a season 3," Bleich said.

Except that's not what happened, HBO is more popular than ever, and Game of Thrones is wildly profitable.  So if you focus just on the metric of downloading, and ignore everything else about how business works, that attitude makes sense.  However, if you look at every metric of what "profitable" and "successful" means, downloaders aren't stealing from you, they are people whose price point has not yet been met.  There is zero demand from them at the current price point, and they only exist because your supply curve is fixed with legal constraints, but technology makes it easy to circumvent your supply curve.


Shut up amd stop making sense. This is the Internet.
 
2013-04-26 03:10:09 PM  

BgJonson79: geek_mars: BgJonson79: ha-ha-guy: Teiritzamna: ha-ha-guy: Now you're just playing the idiot. Most people with an IQ above a radish can read the implied context of "had to pirate due to lack of availability via digital distribution channels, unlike the vast majority of other current shows". If you can't, I feel sorry for you.

Translation: i have decided that i want a thing but i do not like the price point/distribution model that it is offered for.  Thus instead of doing without - which heaven forfend i could not possibly do for some reason -  I shall obtain it without paying.  I shall also indicate that this decision to obtain something that i wanted in an extra legal fashion was somehow someone else's fault.  Because damn it i have a right to watch that show the way i want to - its in the constitution or somethin'.

I'm just the invisible hand of the market and you're a troll, such is life.

So if you were a content provider, you'd be okay with people infringing your copyright?

<tl;dr>

I can't say I'd be "ok" with people infringing my copyright, but I would do all I could to discourage it while accepting that I cannot entirely prevent it. I'd focus on making it more widely available and affordable in the hopes of maximizing legitimate purchases.

That's a perfectly honest and valid and even moral answer.  New here? ;-)


Not new, but also not well practiced. I'm joining twitter soon, though, so I can try and learn to make my point in fewer words. Once I've mastered that I'll take up text speek.
 
2013-04-26 03:13:15 PM  

LasersHurt: So I guess your argument of "you're not entitled to it if the owners don't offer you a way to buy it that doesn't suck horribly" sits very poorly with me. How about the content producers make it EASIER to get the content, so people do, money comes in, and everyone is happy?


Ah.  Ok a couple things.  First, from a "lets design a good system" sure, man, i think you are 100% correct.  I thought i was making it very clear i think HBO's system is dumb as hell, and is literally leaving money on the table.

My issue, however is that HBO has the right to leave money on the table.  Like any property owner, they have the right to ask crazy ass prices for their products.  And the consumers have every right to say "screw that."  Is this optimal?  Oh hell no.  And i would much rather what you are advocating, a more reasonable pricing and distribution system.

However, my only argument, really, is that people who see the above interaction and say "HBO made me download it illegally" are making a ridiculous statement.  I see that as being a totally separate issue to whether everyone would be happier if HBO stopped sucking and let people buy the shows ala carte.
 
2013-04-26 03:13:53 PM  

Infernalist: When they offer it up for a reasonable price per episode within a few days of airing along the lines of music singles and videos and audio books and movies, then I'll pay for it. Othewise lol...wait TEN MONTHS lol. Uh huh.


This is the thing I don't understand.  When you look at US content producers, these are billion dollar companies.  Hell, most of them have their own distribution company as part of the overall business.  The idea is that these are intelligent businessmen (and women) who can take the pulse of the public and provide something that most people would want to watch.  And they have the resources to do it.

But, when they're faced with a problem like rampant downloading and the opportunity to make small and probably inexpensive adjustments to their business model, they call the lawyers and start suing individual copyright infringers (or worse, making silly and ineffective anti-piracy ads).  A trillion dollar industry is literally hamstrung by torrents.  Really?
 
2013-04-26 03:14:39 PM  

Teiritzamna: LasersHurt: So I guess your argument of "you're not entitled to it if the owners don't offer you a way to buy it that doesn't suck horribly" sits very poorly with me. How about the content producers make it EASIER to get the content, so people do, money comes in, and everyone is happy?

Ah.  Ok a couple things.  First, from a "lets design a good system" sure, man, i think you are 100% correct.  I thought i was making it very clear i think HBO's system is dumb as hell, and is literally leaving money on the table.

My issue, however is that HBO has the right to leave money on the table.  Like any property owner, they have the right to ask crazy ass prices for their products.  And the consumers have every right to say "screw that."  Is this optimal?  Oh hell no.  And i would much rather what you are advocating, a more reasonable pricing and distribution system.

However, my only argument, really, is that people who see the above interaction and say "HBO made me download it illegally" are making a ridiculous statement.  I see that as being a totally separate issue to whether everyone would be happier if HBO stopped sucking and let people buy the shows ala carte.


I see that mostly as a "Hey HBO, are you paying attention!?" Like a kid acting out - sure, they're not right to do so, but maybe they are calling attention to something important?
 
2013-04-26 03:16:28 PM  

Egalitarian: moothemagiccow: The Stealth Hippopotamus: The show is better than the books. Yeah, I said it.

The show eliminated the purpose of characters like Sansa, Davos and Catelyn, but left them in for no reason. They exist only to show what's happening to other characters. Giving Cersei, Joffrey, Stannis and Robb POV means there's nothing for the aforementioned characters to do, making them more boring than they used to be. Arya and Tyrion are the same, but they're actually interesting.

So now they have to fill Catelyn's mouth with dumb shiat like "I wished Jon Snow was dead, then I swore I'd love him forever and didn't" and pack Sansa's scenes with action like staring at boats. And because of dumb shiat like this, they cut fluff like the Reeds' entire reason for being with Bran, and have to worm their way around it with weird shiat like them attacking his camp.

I've read the books up until middle of the 4th where I stalled out. For the most part the TV version comes off as strongly tightened and I don't mind most of the changes. The producers have made Catelyn and Cersei more sympathetic and more fleshed out. Why not, they have good actresses playing the roles.

GRRM came up with some good stuff but his writing is uneven and some of it is at the level of fanfic. I stalled out because I'm annoyed at all these chapters introducing new people while the pre-existing characters are MIA or doing nothing - it's just flabby. I'm glad David Benioff and Dan Weiss came along and slapped this epic into shape.

One thing I learned from LotR and before that, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, is that anybody can come along and piss all over your fanboy/fangirl dreams, sometimes the creator him/herself. So try not to get too invested in some movie or TV show being exactly what you expect, it will always disappoint you.


That's actually what I like about this series. It's not a basic mystery, where you can see what's coming. After season 2 of the show, I don't expect much from it.

My problem is that it's a poor adaptation riddled with plot holes. It's kind of like the Harry Potter movies, or LotR. If you aren't familiar with the source, you're going to have trouble understanding why one character is doing what they do. If you are familiar with the source, you're going to wonder what the hell's going on.
 
2013-04-26 03:16:29 PM  

Mercutio74: But, when they're faced with a problem like rampant downloading and the opportunity to make small and probably inexpensive adjustments to their business model, they call the lawyers and start suing individual copyright infringers (or worse, making silly and ineffective anti-piracy ads). A trillion dollar industry is literally hamstrung by torrents. Really?


I would say they are stuck in a red queen scenario - they believe that they must continue to drop the hammer because if they dont then they really will get hamstrung by torrents.  I.e. they have seen what happened to porno and are terrified.

I doubt this is really going to happen to them, but it appears to be their thinking.
 
2013-04-26 03:16:42 PM  

AgentBang: Thanks Stealth...sometimes trolls go fishing and sometimes people feel like they need to be hooked.


Wow some people take being proven wrong well, then there is this guy.

I'm betting he has a blood pressure problem, and a few ulcers
 
2013-04-26 03:17:57 PM  

LasersHurt: I see that mostly as a "Hey HBO, are you paying attention!?" Like a kid acting out - sure, they're not right to do so, but maybe they are calling attention to something important?


Except the same message could be sent by not consuming it at all and making the same complaints. It seems more of a cake and eat it kinda thing to me.
 
2013-04-26 03:19:41 PM  

Teiritzamna: I assume that everyone i am speaking to is smart.


No, you're assuming that everyone you're speaking to has the same knowledge base that you do, and there's a world of difference there.  I know a lot about DNS, but it would be presumptuous of me to just assume that everyone else knows what I'm talking about if I start referring to DHCID and NSEC records.  You may think of it as "dumbing things down" but it's better to think of it as "speaking to your target audience."  The number of attorneys in this thread is pretty close to 1, so don't speak like you would to other attorneys since lawyers are outnumbered here.  ;)
 
2013-04-26 03:20:33 PM  

geek_mars: Yes, piracy is illegal and it's theft and all that without question. That makes it wrong.
Yes, content providers and distributors, rather than respond to the demands of their target consumers, create an environment that more significantly encourages said target consumers to steal rather than to buy. That makes it stupid.


But in this particular case, as the article noted, Game of Thrones is available for legal download in Australia on the same day it airs in the United States and, even so, it remains the country that downloads the most.  They have easier access than pretty much any other country, that is, HBO has "create[d] an environment that significantly encourages said target customers" to buy rather than steal, and people still steal.
 
2013-04-26 03:21:01 PM  

Teiritzamna: LasersHurt: I see that mostly as a "Hey HBO, are you paying attention!?" Like a kid acting out - sure, they're not right to do so, but maybe they are calling attention to something important?

Except the same message could be sent by not consuming it at all and making the same complaints. It seems more of a cake and eat it kinda thing to me.


Because they don't care if you complain, or can't pay them. Clearly they don't mind at all if those users don't consume. If they cared, at all, they would make it available.
 
2013-04-26 03:22:30 PM  

Harbinger of the Doomed Rat: Teiritzamna: I assume that everyone i am speaking to is smart.

No, you're assuming that everyone you're speaking to has the same knowledge base that you do, and there's a world of difference there.  I know a lot about DNS, but it would be presumptuous of me to just assume that everyone else knows what I'm talking about if I start referring to DHCID and NSEC records.  You may think of it as "dumbing things down" but it's better to think of it as "speaking to your target audience."  The number of attorneys in this thread is pretty close to 1, so don't speak like you would to other attorneys since lawyers are outnumbered here.  ;)


fair enough - although usually when i hit a thread where people start tossing around actual terms-of-art i just use google and wiki magic.
 
2013-04-26 03:22:56 PM  

geek_mars: Yes, piracy is illegal and it's theft and all that without question. That makes it wrong.
Yes, content providers and distributors, rather than respond to the demands of their target consumers, create an environment that more significantly encourages said target consumers to steal rather than to buy. That makes it stupid.


Didn't we go through this with music already?  HBO needs to stop making such high quality popular shows if they don't want them stolen. Their business model is obviously working for them, because they can still afford to make these shows, regardless of theft. If they think they can make more money streaming it with ads or selling it on itunes, they will.

This diplomat is talking without any prompt from HBO
 
2013-04-26 03:23:29 PM  

Teiritzamna: I.e. they have seen what happened to porno and are terrified.


What has been the overall difference in profitablity for porn pre and post internet?
 
2013-04-26 03:23:46 PM  

Teiritzamna: LasersHurt: I see that mostly as a "Hey HBO, are you paying attention!?" Like a kid acting out - sure, they're not right to do so, but maybe they are calling attention to something important?

Except the same message could be sent by not consuming it at all and making the same complaints. It seems more of a cake and eat it kinda thing to me.


That same message had been given since the birth of the premium cable system.  The cable providers didn't care.  They ignored that message of 'hey give us what we want!'.  They straight up ignored it or said 'screw you, pay us what we want or do without'.

The only thing that's changed is that the internet and torrenting has completely invalidated their ability to keep control over their content.  So, now that they can't ignore the message any longer, or just say 'screw up guys', they have to either continue their futile protesting or GIVE US WHAT WE'VE WANTED FROM THE BEGINNING.

The only thing that's kept them from providing a 'per episode' sales approach is pure unadulterated greed.   It's not enough to be profitable, not for them.  They have to squeeze out every last dollar that they can through the current system of 'a few gems mixed into a metric ton of shiat'.
 
2013-04-26 03:25:44 PM  

rugman11: But in this particular case, as the article noted, Game of Thrones is available for legal download in Australia on the same day it airs in the United States


Actually the article doesn't say that.  It says that Australians only have to wait a few hours to access the episodes by "legitimate means", but it fails to specify what those means are.  If they're the same as they are in the US, i.e., you have to have a subscription to HBO, they're facing the same situation that people in the US are facing who want to watch it, but don't have HBO.
 
2013-04-26 03:26:11 PM  

moothemagiccow: So now they have to fill Catelyn's mouth with dumb shiat like "I wished Jon Snow was dead, then I swore I'd love him forever and didn't" and pack Sansa's scenes with action like staring at boats. And because of dumb shiat like this, they cut fluff like the Reeds' entire reason for being with Bran, and have to worm their way around it with weird shiat like them attacking his camp.


Nothing can be as bad as the internal monologue that Sansa has with herself. Sansa on TV is a person that we can empathize with and can care about. I swear I was hoping for her bloody death though most of the books.

And I like that books a lot. I just love the show.

Wish they let her:
img705.imageshack.us

Keep her original hair color. Darker hair is hotter. It is known.
 
2013-04-26 03:27:19 PM  

Mercutio74: Teiritzamna: I.e. they have seen what happened to porno and are terrified.

What has been the overall difference in profitablity for porn pre and post internet?


I can speak to that.  I used to work for a number of years in a porn/smoke shop in the early 1990s.

Most 'quality' vids from known studios went for $40-80 bucks each.  Low quality stuff, or amateur stuff went for $20 to 30 bucks.  Mags went for $20 for 4packs up to $15 PER mag for hardcore stuff.

These days...well...the porn industry is nearly dead.  The combination of torrenting, porn-for-free clearinghouse websites and the HIV scare in the last couple of years has just about destroyed the entire business.
 
2013-04-26 03:27:52 PM  

moothemagiccow: thornhill: If you suddenly have access to all episodes of HBO shows, why would you ever buy them on home video?

Why would you buy a movie when you can rent it whenever you want? Because renting it isn't owning it.


Consumer habits say otherwise. Sales and rentals of physical media are down because of streaming.
 
2013-04-26 03:28:47 PM  

Mercutio74: What has been the overall difference in profitablity for porn pre and post internet?


My understanding is that the piracy has basically cratered the big pron industry, and what has risen instaed is much cheaper gonzo or amateur outfits with much much lower production values (i.e. less money in as there is less money out.) As a consumer we can easily argue whether this is good or bad, but for the old guard bigger pron businesses, the last decade has been a shiatshow.

As I said, this is just my understanding - i alas, lack graphs or anything - but i can see how other media would fear this result, even though i really doubt it would affect anything else (as the big driver in porn downloads is the shame factor, not just the price)
 
2013-04-26 03:29:11 PM  

Infernalist: Mercutio74: Teiritzamna: I.e. they have seen what happened to porno and are terrified.

What has been the overall difference in profitablity for porn pre and post internet?

I can speak to that.  I used to work for a number of years in a porn/smoke shop in the early 1990s.

Most 'quality' vids from known studios went for $40-80 bucks each.  Low quality stuff, or amateur stuff went for $20 to 30 bucks.  Mags went for $20 for 4packs up to $15 PER mag for hardcore stuff.

These days...well...the porn industry is nearly dead.  The combination of torrenting, porn-for-free clearinghouse websites and the HIV scare in the last couple of years has just about destroyed the entire business.


Thanks for that.  It's difficult to find numbers.
 
2013-04-26 03:29:22 PM  

thornhill: moothemagiccow: thornhill: If you suddenly have access to all episodes of HBO shows, why would you ever buy them on home video?

Why would you buy a movie when you can rent it whenever you want? Because renting it isn't owning it.

Consumer habits say otherwise. Sales and rentals of physical media are down because of streaming.


Michael Lombardo has point blank stated that downloading hasn't touched their DVD sales.  It's why he's not all that worked up over it.
 
2013-04-26 03:29:23 PM  

thornhill: moothemagiccow: thornhill: If you suddenly have access to all episodes of HBO shows, why would you ever buy them on home video?

Why would you buy a movie when you can rent it whenever you want? Because renting it isn't owning it.

Consumer habits say otherwise. Sales and rentals of physical media are down because of streaming.


Jesus they aren't mutually exclusive. There are plenty of reasons to want to have physical media even if you have the ability to stream it.
 
2013-04-26 03:29:35 PM  

Obiwontaun: Malacon: Igor Jakovsky: there really is no need to dl it with torrents if you can just stream it for free about an hour after the broadcast. Or you could do what i did and call up comcast and biatch about the rates and they may not only lower your rate but give you more channels and hbo for free. i called them and threatened to go to uverse. they knocked $25 a month off my bill gave me their upper tier package with hbo for free. if they are doing things like that they must actually feel threatened by uverse or people cutting off the cable in general. if they had not helped me out i would have done one or the other.

I biatched about my rates a while ago, and they kinda hinted they'd give me HBO but I was trying to bring my bill down, so I told them no. Kind of regret it, honestly. I probably gain anything in cash off by turning down HBO.

A friend just lets me borrow his HBOGO password, so I watch it the next day.

FYI it's available on there as soon as its done airing. I do the same thing.


For season 3 it's been available at the same time. I watch it on Go when everyone else watches it on the actual channel.
 
2013-04-26 03:30:06 PM  

Mercutio74: Teiritzamna: I.e. they have seen what happened to porno and are terrified.

What has been the overall difference in profitablity for porn pre and post internet?


Well if the porn distro companies are to be believed, the Internet is destroying their profitability via piracy.  I think they're (potentially deliberately) ignoring the impact of amateur porn.  Yes, porn gets pirated like crazy, but people filming their own farking and posting it online is booming and is also taking a chunk of the porn pie that the studios aren't seeing a dime from.
 
2013-04-26 03:32:19 PM  

thornhill: moothemagiccow: thornhill: If you suddenly have access to all episodes of HBO shows, why would you ever buy them on home video?

Why would you buy a movie when you can rent it whenever you want? Because renting it isn't owning it.

Consumer habits say otherwise. Sales and rentals of physical media are down because of streaming.


I have bought only a half dozen CDs in the past several years since Pandora became available, down from well over a thousand in my collection from the 1990s-early 2000s. I listen to much more music now, too.
 
2013-04-26 03:35:43 PM  

Teiritzamna: y understanding is that the piracy has basically cratered the big pron industry, and what has risen instaed is much cheaper gonzo or amateur outfits with much much lower production values (i.e. less money in as there is less money out.) As a consumer we can easily argue whether this is good or bad, but for the old guard bigger pron businesses, the last decade has been a shiatshow.


I would argue that's less likely to happen in television and film making.  The thing about porn is at the center of it, there's just farking.  I don't have a lot of trouble thinking about how all of the bright shiny sets and complex lighting and stirring performances and visual effects could all be simply dropped out of it and you're left with...  farking.  Which was the point of it.

The public's taste for narrative drama however does demand a lot of those things.  If you neglect too much production value, no one wants to watch.  Some productions demand a sense of scope, like GoT for example.

I mean, look at yearly box offices for feature films... they're still going up.  If porn and "mainstream" entertainment had that much in common, we should at least see a modest decline in box office takes, but they're actually quite healthy.
 
2013-04-26 03:37:31 PM  

Theaetetus: I have bought only a half dozen CDs in the past several years since Pandora became available


Heh, Pandora is pretty much the only time I trick the internet into thinking I'm in the US...  it's kinda awesome and has introduced me to all kinds of bands and performers I'd never have known about.
 
2013-04-26 03:40:25 PM  

Theaetetus: See that torrent screenshot showing his upload rate?

"But that's just a comic!"

Yes, this whole discussion assumes the comic reflects reality. I'm certainly not suggesting HBO should rush off and file suit.



See the screenshot of http://www.bigtimeawesometorrentbucket.com/ ? That's not a real site. The Oatmeal makes webcomics, not documentaries.

None of your arguments are making any sense in this thread, which is very out of character for you. You didn't share your login information with tenpoundsofcheese today, did you?  ;)
 
2013-04-26 03:41:21 PM  

itazurakko: Teiritzamna: I am merely pointing out that the argument that HBO's stupidly expensive and silly distribution shenanigans in no way "forced" anyone to obtain it without paying.

People are criticizing HBO (and similar companies) for turning down easy money.

The important difference with the sports car is that sports cars are hard to steal.  Movies are pretty trivially easy to pirate. Like it or not, that definitely affects the market price of an item.  The music industry figured this out already.


I criticize them for not being more price sensitive. The reality is that 35 bucks for one season of one show is an unrealistic market price... if they set it at 10 or 15 bucks, they'd have far more takers.  Just like with video gamers who pirate because shelling out 60 bucks for a game is unreasonable when the market is absolutely flooded with bad titles with massive bugs or playability issues... I fault the end users to some extent, but from the econ side of things where I live, I see this as a pretty easily fixable problems if people focused on market-based solutions instead of trying to get the government to do something unrealistic (stop piracy) so they can enhance information asymmetry about the quality of the product and charge above-market values.
 
2013-04-26 03:41:30 PM  

Teufelaffe: rugman11: But in this particular case, as the article noted, Game of Thrones is available for legal download in Australia on the same day it airs in the United States

Actually the article doesn't say that.  It says that Australians only have to wait a few hours to access the episodes by "legitimate means", but it fails to specify what those means are.  If they're the same as they are in the US, i.e., you have to have a subscription to HBO, they're facing the same situation that people in the US are facing who want to watch it, but don't have HBO.


You're right.  I misread the article, apparently HBO is a cable channel in Australia
 
2013-04-26 03:42:36 PM  

I_C_Weener: Dude!  Spoilers!

Also, I view Australia kind of like he wildlings north of the wall...lawless.


The book is years old. The spoilers statute of limitations is long expired.
 
2013-04-26 03:44:29 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Wish they let her:
[img705.imageshack.us image 635x500]

Keep her original hair color. Darker hair is hotter. It is known.


Agreed. She's hotter as a brunette. Still hot as a blond though... Too bad she's the worst actress/actor on the show. Still like her character and enjoy her arc though.
 
2013-04-26 03:44:36 PM  
This seems like a good place to ask.

I've watched all episodes of GoT. I've bought the first book and I'm about 1/3 of the way through it. It seems the book and show are pretty damn similar.

Could I just skip ahead and start reading book 3, or is there enough difference that it would be better to read book 2?
 
2013-04-26 03:44:38 PM  

Brittabot: I refuse to pay close to $25 a month for a movie package just so I can watch one channel one hour a week.

That said, I'd be more than willing to pay per episode or per season if I could download the show the same night it plays on television.

Since I can't do that, my only other option is to use less than legal means to get the show.

/Canadian


Exactly this.

HBO could be making a massive killing if they just charged 5 bucks per episode, available to download without DRM when it airs. People would absolutely pay for that, and HBO would get 50 bucks for the season, which is right on par with a Blu-Ray/DVD set.

But no, they keep trying to wrangle everyone into buying the rest of their stuff, which pretty much NO ONE cares about.
 
2013-04-26 03:46:47 PM  

firefly212: itazurakko: Teiritzamna: I am merely pointing out that the argument that HBO's stupidly expensive and silly distribution shenanigans in no way "forced" anyone to obtain it without paying.

People are criticizing HBO (and similar companies) for turning down easy money.

The important difference with the sports car is that sports cars are hard to steal.  Movies are pretty trivially easy to pirate. Like it or not, that definitely affects the market price of an item.  The music industry figured this out already.

I criticize them for not being more price sensitive. The reality is that 35 bucks for one season of one show is an unrealistic market price... if they set it at 10 or 15 bucks, they'd have far more takers.  Just like with video gamers who pirate because shelling out 60 bucks for a game is unreasonable when the market is absolutely flooded with bad titles with massive bugs or playability issues... I fault the end users to some extent, but from the econ side of things where I live, I see this as a pretty easily fixable problems if people focused on market-based solutions instead of trying to get the government to do something unrealistic (stop piracy) so they can enhance information asymmetry about the quality of the product and charge above-market values.


But this is America; you always blame the person at the end of the line and then punish them.  Fixing or adjusting what might lead to or exacerbate the problem is unacceptable.
 
2013-04-26 03:48:11 PM  

mongbiohazard: Theaetetus: See that torrent screenshot showing his upload rate?

"But that's just a comic!"

Yes, this whole discussion assumes the comic reflects reality. I'm certainly not suggesting HBO should rush off and file suit.


See the screenshot of http://www.bigtimeawesometorrentbucket.com/ ? That's not a real site. The Oatmeal makes webcomics, not documentaries.


See the screenshot of Transmission.app? That's a real app. The Oatmeal makes webcomics, not fake applications.
 
2013-04-26 03:48:39 PM  

impaler: This seems like a good place to ask.

I've watched all episodes of GoT. I've bought the first book and I'm about 1/3 of the way through it. It seems the book and show are pretty damn similar.

Could I just skip ahead and start reading book 3, or is there enough difference that it would be better to read book 2?


The first couple books are the best, read them and enjoy them.  However by all means feel free to skip chapters of characters you don't like.

Spoiler: Starting with Feast, Book 4, the writing gets bad.  

/when I reread the books I just reflexively skipped the Sansa chapters and half the Arya ones
 
2013-04-26 03:49:11 PM  

I created this alt just for this thread: But this is America; you always blame the person at the end of the line and then punish them. Fixing or adjusting what might lead to or exacerbate the problem is unacceptable.


No. In America, half of us blame the big bad companies, the other half blames those damn freeloaders, and nothing actually gets fixed.
 
2013-04-26 03:49:23 PM  

impaler: This seems like a good place to ask.

I've watched all episodes of GoT. I've bought the first book and I'm about 1/3 of the way through it. It seems the book and show are pretty damn similar.

Could I just skip ahead and start reading book 3, or is there enough difference that it would be better to read book 2?


If you're interested in the story and the GOT "universe" I would strongly suggest reading the books. The show combines quite a few characters and omits a lot of background information. If you're not into all of that, then you're not really missing much by skipping to book 3. Bear in mind there will be some differences and you'll be confused by something that are completely different, yet ultimately not meaningful to forwarding the plot.
 
2013-04-26 03:49:24 PM  

firefly212: Just like with video gamers who pirate because shelling out 60 bucks for a game is unreasonable when the market is absolutely flooded with bad titles with massive bugs or playability issues...


If the titles are so bad with massive bugs and playability issues, then why are they bothering to pirate them?
 
2013-04-26 03:50:18 PM  

Teiritzamna: Mercutio74: But, when they're faced with a problem like rampant downloading and the opportunity to make small and probably inexpensive adjustments to their business model, they call the lawyers and start suing individual copyright infringers (or worse, making silly and ineffective anti-piracy ads). A trillion dollar industry is literally hamstrung by torrents. Really?

I would say they are stuck in a red queen scenario - they believe that they must continue to drop the hammer because if they dont then they really will get hamstrung by torrents.  I.e. they have seen what happened to porno and are terrified.

I doubt this is really going to happen to them, but it appears to be their thinking.


I think they're more terrified about what happened to the music industry.  Like television, the music industry was based on bundling (albums) and the vast majority of the industry profits came from bundling (more than 90% of profits came from album sales).  When the industry capitulated to pirates and started putting there product online through iTunes and other outlets, album sales plummeted because people stopped buying the bundle and started buying the singles.  The old music industry was killed because they couldn't just change the model for pirates, they had to change the model for everybody.

Now, the music industry obviously isn't entirely dead, but what's important to remember is that making and distributing a song is far cheaper than making and distributing a television show.  Artists can make it on their own under the new model in a way they couldn't before.  Some no-name Korean artist writes a weird but catchy song, sticks the video on YouTube for nothing and makes $10 million.  You can't do that with television.  It's expensive, and bundling shows together (and networks together) helps to offset the risk inherent to the business.  Television is not an industry that can survive unbundled.
 
2013-04-26 03:51:26 PM  

thornhill: moothemagiccow: thornhill: If you suddenly have access to all episodes of HBO shows, why would you ever buy them on home video?

Why would you buy a movie when you can rent it whenever you want? Because renting it isn't owning it.

Consumer habits say otherwise. Sales and rentals of physical media are down because of streaming.


The only figure I see is a projected decline for 2016. I also see vudu, a digital rental service, lumped in with netflix, a catalog subscription service. I won't deny that blu-ray isn't selling well, because no one owns a blu-ray player, blu-ray movies have an MSRP of $40, and retail selections are inherently limited.

I get that subscription services are more alluring, but you lose access the second you stop paying, and most people understand that difference. Convenience of streaming may be hurting physical media, but I doubt it's crippling digital sales.
 
2013-04-26 03:51:28 PM  

Theaetetus: mongbiohazard: Theaetetus: See that torrent screenshot showing his upload rate?

"But that's just a comic!"

Yes, this whole discussion assumes the comic reflects reality. I'm certainly not suggesting HBO should rush off and file suit.


See the screenshot of http://www.bigtimeawesometorrentbucket.com/ ? That's not a real site. The Oatmeal makes webcomics, not documentaries.

See the screenshot of Transmission.app? That's a real app. The Oatmeal makes webcomics, not fake applications.


Yes because it's easier and more convenient to photoshop an existing screenshot with minor modifications than it is to create one from scratch.

/you know, work smarter not harder
 
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