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(LA Times)   Is $300 really worth it just for "front of line" privileges at your local amusement park?   (latimes.com) divider line 24
    More: Unlikely, VIP, SeaWorld San Diego, trade groups, Chris Hansen, privileges, back lot, Universal Studios Hollywood, standing in line  
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8226 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Apr 2013 at 7:57 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-26 12:52:47 AM
5 votes:
I would gladly pay $300 to have the following people perma-banned from any public setting:

1.  People who congregate in groups in the MIDDLE of a farking walkway, full-well knowing they are blocking traffic.

2.  People who STOP AT THE TOP of a farking escalator, staring off in to space, oblivious to the fact that there are uncontrolled masses of people behind them that can't reverse course.

3.  People who, after standing in line for 15 minutes at a concession stand, with all that time available to review the menus posted every 6 inches, get to the front of the line and then take 10 more minutes to figure out what the fark they want to order.

4.  People who have no contextual awareness of their surroundings, and wander aimlessly, 2 feet in front of you, stopping randomly every 3 feet, and somehow managing to anticipate your every evasive move to get around their stupid farking asses...

/end of rant.
2013-04-26 08:30:40 AM
3 votes:
Has anyone considered the possibility that there are just too damned many people in the park?

www.latimes.com

These parks were designed when there were about half as many people living in the US and getting to the park presented an almost insurmountable barrier to most of them.
2013-04-26 06:14:31 AM
3 votes:

markie_farkie: I would gladly pay $300 to have the following people perma-banned from any public setting:

1.  People who congregate in groups in the MIDDLE of a farking walkway, full-well knowing they are blocking traffic.

2.  People who STOP AT THE TOP of a farking escalator, staring off in to space, oblivious to the fact that there are uncontrolled masses of people behind them that can't reverse course.

3.  People who, after standing in line for 15 minutes at a concession stand, with all that time available to review the menus posted every 6 inches, get to the front of the line and then take 10 more minutes to figure out what the fark they want to order.

4.  People who have no contextual awareness of their surroundings, and wander aimlessly, 2 feet in front of you, stopping randomly every 3 feet, and somehow managing to anticipate your every evasive move to get around their stupid farking asses...


5. People who walk through crowds while texting/surfing/playing on their phones, never bothering to look up and forcing people to dodge them or be trampled.

6. People who wear large backpacks and have no concept of how this affects their girth and who turn quickly, without looking who will be smashed in the face by their Quasimodoesque protrusion.
2013-04-26 10:02:56 AM
2 votes:

ChaoticLimbs: If the park does this, I don't go. This is because when they pay the park this extra thing, the park is selling my place in line, which I paid for, without compensating me for the fact that I have to wait. Selling cuts is NOT cool.

It's one thing for the rich to be able to pay for things I can't- and quite another for them to be able to take from me without my permission based on their wealth.


I generally feel the same way.

When a park sells special tours or access to hidden areas - that's cool. They are selling something extra that requires additional resources (special tour guide and adjustments to security). Selling 'cuts' in line is essentially selling something that doesn't belong to them. They are literally selling the inconvenience of their less valued customers. Other examples might be:

Revoking a reservation at a booked hotel because someone agreed to pay more
Bumping you from a reserved/confirmed flight because somebody bought your seat for a fee

Nobody has a problem with people with money getting the first class treatment. The problem is when the treatment takes away from the experience that you are also paying for.
2013-04-26 08:36:16 AM
2 votes:

markie_farkie: People who have no contextual awareness of their surroundings, and wander aimlessly, 2 feet in front of you, stopping randomly every 3 feet, and somehow managing to anticipate your every evasive move to get around their stupid farking asses...


My wife and I call these people Meanderthals.
2013-04-26 08:19:28 AM
2 votes:
This is one of the early signs of America's two-tier future. Rich? Allow me to kiss your ass. Not? Shut up and wait, nobody cares, prole.

I don't question a park's right to do this kind of thing, but it extra-guarantees I would never go. I'm more in the top tier than the bottom (not rich but fairly well off) and I hate this kind of thing. But then I hate huge, crowded, e. coli-producing theme parks.

You can find me at the local minor league baseball park on a sunny afternoon, enjoying the hell out of life. $10 for a ticket, parking is free, and the crowd is families instead of the rabid screaming drunks at big league games. When people pay a lot, they feel entitled to be jerks.
2013-04-26 08:10:46 AM
2 votes:
Universal's not worth the normal $80/day ticket price, much less the $300 VIP package.
2013-04-26 12:36:13 AM
2 votes:

doglover: YES!

Assume my time is worth $25 dollars an hour, thus every hour I'm waiting in line is -$25.
The average wait in Tokyo Disney is 2 hours in the summer.

This means that a full day at Disneyland in the busy season each 2 hour line costs me about $50 in lost productivity just waiting to get to ther ride.

Now, let's talk utility. I'd pay $25 to do something fun for two hours that's not waiting in line. Be it a movie, a bar tab, or a few rounds of bowling. So the 2 hour line is costing me an aditional $50 in lost utility.

So each two hour line costs me $100 in loss to wait for. Thus if I ride three rides(or skip six hours' waiting) in a day, the fast past pays for itself. So if you hit many rides, totally worth it.


Great..

You're the reason that marketing assholes think they can get away with 400% surcharges on concert tickets, and ON TOP OF THAT, charge $50 for "email delivery and convenience" fees..
2013-04-26 12:19:41 AM
2 votes:
It isn't $300, it's $219 more than you'd normally pay.

And it's probably an awesome deal for couples without kids to pay for.
2013-04-26 10:54:09 AM
1 votes:
hmm...

The only line that comes to mind that would be worth paying $300 to be at the front of would have to be the line for a train...

...if you're into that sort of thing.
2013-04-26 10:46:30 AM
1 votes:
not that amusement parks should expected to be the barometers of social equality, but i find it fitting that class privilege extends even there.  invariably, if you're being shuttled to the front of the line, you're putting other people out.  been waiting for 2 hours?  wait 3, because the Rockefellers just got here and they all want to go on this ride.  imagine if we prioritized healthcare and education and basic rights based on one's access to money.  oh...

can't wait to see this morally bankrupt, inefficient, needlessly competitive joke of a social system break down for good.
2013-04-26 10:45:36 AM
1 votes:

groppet: Nope. It sucks wait in line ya lazy farks.
I hate being around lots  of people when they are crammed into parks ahole to bellybutton, so I learned just go on the off season or during a weekday. We took a Disney trip in the 90s and the lines there seemed to move pretty quick, dunno if that is the case anymore.


Disney INVENTED the fast moving line. They can get people on/off rides faster than anyone and they entertain them while they wait. There are big screens for patrons to play video games while they wait in line at Space Mountain now. The reason there are long waits is because the lines are so long. That's why you time your visit the best you can.
2013-04-26 09:41:21 AM
1 votes:
Last year when my youngest kid turned 10 we took a trip out to L.A. to finish up his SCUBA certification over on Catalina, where I had finished his brother's certification the year before.  After the dive trip we gave them the option of Universal / Disney,etc or go sightseeing.  We ended up hiking up to view the Hollywood sign, people watching on Venice Beach, went to 3rd. St. Prominade to people watch some more and then did the pier afterwards.  They've got memories of LA that will last a lifetime, whereas most kids won't remember a thing about a visit to a theme park other than how cranky mom and dad were at the end of the day.  For farks sake - take your kids and do something meaningful.  If, as a family of four, I had budgeted $1200 to blow for a day of fun, it sure as fark wouldn't be spent with 10,000 other people.
2013-04-26 09:31:33 AM
1 votes:
If the park does this, I don't go. This is because when they pay the park this extra thing, the park is selling my place in line, which I paid for, without compensating me for the fact that I have to wait. Selling cuts is NOT cool.

It's one thing for the rich to be able to pay for things I can't- and quite another for them to be able to take from me without my permission based on their wealth.
2013-04-26 09:14:06 AM
1 votes:
No one goes there anymore; it's too crowded.
2013-04-26 09:11:50 AM
1 votes:
You can go the scumbag route and put someone in your group in a wheelchair. Everyone gets to skip the lines that way.
2013-04-26 09:11:29 AM
1 votes:
Staying on site at a Universal Hotel in Orlando, especially during off peak when prices get more reasonable, is worth every penny.

Family of 5 - 3 great pools... all get fast passes to 95% of the rides / attractions... come and go as you please from the parks and walk back to your hotel.. go off site for food.. come back.

Sounds like a commercial?  Probably.  But this is the one thing my entire family agrees on and we look forward to going every year.   Cut out a handful of other amenities during the year.. no biggie.  It's more expensive than staying at the Ramada and getting to ride only about 20% of the rides we currently do but, if I'm only going to have one vacation a year, I'm doing it right. And no.. I don't feel guilty that I can budget throughout the year to make my family's vacation memorable..
2013-04-26 09:08:34 AM
1 votes:

farkeruk: "Productive" ain't exactly the right word. Queueing up for rides isn't nourishing your soul or giving you pleasure or feeding your bank balance. It is wasting time.


I agree.  My main point is comparing what you are doing away from work with what you could be earning is farking stupid.  Do you do that with sleeping?  How much money are you losing when you do crap like sleep, shower and shave?  Do you time how long it takes to pinch a loaf and then wonder if you need more fiber because it 'costs' too much?

I knew a guy that was part of our lunch group for a while that would biatch about this when service was slow.  About how much money he could be making and crap like that.  Finally we asked him if his time was so farking valuable, why was he not eating at his desk instead of going out for a lunch?  He decided to no longer be part of our lunch group for some reason.

I get the point the point of convenience.  I get the point that you have a limited amount of time on vacation and many feel the need to do it all.  I've no problem with the passes.  I just think it is stupid to compare time on vacation that you view as wasted as a missed  earning opportunity cost.  If that is your worldview, you should never go on vacation or take any leisure activity, as isn't all just missed earning opportunity?
2013-04-26 08:32:43 AM
1 votes:
Some friends and I invented the line-pass comp at the NYNY casino in Vegas.  The pit boss hand-wrote it the first time.  When we visited next year, it was on a pre-printed form.
2013-04-26 08:27:21 AM
1 votes:
I'd pay 300 just to know that the peons paying 80 are paying that only to see me ride.
2013-04-26 08:21:08 AM
1 votes:

Sid_6.7: It isn't $300, it's $219 more than you'd normally pay.

And it's probably an awesome deal for couples without kids to pay for.


If you are a childless couple, just go during the off season in late September. No lines at all.
2013-04-26 08:15:47 AM
1 votes:

miss diminutive: kingdd: I'm actually in line at the DMV right now. I'd pay $150 just to get to the front if this line.



Brace yourself for a long ride, it's a weekday.


You know you're screwed when the line wraps around the building before the doors even open. This place is just a lake of fire away from being actual hell on earth.
2013-04-26 07:53:23 AM
1 votes:
During a honeymoon trip to Los Angeles, Chris Hansen and his new wife, Shoni, decided not to skimp on their visit to Universal Studios Hollywood

I wonder how young she is...
www.kzoz.com
2013-04-26 12:32:45 AM
1 votes:
YES!

Assume my time is worth $25 dollars an hour, thus every hour I'm waiting in line is -$25.
The average wait in Tokyo Disney is 2 hours in the summer.

This means that a full day at Disneyland in the busy season each 2 hour line costs me about $50 in lost productivity just waiting to get to ther ride.

Now, let's talk utility. I'd pay $25 to do something fun for two hours that's not waiting in line. Be it a movie, a bar tab, or a few rounds of bowling. So the 2 hour line is costing me an aditional $50 in lost utility.

So each two hour line costs me $100 in loss to wait for. Thus if I ride three rides(or skip six hours' waiting) in a day, the fast past pays for itself. So if you hit many rides, totally worth it.
 
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