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(WWSB ABC 7)   Plastic surgeon's office manager performed medical procedure because she had seen it done "plenty of times"   (mysuncoast.com) divider line 66
    More: Florida, medical procedures, office manager  
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10682 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Apr 2013 at 12:53 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-26 12:14:43 AM
Someone was a Holiday Inn Express guest for a night.....
 
2013-04-26 12:55:10 AM

Apos: Someone was a Holiday Inn Express guest for a night.....


Heh. I was going to say at least she wasn't injecting caulk into someone's ass in a hotel room.
 
2013-04-26 12:56:12 AM
She should really stop making that face before it gets stuck that way.
 
2013-04-26 12:56:19 AM
Seems like a reasonable "executive decision".  She made a tough call.
 
2013-04-26 12:56:21 AM
If you walk into a plastic surgeon's office and this is what greets you, you turn around and leave.  Immediately.

bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com
 
2013-04-26 12:56:23 AM

Apos: Someone was a Holiday Inn Express guest for a night.....



Thank You
 
2013-04-26 12:59:11 AM
How was she not charged with practicing ugly with out a license?
 
2013-04-26 12:59:12 AM
Was the patient hurt by the procedure, or is she just setting up grounds for a malpractice lawsuit?  If the patient came in in excruciating pain, and left feeling better with no harm from the treatment, it seems like Ms. Patterson is guilty of poor judgment, and probably deserves some sort of reprimand at work and a fine, but jail seems excessive.
 
2013-04-26 12:59:17 AM
Welcome to Obamacare.
Just getting that out of the way.
 
2013-04-26 01:01:59 AM
I saw the first part where it says she examined a patient and re wrapped the bandages and thought thats not a good idea but arresting her for that?? then I came to the whole inserting a drain thing umm yea thats a major no no. What thought process kicks in and makes someone think gee this is a great thing to do in a clinical setting?
 
2013-04-26 01:02:18 AM
I bet her level of competence wasn't as far below the "doctor's" as you would like to think.

/Fla.
 
2013-04-26 01:02:39 AM

fusillade762: Apos: Someone was a Holiday Inn Express guest for a night.....

Heh. I was going to say at least she wasn't injecting caulk into someone's ass in a hotel room.


That's a crime? I better call my lawyer.

/oh caulk. nevermind.
 
2013-04-26 01:03:41 AM
What could possibly go wrong?
images.zap2it.com
 
2013-04-26 01:04:44 AM

farkingismybusiness: fusillade762: Apos: Someone was a Holiday Inn Express guest for a night.....

Heh. I was going to say at least she wasn't injecting caulk into someone's ass in a hotel room.

That's a crime? I better call my lawyer.

/oh caulk. nevermind.


Heh heheh
 
2013-04-26 01:04:55 AM
farm3.staticflickr.com
 
2013-04-26 01:07:05 AM
"You are rubber, I am glue, whatever sticks on me, I've taken out of you!"
 
2013-04-26 01:07:38 AM
Another thought, why was the office even open if the doctor was out and there was no one there capable of performing medical procedures legally?  Or were there other doctors/nurses available there and she just decided to give it a go herself?  How did the police hear about this?  There's a note about a witness in the office, but did that witness tip them off, or was it the patient and the witness just gave a statement when asked?  There are a lot of unanswered questions here.
 
2013-04-26 01:07:48 AM
i.telegraph.co.uk
/hot one wing fowl
 
2013-04-26 01:11:06 AM
Back in the day we used to call this sort of thing "apprenticeship".

/apparently no one can learn to do something by watching someone anymore and being supervised by that person during actual work.
//they need to spend tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars to be given a certificate that says they understand the theory of how other people have done it.
 
2013-04-26 01:11:34 AM
shiat, gimme an exacto knife and some silly putty and i can make you look like brigitte bardot. when she was old.
 
2013-04-26 01:11:51 AM

Torion!: [i.telegraph.co.uk image 620x475]
/hot one wing  fowl foul

FTFM

 
2013-04-26 01:14:06 AM

Pribar: I saw the first part where it says she examined a patient and re wrapped the bandages and thought thats not a good idea but arresting her for that?? then I came to the whole inserting a drain thing umm yea thats a major no no. What thought process kicks in and makes someone think gee this is a great thing to do in a clinical setting?


She probably did it exactly the way the doctor would've though.  The patient then learned afterwards that there was potential for a suit because of the lack of a license and then went for it.
Which brings me to my soapbox.  All of these jobs requiring licenses.  Starting with say... engineers.  The one's that are already part of the club make the licensing tests and requirements.  Obviously there's always a threat of field oversaturation, so each test and requirement gets harder and harder.  This keeps the Old Boys more marketable. This is the way it has always been.
Now, take that same scenario and apply it beauticians.  Cutting hair and painting nails...  The ones in the club keep making it more and more difficult for a young person to enter the trade.  Keep down market saturation.  It's gotten to ridiculous proportions.  Cosmetology students need like 1800 whopping hours now. 1800 to cut hair?  You only need like 60 hours to operate a plane for farks sake.
 
2013-04-26 01:14:07 AM
Yet another person who is "basically a doctor" in their own mind who has now gotten herself and her employer (who happens to be her brother... ouch) in trouble...
 
2013-04-26 01:15:40 AM

pheelix: If you walk into a plastic surgeon's office and this is what greets you, you turn around and leave.  Immediately.

[bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com image 720x486]


Seriously. She looks like she must have given herself a face lift. She's probably seen that done a bunch of times, too.
 
2013-04-26 01:17:27 AM
Well, sounds like someones about to win themselves a medical practice.
 
2013-04-26 01:19:29 AM
Ahh, I see the "Scary" tag is hiding in the corner.
 
2013-04-26 01:20:10 AM

cuzsis: Back in the day we used to call this sort of thing "apprenticeship".

/apparently no one can learn to do something by watching someone anymore and being supervised by that person during actual work.
//they need to spend tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars to be given a certificate that says they understand the theory of how other people have done it.


i've read of pro photographers that get fed up with assistants that think they know it all after a few months. if this lady wielded a scalpel to make an incision that is a few notches up from suggesting a shutter speed.

-- there was a good episode of Law & Order in which lady surgeon lost her touch but her experienced layman assistant had gifted hands. she had him doing corrective surgeries galore and all was well until Jack McCord got involved. he wanted justice!
 
2013-04-26 01:22:11 AM
bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com
slurmed.com
us.123rf.com
 
2013-04-26 02:15:02 AM

cuzsis: Back in the day we used to call this sort of thing "apprenticeship".

/apparently no one can learn to do something by watching someone anymore and being supervised by that person during actual work.
//they need to spend tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars to be given a certificate that says they understand the theory of how other people have done it.


What you are describing is not even remotely like what happened.
 
2013-04-26 02:17:52 AM
Because seeing something done plenty of times is totally the same thing as having done it plenty of times in a controlled setting.  Right.
 
2013-04-26 02:27:57 AM
Lesson to be learned: never hire your family as employees.
 
2013-04-26 02:55:05 AM

Omahawg: shiat, gimme an exacto knife and some silly putty and i can make you look like brigitte bardot. when she was old.


Ya know I love ya and might actually do things with ya, let you do things to me but if they include an exacto knife and some silly putty, well I'm out.
/Just sayin'
 
2013-04-26 02:59:23 AM

KrispyKritter: -- there was a good episode of Law & Order in which lady surgeon lost her touch but her experienced layman assistant had gifted hands. she had him doing corrective surgeries galore and all was well until Jack McCord

y got involved. he wanted justice!

Fixt.
 
2013-04-26 03:10:21 AM

thorthor: I bet her level of competence wasn't as far below the "doctor's" as you would like to think.

/Fla.


I would normally employ an insult wishing death on you but I think your general contempt for doctors will hasten your demise on its own.
 
2013-04-26 03:11:14 AM

cuzsis: Back in the day we used to call this sort of thing "apprenticeship".

/apparently no one can learn to do something by watching someone anymore and being supervised by that person during actual work.
//they need to spend tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars to be given a certificate that says they understand the theory of how other people have done it.


Sounds like you know fark all about medical education
 
2013-04-26 03:46:53 AM
I've been watching House MD for several years.

I can now diagnose lupus as I've seen it done many times.
 
2013-04-26 04:01:41 AM

cuzsis: Back in the day we used to call this sort of thing "apprenticeship".

/apparently no one can learn to do something by watching someone anymore and being supervised by that person during actual work.
//they need to spend tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars to be given a certificate that says they understand the theory of how other people have done it.


First of all, a major part of that apprenticeship that you describe is working under supervision. Not just watching then doing on your own.

Secondly, that money for a certificate isn't a simple purchase. It involves years of study. And, after said study a graduate has to go through a period of internship. Which is, you know, observing and working under the supervision of a licenced physician. Or, as you call it, apprenticeship.
 
2013-04-26 04:22:04 AM

SpdrJay: I've been watching House MD for several years.

I can now diagnose lupus as I've seen it done many times.


It's not lupus. It's never lupus.
 
2013-04-26 04:47:10 AM

tuna fingers: Pribar: I saw the first part where it says she examined a patient and re wrapped the bandages and thought thats not a good idea but arresting her for that?? then I came to the whole inserting a drain thing umm yea thats a major no no. What thought process kicks in and makes someone think gee this is a great thing to do in a clinical setting?

She probably did it exactly the way the doctor would've though.  The patient then learned afterwards that there was potential for a suit because of the lack of a license and then went for it.
Which brings me to my soapbox.  All of these jobs requiring licenses.  Starting with say... engineers.  The one's that are already part of the club make the licensing tests and requirements.  Obviously there's always a threat of field oversaturation, so each test and requirement gets harder and harder.  This keeps the Old Boys more marketable. This is the way it has always been.
Now, take that same scenario and apply it beauticians.  Cutting hair and painting nails...  The ones in the club keep making it more and more difficult for a young person to enter the trade.  Keep down market saturation.  It's gotten to ridiculous proportions.  Cosmetology students need like 1800 whopping hours now. 1800 to cut hair?  You only need like 60 hours to operate a plane for farks sake.


I'm with you. I do understand the thought process and the need to have a license for certain professions, but in many cases the main role of licensing is to keep prices inflated and limit the competition.

Sort of related: think of what a primary care physician probably does on an average day. Patients with colds, the flu, high blood pressure...etc. 99% of what they come into contact with could be done by someone with 6 months to a year of training. They go through all that schooling and then demand such a high salary when most of what they do doesn't require that training or deserve that amount of pay.
 
2013-04-26 05:26:09 AM
She's seen it done plenty of times?
She does the medical billing.  Why the fark was she hanging out in surgery watching?  And apparently with a front row seat on a regular basis if she thinks she can do it herself and it'll be just fine.
 
2013-04-26 05:52:05 AM

justoneznot: They go through all that schooling and then demand such a high salary when most of what they do doesn't require that training or deserve that amount of pay.


Honestly, the cost of medical (and, really any professional) education is so high that many practitioners simply can't afford to charge less for their services.
 
2013-04-26 06:01:30 AM

penthesilea: She's seen it done plenty of times?
She does the medical billing.  Why the fark was she hanging out in surgery watching?  And apparently with a front row seat on a regular basis if she thinks she can do it herself and it'll be just fine.



She "fluted" a swollen area. So the "procedure" consisted of... sticking a needle in the tissue and letting the fluid drain out.

/The point of requiring a license is more so you know how to react to 1000s of possible side effects and problems more so than ability to lance a boil or whatever.
 
2013-04-26 06:11:50 AM
Tfa does not explain if a doctor or nurse would have done anything different
 
2013-04-26 06:23:45 AM

jaytkay: Tfa does not explain if a doctor or nurse would have done anything different


Doesn't matter. Even if inserting a drain was the correct procedure she doesn't have the training nor authorization to perform it.

A doctor goes through intensive training starting with medical school, moves onto internship and serves as a resident, generally in their chosen specialty (surgical, OB-GYN, pediatrics, etc..).

Many hosptials & private practices require RNs to have at least a Bachelor's Degree.
 
2013-04-26 07:04:40 AM

KrispyKritter: there was a good episode of Law & Order in which lady surgeon lost her touch but her experienced layman assistant had gifted hands.


That is a much better situation because the surgeon has the knowledge and judgment to tell her assistant what to do and how to fix mistakes/crises that might arise.  If she left him unsupervised it would be a whole different situation because he wouldn't know how to fix problems.
 
2013-04-26 07:58:36 AM
I can't think this is that uncommon.  I myself have practiced numerous medical techniques on women without a license.

Mostly fertilization procedures and tissue manipulation, but still.
 
2013-04-26 08:13:20 AM
Reminds me of office attitudes in the Midwest where a 30 year secretary will biatch when a new plant manager is hired who can't possibly know as much as she does about the place.
 
2013-04-26 08:14:50 AM
i184.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-26 08:27:46 AM

pheelix: If you walk into a plastic surgeon's office and this is what greets you, you turn around and leave.  Immediately.

[bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.com image 720x486]


Her face is so tight you could bounce quarters off it.
 
2013-04-26 08:29:04 AM
As much as I think the specialists I see for various medical issues don't know what they're talking about, Isure as hell don't want an office manager trying to step in as a substitute.
 
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