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(Philly.com)   H-1B visas: bad for you, bad for America, but good for profitability and driving down wages   (philly.com) divider line 137
    More: Obvious, guest workers, skilled workers, open positions  
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1383 clicks; posted to Politics » on 25 Apr 2013 at 10:35 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-25 10:38:18 AM
That's the point.
 
2013-04-25 10:38:24 AM
Work the same amount as the H-1B workers and you be sorted. Is 80-100 hours a week for $25000 really so bad?
 
2013-04-25 10:42:06 AM
I'd rather have the talented people of the world working for us than against us.
 
2013-04-25 10:42:32 AM
"The problem, he said, is that various work visas are bringing in so many STEM workers from other countries who are willing to work for lower wages that U.S. STEM graduates either can't command the pay they expected or can't find jobs in their fields. " says the most ridiculously, painfully obvious sentence ever written.
 
2013-04-25 10:43:12 AM

limeyfellow: Is 80-100 hours a week for $25000 really so bad?


It would be, if that ever happened, which it does not.
 
2013-04-25 10:45:07 AM
FTFA: "There's no shortage of homegrown talent, Salzman said"

That is adorable and hilarious.
 
2013-04-25 10:47:29 AM
Just a couple of years ago there was a study that also showed that 95% or so of H1B visa folks never immigrate here either.  So the visa'd workers see it as a ticket to get better wages, send most of their money back out of the US, and the leave when the visa expires.

Common sense I guess.  But it doesn't help anyone except businesses'  bottom line and most of the wages are never spent in the local economy.
 
2013-04-25 10:47:34 AM

Lost Thought 00: I'd rather have the talented people of the world working for us than against us.


Who is "us". You think the multinationals are on your side? And foreign based firms use H-1B visas too.
 
2013-04-25 10:48:16 AM
Maybe if the smart kids weren't put down for being nerds and geeks by their peers we wouldn't have this problem?
 
2013-04-25 10:51:15 AM

AngryDragon: "The problem, he said, is that various work visas are bringing in so many STEM workers from other countries who are willing to work for lower wages that U.S. STEM graduates either can't command the pay they expected or can't find jobs in their fields. " says the most ridiculously, painfully obvious sentence ever written.


You want to see quick changes in the H1-B system?  Pass a law making them eligible for the big government grants (RO1s, DOD, etc.).  When the PIs that are so used to using it for cheap labor realize their asses are on the line, too, you'll hear calls to change the system really farking quick.
 
2013-04-25 10:51:18 AM

Lost Thought 00: I'd rather have the talented people of the world working for us than against us.


Nice try Microsoft project manager.
 
2013-04-25 10:52:20 AM

TheGreatGazoo: Maybe if the smart kids weren't put down for being nerds and geeks by their peers we wouldn't have this problem?


And give up our world domination in HS football?  NEVER!
 
2013-04-25 10:52:31 AM

Lost Thought 00: I'd rather have the talented people of the world working for us than against us.


Taking jobs that should go to Americans, sending dollars overseas, and depressing wages for US citizens? They are working against us.
 
2013-04-25 10:52:58 AM
To paraphrase  Noam Chomsky ~ The pampered western workers must abandon their luxurious lifestyles...

There will be the 1% and everyone else will be in rags and digging in the mud.
 
2013-04-25 10:53:46 AM
U-6 unemployment is at 13.8% and the economy suffers from a demand shortage.

But by all means, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, let's keep that job market tight and depress wages further.
 
2013-04-25 10:56:23 AM

DrewCurtisJr: Who is "us". You think the multinationals are on your side? And foreign based firms use H-1B visas too.


About a decade ago I worked for Intel while Intel was letting US workers go and expanding in India and China. I listened to Craig Barrett tell a large room of people who were wondering why a US company would be supporting India and China job growth rather than employment in the USA. Craig told the crowd that Intel is not an American company, it's an international company. The only thing Craig cared about was the stock price. Everyone in the room was overpaid as far as he was concerned.
 
2013-04-25 10:57:15 AM
""Put simply," he said, "our economy is producing more high-skilled jobs than there are high-skilled workers to fill them at the salary we want to pay"


Fixed.
 
2013-04-25 10:57:26 AM

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Lost Thought 00: I'd rather have the talented people of the world working for us than against us.

Taking jobs that should go to Americans, sending dollars overseas, and depressing wages for US citizens? They are working against us.


1 - "Should go to Americans"? Why do Americans have some inherent right to those jobs over others? Don't you believe in a free market?
2 - Most H1-Bs are working towards permanent residence. Their money stays here, used buy houses here, cars here, raising a family here.
3 - There is no statistical evidence of wage depression for H1-B -heavy industries versus those that don't

Honestly, all the opposition to this boils down to xenophobia and racism
 
2013-04-25 10:58:18 AM

BafflerMeal: Just a couple of years ago there was a study that also showed that 95% or so of H1B visa folks never immigrate here either.  So the visa'd workers see it as a ticket to get better wages, send most of their money back out of the US, and the leave when the visa expires.

Common sense I guess.  But it doesn't help anyone except businesses'  bottom line and most of the wages are never spent in the local economy.


What the hell are you on about. An H1B IS living in America, at least for the duration of their visa. They buy or rent cars, they rent apartments, they buy lots of clothing, food, and daily expenses. They clog up the road to Redmond, and force Microsoft to buy a fleet of busses to Connector their asses around town from campus to campus. Oh, yeah, they fill up office buildings and create a bunch of new work for local contractors that provide to the employer.

If at the end of the contract they go back to Bangalore they just open up a slot for the next one, and the cycle repeats.

Or, the H1B meets and marries someone here, has a baby who now has two intelligent and employed parents, and the parent(s) start the process on becoming a US citizen. Or they don't. Up to them.

It *might* be the case they are pushing local talent out of a job, but honestly, big companies can and do hire locally as well. They hire locally, they recruit nationally, and then they look overseas when talent pools arent filled.

As for "driving down wages..." I sure don't see it, and I live in the middle of one of the biggest H1B portals in the USA. Tech employees are well paid, always have been well paid, and continue to be well paid. Do starter wages keep up with what you have to spend on an education? No, that is a separate issue though... One you should really be looking at the colleges, who are currently recruiting more -- guess what -- overseas talent to fill seats at 3 times the payment rate as domestic students pay.
 
2013-04-25 11:01:53 AM
Simple solution.  If you hire an H1B worker, you pay a tax that brings your cost into alignment with the average cost for an American worker filling the same role.  Take the profitability out if it.

If you can't honestly find the skills in the U.S., the option is still open to you to bring someone else in.  But you shouldn't get to save money in the process.
 
2013-04-25 11:01:54 AM

Sum Guye: DrewCurtisJr: Who is "us". You think the multinationals are on your side? And foreign based firms use H-1B visas too.

About a decade ago I worked for Intel while Intel was letting US workers go and expanding in India and China. I listened to Craig Barrett tell a large room of people who were wondering why a US company would be supporting India and China job growth rather than employment in the USA. Craig told the crowd that Intel is not an American company, it's an international company. The only thing Craig cared about was the stock price. Everyone in the room was overpaid as far as he was concerned.


But but but we've been told that big companies would do just fine with less regulation and more freedoms, because they would naturally make decisions that would help the nation at large. After all, if they hurt american workers or the general public, that would hurt their own customers. Right? Selling out their own people is against their own interests, isnt it?
 
2013-04-25 11:01:55 AM

EatHam: limeyfellow: Is 80-100 hours a week for $25000 really so bad?

It would be, if that ever happened, which it does not.


You're right, dude.  You need to add 10 years experience and two Masters requirements, be a (proven) non-smoker, pass a drug screening, have no preexisting conditions, be male and childless, oh, and you don't get to keep most of that $25k because of the just-lowered-for-the-ninth-year-in-a-row employer contribution to the insurance.  THEN it sounds more like a contemporary, realistic job offer.  Of course, it's officially only 40 hours, but if you do'nt want to get fired or spend your time being harped on by a manager (or three) making six figures whose sole job is to ride you, it will bloat to 80 in no time, especially once they let you in on the 200-300 day a year travel requirements and lay off all your coworkers.

The point is we shouldn't allow the US job landscape to become such that in order to earn more than minimum wage you must accept no set schedule, no two days off in a row, no set shift, less than 40 hours so no benefits, but unpaid overtime requiring more than 40 real hours, often far more, or uncompensated eggregious travel requirements.  All of these things are FAR too common, and it needs to be reversed.
 
2013-04-25 11:01:55 AM

BafflerMeal: Just a couple of years ago there was a study that also showed that 95% or so of H1B visa folks never immigrate here either.


Do you have a source for that, because I can't find anything on the topic, and it directly contradicts all my personal experience with the program.
 
2013-04-25 11:03:42 AM

Lost Thought 00: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Lost Thought 00: I'd rather have the talented people of the world working for us than against us.

Taking jobs that should go to Americans, sending dollars overseas, and depressing wages for US citizens? They are working against us.

1 - "Should go to Americans"? Why do Americans have some inherent right to those jobs over others? Don't you believe in a free market?
2 - Most H1-Bs are working towards permanent residence. Their money stays here, used buy houses here, cars here, raising a family here.
3 - There is no statistical evidence of wage depression for H1-B -heavy industries versus those that don't

Honestly, all the opposition to this boils down to xenophobia and racism


Why it should go to Americans? Because that's the point of a sovereign state: to protect the interest of its citizens, and in the case of the US, supposedly even the lowest blue-collar American with the least resources. That's not racism or xenophobia, that's patriotism .I don't go goose-steeping to the buzzwords "Free Market" either just because it's what the economic elite claims exists today, except when it serves those citizens' interests.
 
2013-04-25 11:03:45 AM

Lost Thought 00: BafflerMeal: Just a couple of years ago there was a study that also showed that 95% or so of H1B visa folks never immigrate here either.

Do you have a source for that, because I can't find anything on the topic, and it directly contradicts all my personal experience with the program.


Looking for it currently, it was a couple of years back and the percentage I remember was 96%.
 
2013-04-25 11:04:40 AM
What's good for the bottom line of the corporations that sponsor congresscritters is good for America.  Fark you citizens, you aren't even part of the equation anymore.
 
2013-04-25 11:04:53 AM

BafflerMeal: Just a couple of years ago there was a study that also showed that 95% or so of H1B visa folks never immigrate here either.  So the visa'd workers see it as a ticket to get better wages, send most of their money back out of the US, and the leave when the visa expires.

Common sense I guess.  But it doesn't help anyone except businesses'  bottom line and most of the wages are never spent in the local economy.


They should offer a simple path to citizenship through h1-b. We'd be keeping more of the talent we're lacking instead of losing them in a few years, and I would think it would lessen the wage depressing effects.
 
2013-04-25 11:10:17 AM

Generation_D: BafflerMeal: Just a couple of years ago there was a study that also showed that 95% or so of H1B visa folks never immigrate here either.  So the visa'd workers see it as a ticket to get better wages, send most of their money back out of the US, and the leave when the visa expires.

Common sense I guess.  But it doesn't help anyone except businesses'  bottom line and most of the wages are never spent in the local economy.

What the hell are you on about. An H1B IS living in America, at least for the duration of their visa. They buy or rent cars, they rent apartments, they buy lots of clothing, food, and daily expenses. They clog up the road to Redmond, and force Microsoft to buy a fleet of busses to Connector their asses around town from campus to campus. Oh, yeah, they fill up office buildings and create a bunch of new work for local contractors that provide to the employer.

If at the end of the contract they go back to Bangalore they just open up a slot for the next one, and the cycle repeats.

Or, the H1B meets and marries someone here, has a baby who now has two intelligent and employed parents, and the parent(s) start the process on becoming a US citizen. Or they don't. Up to them.

It *might* be the case they are pushing local talent out of a job, but honestly, big companies can and do hire locally as well. They hire locally, they recruit nationally, and then they look overseas when talent pools arent filled.

As for "driving down wages..." I sure don't see it, and I live in the middle of one of the biggest H1B portals in the USA. Tech employees are well paid, always have been well paid, and continue to be well paid. Do starter wages keep up with what you have to spend on an education? No, that is a separate issue though... One you should really be looking at the colleges, who are currently recruiting more -- guess what -- overseas talent to fill seats at 3 times the payment rate as domestic students pay.


I was similarly confused, but then I decided he meant they don't immigrate to the US permanently.
 
2013-04-25 11:11:10 AM
Here's my overall point - we should be bringing as many talented people into this country as possible, and make it as easy as possible for them to settle here permanently (and take the power away from companies to determine whether or not they can settle). I feel our immigration system is way too complex and needs reformed, and I feel that people who have H1-B jobs should be given a relatively easy-pass to green cards. We want talented people to settle here. That will not only help the companies who bring them here, it will help everyone as it will raise our GDP and drive our economy, while simultaneously draining our international rivals.

The first step to getting university educated people to settle here (who even staunch immigration opponents will agree are the "right type" of immigrants) is the H1-B program. You shut that down, immigration will largely trend towards hardship cases which have a larger negative impact on the economy.
 
2013-04-25 11:12:17 AM
H-1B - the new indentured servitude.

Somewhat milder than the original, but with even less chance of actual citizenship.
 
2013-04-25 11:15:57 AM

Lost Thought 00: BafflerMeal: Just a couple of years ago there was a study that also showed that 95% or so of H1B visa folks never immigrate here either.

Do you have a source for that, because I can't find anything on the topic, and it directly contradicts all my personal experience with the program.



H1B and any other forms of foreign guest workers bleed money out of the country.

The dream of "moving to the US, becoming a citizen, and joining the american landscape" died post WW2, because it no longer became necessary to go through all that to get american money.
Its called 'Remittance' and its billions and billions of dollars a year. Thats money paid in salary that leaves domestic circulation, never to return. India alone is set to take in 70 billion (in USD) this year along. I bet thats a lot of IT jobs in there.

Ive been to places in India and Latin America, where big new houses sit empty, or under construction for years. Typically a worker will come to the US and stay for a few years, spending as little as possible. Any money left gets sent home, and piece by piece, their new houses are built. Once the work is done, they go home and 'retire' in relative luxury, enjoying spending their american dollars at extremely favorable exchange rates.
 
2013-04-25 11:20:18 AM

Lost Thought 00: 1 - "Should go to Americans"? Why do Americans have some inherent right to those jobs over others?

 Don't you believe in a free market?

If they are selling to the American market we have a right to demand they make every attempt to employ Americans first. That's why.

2 - Most H1-Bs are working towards permanent residence. Their money stays here, used buy houses here, cars here, raising a family here.

And the American workers wouldn't spend their money here? What's your point?.

3 - There is no statistical evidence of wage depression for H1-B -heavy industries versus those that don't

Depends on what studies you look at.
 
2013-04-25 11:22:00 AM

Lost Thought 00: Here's my overall point - we should be bringing as many talented people into this country as possible, and make it as easy as possible for them to settle here permanently (and take the power away from companies to determine whether or not they can settle). I feel our immigration system is way too complex and needs reformed, and I feel that people who have H1-B jobs should be given a relatively easy-pass to green cards. We want talented people to settle here.


The problem is , they dont WANT to settle here. They dont want what we have. They see us working to death in the hopes that maybe someday we have *maybe* enough saved so we can retire at 80 and avoid dying destitute.  Its a much better deal for them to work here for 10-20 years, then get the fark out, go home, and live where $100 a month gets you a full time housekeeper and a cook.
 
2013-04-25 11:22:14 AM
The ugly side to this is never mentioned:  That outsourced jobs help develop the talent that we then bring back here as H1-B.  We're not developing talent anymore...we're farked.
 
2013-04-25 11:23:20 AM

Lost Thought 00: Here's my overall point - we should be bringing as many talented people into this country as possible, and make it as easy as possible for them to settle here permanently (and take the power away from companies to determine whether or not they can settle). I feel our immigration system is way too complex and needs reformed, and I feel that people who have H1-B jobs should be given a relatively easy-pass to green cards. We want talented people to settle here. That will not only help the companies who bring them here, it will help everyone as it will raise our GDP and drive our economy, while simultaneously draining our international rivals.

The first step to getting university educated people to settle here (who even staunch immigration opponents will agree are the "right type" of immigrants) is the H1-B program. You shut that down, immigration will largely trend towards hardship cases which have a larger negative impact on the economy.


And meanwhile, US citizens, including college graduates, are widely unemployed and underemployed. We can't keep being the Land of Opportunity for the world's needy when we aren't delivering that to our own people. You may not be someone who's just starting out, but I am. A lot of us are, and we are getting shortchanged everywhere through no faults of our own. If the "Free Market" deigns it ethical to enact protective tariffs on behalf of US companies, it should do likewise for US workers. Obviously there are a lot of pieces to fixing the economy and helping the middle and working classes, but immigration policy must reflect what is best for America, which means what is best for the greatest number of our citizens.
 
2013-04-25 11:26:25 AM

LemSkroob: Lost Thought 00: Here's my overall point - we should be bringing as many talented people into this country as possible, and make it as easy as possible for them to settle here permanently (and take the power away from companies to determine whether or not they can settle). I feel our immigration system is way too complex and needs reformed, and I feel that people who have H1-B jobs should be given a relatively easy-pass to green cards. We want talented people to settle here.

The problem is , they dont WANT to settle here. They dont want what we have. They see us working to death in the hopes that maybe someday we have *maybe* enough saved so we can retire at 80 and avoid dying destitute.  Its a much better deal for them to work here for 10-20 years, then get the fark out, go home, and live where $100 a month gets you a full time housekeeper and a cook.


Every single H1-B employee I've hired has spent their entire H1-B duration working hard to get a greencard. Not all of them make it, but every single one tried.
 
2013-04-25 11:26:44 AM

slayer199: The ugly side to this is never mentioned:  That outsourced jobs help develop the talent that we then bring back here as H1-B.  We're not developing talent anymore...we're farked.


The other side is they go back to their home countries, after being given training and experience here, and start their own firms to compete in the U.S. market.
 
2013-04-25 11:26:57 AM

Lost Thought 00: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Lost Thought 00: I'd rather have the talented people of the world working for us than against us.

Taking jobs that should go to Americans, sending dollars overseas, and depressing wages for US citizens? They are working against us.

1 - "Should go to Americans"? Why do Americans have some inherent right to those jobs over others? Don't you believe in a free market?
2 - Most H1-Bs are working towards permanent residence. Their money stays here, used buy houses here, cars here, raising a family here.
3 - There is no statistical evidence of wage depression for H1-B -heavy industries versus those that don't

Honestly, all the opposition to this boils down to xenophobia and racism


There are no free markets in the United States, none. There are only regulated markets.

The question is why shouldn't we biatch about regulations, in this case H1-Bs that depress our wages. As to why those jobs should go to Americans, well we live here and they don't. The only reason they are allowed into the country is to depress the wages of those who worked our asses off, at 10 times the cost, to get those degrees and skills.

So, sure import all the foreign workers you want, but don't expect the US to continue to be the leader in technology, innovation, or economics when you do. The question is where does your nationalist sentiments lie? Do you care if you country is the best in the world and stays the best in the world? Or are you going to condemn the US to be like France and England always bemoaning their lost empire as the Chinease dominate the world.
 
2013-04-25 11:29:36 AM

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: nd meanwhile, US citizens, including college graduates, are widely unemployed and underemployed.


The unemployment rate in the US for people with STEM degrees (which is what we are discussing here), is about 3-4%, depending on the exact degree and level of education.
 
2013-04-25 11:37:57 AM

DrewCurtisJr: The other side is they go back to their home countries, after being given training and experience here, and start their own firms to compete in the U.S. market.


That too.

I've been very fortunate in my career to have started in IT when I did ('97).  Kids today are farked.  It's not an unfixable situation as you still need to compete on price at the entry-level...but you really need to sell the value-add of local talent.
 
2013-04-25 11:38:27 AM
Lost Thought 00:
1 - "Should go to Americans"? Why do Americans have some inherent right to those jobs over others? Don't you believe in a free market?
2 - Most H1-Bs are working towards permanent residence. Their money stays here, used buy houses here, cars here, raising a family here.
3 - There is no statistical evidence of wage depression for H1-B -heavy industries versus those that don't

Honestly, all the opposition to this boils down to xenophobia and racism


1 - America worked hard and sacrificed many lives to increase our standard of living. And as the larget consumer market in the world, we have the right and the power to maintain it.
2 - Any evidence of that? Usually it seems that this is happening.
3 - There are barely any industries left that don't exploit foreign labor. And every time it happens it depresses the value of labor for the whole job market by increasing the supply of  unemployed workers.

I wouldn't want American labor being devalued by cheap, Canadian labor either. And there's nothing noble about importing worker desperation from foreign countries.
 
2013-04-25 11:40:03 AM

Lost Thought 00: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: nd meanwhile, US citizens, including college graduates, are widely unemployed and underemployed.

The unemployment rate in the US for people with STEM degrees (which is what we are discussing here), is about 3-4%, depending on the exact degree and level of education.


What about underemployment rate and rate of STEM graduates not working in their field of study?

How many STEM graduates are working in finance?
 
2013-04-25 11:40:54 AM
H-1B visas: bad for you, bad for America, but good for profitability and driving down wages

Precisely.  I know plenty of good high-tech workers who are still unemployed and underemployed thanks to these greedy pricks.
 
2013-04-25 11:42:47 AM

WayToBlue: BafflerMeal: Just a couple of years ago there was a study that also showed that 95% or so of H1B visa folks never immigrate here either.  So the visa'd workers see it as a ticket to get better wages, send most of their money back out of the US, and the leave when the visa expires.

Common sense I guess.  But it doesn't help anyone except businesses'  bottom line and most of the wages are never spent in the local economy.

They should offer a simple path to citizenship through h1-b. We'd be keeping more of the talent we're lacking instead of losing them in a few years, and I would think it would lessen the wage depressing effects.


The person sitting next to me is about to have to leave our office and either go back to school or go back to Malaysia. She would much rather stay here, since it's the life she knows and the life she likes, but I guess that's not an option. We're sad to lose her because it means we've got to find another decent coder and train him/her up, and that will take months. Of course, we're right in the middle of a massive project and don't have time to train someone, but that's always the case.
 
2013-04-25 11:43:06 AM

Lost Thought 00: Here's my overall point - we should be bringing as many talented people into this country as possible, and make it as easy as possible for them to settle here permanently (and take the power away from companies to determine whether or not they can settle). I feel our immigration system is way too complex and needs reformed, and I feel that people who have H1-B jobs should be given a relatively easy-pass to green cards. We want talented people to settle here. That will not only help the companies who bring them here, it will help everyone as it will raise our GDP and drive our economy, while simultaneously draining our international rivals.

The first step to getting university educated people to settle here (who even staunch immigration opponents will agree are the "right type" of immigrants) is the H1-B program. You shut that down, immigration will largely trend towards hardship cases which have a larger negative impact on the economy.


So we need everybody we can get through the door, without limit. If we could bring 100 million new, educated STEM workers that would be desirable? The only reform we need is more, easier, faster, right?
 
2013-04-25 11:45:34 AM
To be clear also, I have absolutely nothing against H1B folks or anyone else using systems to help make their life better.  It's not their fault.

But the system is broken from any perspective that is not that of the businesses doing the hiring or the H1B folks themselves.

/Can't find my dammed study.
/Incredibly hard to search for with all the websites geared towards profit working with H1Bs
 
2013-04-25 11:47:40 AM
My experience with H1B personel is mixed.  At the two large corps that I have worked at the H1B folks are treated fairly well and paid the going rate.  The 5 contract firm that I have dealt with are omg evil when it comes to H1B workers.  They will pay them 20-25k less a year than residents and threaten to revoke their sponsorship if the visaed worker pushs back.  Then you get into the contract firms pushing their lawyers to conduct the workers residency requests, freak'n evil, bad, wrong, probably illegal activity.
 
2013-04-25 11:47:44 AM
So it's great when less educated, low income, entry-level workers come into the country, but horrible when workers who are more highly educated and higher income arrive on our shores? What is this, bizarro world?

You know, I used to be more of a "rules are rules and illegal means illegal" kind of guy, but I've gotten to the point where as long as someone is going to work in a legal industry when he gets here, and not cause mayhem or go on the dole, I don't care. I don't see why I should prefer fruit pickers over programmers, either. "Let everyone in unless they threaten my job" isn't a moral argument. It's not even a coherent argument. At best, it's a selfish one, and at worst it's counterproductive.
 
2013-04-25 11:55:13 AM

Lost Thought 00: LemSkroob: Lost Thought 00: Here's my overall point - we should be bringing as many talented people into this country as possible, and make it as easy as possible for them to settle here permanently (and take the power away from companies to determine whether or not they can settle). I feel our immigration system is way too complex and needs reformed, and I feel that people who have H1-B jobs should be given a relatively easy-pass to green cards. We want talented people to settle here.

The problem is , they dont WANT to settle here. They dont want what we have. They see us working to death in the hopes that maybe someday we have *maybe* enough saved so we can retire at 80 and avoid dying destitute.  Its a much better deal for them to work here for 10-20 years, then get the fark out, go home, and live where $100 a month gets you a full time housekeeper and a cook.

Every single H1-B employee I've hired has spent their entire H1-B duration working hard to get a greencard. Not all of them make it, but every single one tried.


Ah ha.. so you're the greedy coont who can't bring himself to pay a living wage to the nerds.
 
2013-04-25 11:56:10 AM
The manfriend is here on an H1-B visa. For two years the company he worked for couldn't find anyone in the US with his skill set for the job, either because no one wanted the job or no one wanted the pay associated with the job. So they let him transfer from a foreign office to here and now they've got a guaranteed worker for three years. Sure they give him benefits and pay him a fair wage that increases yearly over the next three years, but at least they have a guarantee that he's there and they don't have to hire someone else for a while.

/when his visa is up we might move to his home country
//Might be interesting to see how that goes
 
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