If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(NYPost)   More than 10% of the adults in New York City have diabetes. If only there was some kind of ban on large, sugary drinks   (nypost.com) divider line 163
    More: Sad, New York City, American Diabetes Association, amputations, soft drinks, deaths  
•       •       •

2089 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Apr 2013 at 12:08 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



163 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-04-25 05:41:31 PM  

LiberalEastCoastElitist: GoldSpider: puppetmaster745: The small Walmart community stores would be great for inner-city food deserts, but that would be bad because Walmart.

That's a much bigger problem than the availability of sugary drinks, but don't try to tell Bloomberg there are problems in his city that can't be solved with the banhammer.

I lived in Bed Stuy NY and was in walking distance of three grocery stores selling fresh produce, in addition to the little produce carts the city subsidizes. I challenge the notion that food deserts are common, and if they are, they are due to the palate of the locals, not a giant conspiracy by multinationals to kill Americans with their forks.


Nah, it not the food palate that creates the inner-city food desert.  It is the lack of desire on the part of many people in the inner-city to pay for the things that they remove from the store shelves.  Shop lifting and robberies pretty much removed every grocery store and 7-11 from the city where I used to live.
 
2013-04-25 05:46:37 PM  

keypusher: odinsposse: cirby: Vegetable oils, for the most part. We've reduced animal fats by a large margin. It should be "oils with a little bit of fats".

Nope. Animal fat consumption has gone up too. We're eating leaner meat but more of it and it results in an increased consumption. I swear I had a graph that showed a breakdown of the different kinds fat consumption for this period for that but I can't find it now. This is the best I can do. From the USDA this graph at least shows we're eating slightly more animal fat than we were in the 70's.

[www.indiana.edu image 450x320]

So what happened in the 40s through the 70s?  My mom says she first ate margarine during WWII, because of rationing -- she hated it.  But is margarine, crisco, etc. what that chart reflects?


Possibly. I was thinking it was fat derived from meat, which was also rationed during WWII. I could be wrong though. The description is kind of vague.
 
2013-04-25 05:53:08 PM  

tarhammer:FarkedOver: draa: As food prices increase and wages don"t

It's fair to point out as well that as wages have been kept artificially low productivity has more than doubled since that time period as well.

People are being paid less and forced to work more just to maintain an existence.


Actually, if you look at the total compensation package, what is happening is the increases in productivity are being swallowed up by increased health insurance premiums. I held a part time union job once where 1/3 of my compensation was in the form of blue cross/blue shield health insurance. It's very nice insurance with very low deductibles and prescription coverage, but almost a complete waste of money for a 20-something. I think it was $700/month.
 
2013-04-25 06:03:23 PM  

LiberalEastCoastElitist: GoldSpider: puppetmaster745: The small Walmart community stores would be great for inner-city food deserts, but that would be bad because Walmart.

That's a much bigger problem than the availability of sugary drinks, but don't try to tell Bloomberg there are problems in his city that can't be solved with the banhammer.

I lived in Bed Stuy NY and was in walking distance of three grocery stores selling fresh produce, in addition to the little produce carts the city subsidizes. I challenge the notion that food deserts are common, and if they are, they are due to the palate of the locals, not a giant conspiracy by multinationals to kill Americans with their forks.


Yeah... this is kinda my point, too.  I hear this stuff about food deserts constantly but even the crappiest parts of NYC seem to have some kind of small grocery store with a produce section within a quarter-mile.  It seems more like trying to make excuses for the fact that bad for you food is cheaper and more delicious than good for you food.
 
2013-04-25 06:13:06 PM  

odinsposse: keypusher: odinsposse: cirby: Vegetable oils, for the most part. We've reduced animal fats by a large margin. It should be "oils with a little bit of fats".

Nope. Animal fat consumption has gone up too. We're eating leaner meat but more of it and it results in an increased consumption. I swear I had a graph that showed a breakdown of the different kinds fat consumption for this period for that but I can't find it now. This is the best I can do. From the USDA this graph at least shows we're eating slightly more animal fat than we were in the 70's.

[www.indiana.edu image 450x320]

So what happened in the 40s through the 70s?  My mom says she first ate margarine during WWII, because of rationing -- she hated it.  But is margarine, crisco, etc. what that chart reflects?

Possibly. I was thinking it was fat derived from meat, which was also rationed during WWII. I could be wrong though. The description is kind of vague.


Sorry, I didn't say that very well.   What I meant was, "why did American consumption of animal fat fall so sharply from the 40s through the 70s?  Was it because people stopped using butter and lard and switched to margarine and Crisco?"
 
2013-04-25 07:06:19 PM  
Problem with the news spreading these "obesity epidemic" stories and linking them to diabetes is part of their misunderstanding about how people get it.  If you're obese, your risk for type 2 is higher, but if you have someone in your family who is diabetic or you're a member of certain minority groups your risk gets even higher.  But there are thin people out there who have type 2 diabetes, and not every obese person will develop the illness.

With that said, I was just recently diagnosed with Type 2 a couple of weeks ago.  I kind of ignored the warning signs (my mother is also type 2, I had gestational diabetes when I was pregnant with my son five years ago,and I do fall into the "overweight" category), but now I'm taking the news as an opportunity to improve my health.  I've already started changing my eating habits, and according to the scale have lost 8 pounds so far.  I told my doctor that I didn't want to mess with this -- I saw what it did to my late brother in law, who died of a heart attack and wasn't diagnosed until after he was in the hospital.  I personally think that the government nutrition guidelines are a crock -- it heavily emphasizes foods that have a lot of carbs as the biggest portion of the pyramid, and it's leading to more people getting the disease because they can't handle the carb overload.
 
2013-04-25 07:10:23 PM  
keypusher:
Sorry, I didn't say that very well. What I meant was, "why did American consumption of animal fat fall so sharply from the 40s through the 70s? Was it because people stopped using butter and lard and switched to margarine and Crisco?"

Pretty much that.

Margarine was a cheap butter substitute, and once people got used to it, they kept using it because of the price advantage (and longer storage times, too).

In the 1950s, when the early (supposed) link between saturated fats and heart disease was first suggested, a lot of margarine makers started pushing margarine as a "healthy" substitute for butter. These margarines had a large amount of transfats in their makeup due to the processes used. This continued until the 1990s, when the connection between transfats and heart disease was nailed down. Up till that point, some nutritionists actually suggested trans-fats were good for you, since they didn't have much known effect on the human body at the time, and would represent less calories from fat.

Remember that some trans-fats are actually good for you - the ones naturally found in (you guessed it) animal sources.

One of the surest ways to cut coronary heart disease (after losing weight and getting exercise) is to eliminate trans-fats from the diet. By using animal fats, for the most part.
 
2013-04-25 08:12:54 PM  

soup: Yeah because the mayor of NYC has the power to introduce federal legislation.


NYC does have a congressional delegation. Maybe they could make themselves known for something other than
corruption and tweeting pictures of their junk.

FarkedOver: the government has a vested interest in keeping it citizens healthy for a variety of reasons.


They sure have a funny way of showing it.

The government's actions point more toward having a vested interest in the accumulation of power by keeping people dependent on them and by cultivating mutually beneficial relationships with big business - and what more wonderful way to do that is by fattening up poor people on big-box subsidized processed crap, sending them off to diabeetusland, where they can have their condition 'managed' (cured? oh HELL no) by a pharmaceutical company until they're old enough for Medicare at which point an additional set of big businesses get to wet their beaks.

"Military" isn't the only word that fits before "-industrial complex."
 
2013-04-25 08:54:48 PM  

PseUdononymous Savagery: Di beetus beetus
[ts3.mm.bing.net image 282x182]


s16.postimg.org
Wilford Brimley cat does not approve.
 
2013-04-25 09:49:20 PM  
Damn, these fat jokes got serious.
 
2013-04-25 09:57:02 PM  
Ironically, a lot of that diabetes might have a root cause in their gut bacteria.  One genus, especially, called enterobacter produces a toxin that strongly contributes to weight gain.  Typically people have 30-40 dominant types bacteria in their gut, but people who are morbidly obese have flora that is almost 1/3rd enterobacter.

Likewise, irritated MAST cells can contribute strongly to weight gain.

Other bacteria, and Archaea, are also extremely important to the equation.  While radical, medically supervised, very low calorie diets for a month or two may be able to halt or reverse early onset diabetes, at least temporarily, there are a bunch of other contributing factors, such as ability to absorb nutrients, metabolism, and yet, what types of food are consumed and how digestible they are.
 
2013-04-25 11:26:00 PM  
FarkedOver

If only people were given a living wage and could afford to make healthier decisions.

Where the fark do you live that has water more expensive than soda?

For fark sake start taking responsibility and stop blaming others.
 
2013-04-26 01:38:43 AM  
This New Yorker here keeps gradually gaining weight and I'm the heaviest I've ever been --  202 pounds and 5 foot 4. Was down to 170 pounds a year and a half ago after recuperating from a serious illness. Wanted to get down further to below 150 pounds, but instead gained 30 pounds plus.  Don't want to look at myself in mirror. Clothes are all tight. Have more difficulty with steps.  The culprit for me is life style and habits have worsened.  Spend increasing amount of time on computer/internet/sitting.  Make breakfast and lunch. But rarely cook anymore which I used to do regularly,  and eat dinners out now mostly.  Snack too much. I rarely exercise. My dog is extremely elderly and can not go on long walks anymore.  I've never had diabetes; but I'm way overdue for an appointment with my internist. Need check up and blood tests.  Ran out of lipitor for high cholesterol.  Need to spend less time on computer, begin exercise, cook dinners.  I don't want to look like that morbidly obese woman in the Post picture.
 
Displayed 13 of 163 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report