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(NJ.com)   TSA agent does CPR, saves passenger's life, amazingly hasn't gotten fired yet   (nj.com) divider line 58
    More: Hero, TSA, CPR, TSA agents, newark, Newark Airport, automated external defibrillators, passengers  
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2663 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Apr 2013 at 1:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-24 09:01:42 PM
FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

/you're never a "former" EMT. The skill and mindset kicks in whenever something goes wrong.

FTFA:  Two passengers, one an ophthalmologist and the other a nurse, also jumped in to help as a flight attendant brought an automated external defibrillator.

Teamwork and rapid, effective CPR, combined with defibrillation, saves lives.
 
2013-04-24 10:25:38 PM

hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

/you're never a "former" EMT. The skill and mindset kicks in whenever something goes wrong.


While it's cool that he assisted in saving the guy's life, I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.
 
2013-04-24 10:30:37 PM
cdn1.hark.com

NO TONGUE!
 
2013-04-24 10:33:17 PM
How does a D&D rep singing "Bad Moon Rising" save anyone's life?!

/dnrtfa
 
2013-04-24 10:51:54 PM
TSA and HERO will never belong together. EVER.
 
2013-04-24 10:55:22 PM
And 3 taint-bombs slipped by security during this.

He was a distraction!
 
2013-04-25 12:35:58 AM

Caradoc: While it's cool that he assisted in saving the guy's life, I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.


It could have been as simple as having something go wrong, or working a bad call and getting burned out. There doesn't necessarily have to be something he did wrong to have caused him to quit. Psychological trauma is a biatch, especially if he was involved in direct field work.
 
2013-04-25 01:48:49 AM
hardinparamedic:
/you're never a "former" EMT. The skill and mindset kicks in whenever something goes wrong.

Is that like the old fat drunk rednecks who are never "former" marines?
 
2013-04-25 01:48:51 AM

hardinparamedic: Caradoc: While it's cool that he assisted in saving the guy's life, I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.

It could have been as simple as having something go wrong, or working a bad call and getting burned out. There doesn't necessarily have to be something he did wrong to have caused him to quit. Psychological trauma is a biatch, especially if he was involved in direct field work.


I saw one and a half of the *real* Boston bombing pics and that was enough to haunt me a little to this day. I clicked on a page, said "Nope!" and closed it down, that's terrible stuff. I know people can get used to a lot, but every once in a while an EMT encounters over a dozen people maimed and dying after some mishap.
 
2013-04-25 01:49:59 AM
Yet being the operative word.

I'm surprised the guy who received CPR isn't sueing for some reason.
 
2013-04-25 01:54:38 AM

iheartscotch: Yet being the operative word.

I'm surprised the guy who received CPR isn't sueing for some reason.


Well, sure, he could. Then the court would force him to pay court costs, defendant attorney fees, and give him a lecture about fraudulent lawsuits.

Good Samaritan laws are fun like that.
 
2013-04-25 01:54:41 AM

hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.


Agreed.

Reminds me of an incident back in 2006 or so that's somewhere in the fark archives.  If I recall right, a guy has a heart attack while driving on the highway and stops in the emergency lane.  First 3 people to stop to aid assistance are two ER nurses, and a defibrillator salesman who happens to have a demo unit with him.
 
2013-04-25 01:56:00 AM

hardinparamedic: Caradoc: While it's cool that he assisted in saving the guy's life, I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.

It could have been as simple as having something go wrong, or working a bad call and getting burned out. There doesn't necessarily have to be something he did wrong to have caused him to quit. Psychological trauma is a biatch, especially if he was involved in direct field work.


It could also just be that he put his 20 or 25 years in, got his pension all taken care of, then decided on some easier work. The unplanned travel involved with being a federal marshal alone is understandably something someone wouldn't want to be doing when they are 55.
 
2013-04-25 01:57:41 AM

Begoggle: Is that like the old fat drunk rednecks who are never "former" marines?


"Former Marine" implies that you're either in the US Marine Core, or you did something so stupid that even the Marines didn't want you (Dishonorable Discharge).

It's kind of the culture they learn from day one of Basic.
 
2013-04-25 01:57:46 AM
Good on this guy as an individual.   It's a shame the TSA will milk this PR for all it's worth.
 
2013-04-25 01:59:31 AM
This story is what the Hero tag was made for.
 
2013-04-25 02:04:12 AM
Since a TSA agent was involved, did anyone check to make sure the person's wallet and other valuables were still there afterward?
 
2013-04-25 02:04:49 AM

hardinparamedic: iheartscotch: Yet being the operative word.

I'm surprised the guy who received CPR isn't sueing for some reason.

Well, sure, he could. Then the court would force him to pay court costs, defendant attorney fees, and give him a lecture about fraudulent lawsuits.

Good Samaritan laws are fun like that.


Yeahhhhhh......while Good Samaritan laws offer a lot of protection; all it takes is some idiot judge to disallow it once and it becomes case law.

/ maybe I'm getting too cynical
 
2013-04-25 02:06:27 AM

hardinparamedic: US Marine Core


Semper Fib.
 
2013-04-25 02:09:51 AM

UsikFark: hardinparamedic: US Marine Core

Semper Fib.


GODDAMN YOU HOW DARE YOU QUESTION OUR ARMED FORCES
/FLY NAVY
//TOO OBVIOUS?
 
2013-04-25 02:09:57 AM
After a few tense moments, Kennish felt a pulse.

"Afterwards I couldn't believe it," Kennish, an 11-year veteran of the TSA, said in an interview today. "She had a strong pulse - I couldn't believe it."


That says something about your chances with CPR right there.
 
2013-04-25 02:10:44 AM

Roquefort: UsikFark: hardinparamedic: US Marine Core

Semper Fib.

GODDAMN YOU HOW DARE YOU QUESTION OUR ARMED FORCES
/FLY NAVY
//TOO OBVIOUS?


Son, your disrespect the Core.
 
2013-04-25 02:18:29 AM

iheartscotch: hardinparamedic: iheartscotch: Yet being the operative word.

I'm surprised the guy who received CPR isn't sueing for some reason.

Well, sure, he could. Then the court would force him to pay court costs, defendant attorney fees, and give him a lecture about fraudulent lawsuits.

Good Samaritan laws are fun like that.

Yeahhhhhh......while Good Samaritan laws offer a lot of protection; all it takes is some idiot judge to disallow it once and it becomes case law.

/ maybe I'm getting too cynical


That's not really how the system works, fortunately. And the law impacts waaaay too many things, it's far too beneficial.
 
2013-04-25 02:20:54 AM

Spaceman Spiffed: hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

Agreed.

Reminds me of an incident back in 2006 or so that's somewhere in the fark archives.  If I recall right, a guy has a heart attack while driving on the highway and stops in the emergency lane.  First 3 people to stop to aid assistance are two ER nurses, and a defibrillator salesman who happens to have a demo unit with him.


Not too long ago there was a story/video about a dispatcher for a medevac paramedic team had a MI at work with said paramedics in the room with their equipment watching him deteriorate.
 
2013-04-25 02:22:30 AM

iheartscotch: hardinparamedic: iheartscotch: Yet being the operative word.

I'm surprised the guy who received CPR isn't sueing for some reason.

Well, sure, he could. Then the court would force him to pay court costs, defendant attorney fees, and give him a lecture about fraudulent lawsuits.

Good Samaritan laws are fun like that.

Yeahhhhhh......while Good Samaritan laws offer a lot of protection; all it takes is some idiot judge to disallow it once and it becomes case law.

/ maybe I'm getting too cynical


Precedent isn't generally set by local courts.
 
2013-04-25 02:24:37 AM
 
2013-04-25 02:24:57 AM

Summoner101: Spaceman Spiffed: hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

Agreed.

Reminds me of an incident back in 2006 or so that's somewhere in the fark archives.  If I recall right, a guy has a heart attack while driving on the highway and stops in the emergency lane.  First 3 people to stop to aid assistance are two ER nurses, and a defibrillator salesman who happens to have a demo unit with him.

Not too long ago there was a story/video about a dispatcher for a medevac paramedic team had a MI at work with said paramedics in the room with their equipment watching him deteriorate.


Some of the equipment and training (like CPR) is only good for certain situations. They probably should have given him anticoagulants and sent him to the ER, though.
 
2013-04-25 02:29:06 AM

UsikFark: Some of the equipment and training (like CPR) is only good for certain situations. They probably should have given him anticoagulants and sent him to the ER, though.


Watch the video, I linked it above.

He's having an ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction - i.e. a COMPLETE blockage of his left main coronary artery. He goes into ventricular fibrillation after having a run of PVCs, for which the treatment is CPR and Defibrillation, first line.
 
2013-04-25 02:31:45 AM

UsikFark: Summoner101: Spaceman Spiffed: hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

Agreed.

Reminds me of an incident back in 2006 or so that's somewhere in the fark archives.  If I recall right, a guy has a heart attack while driving on the highway and stops in the emergency lane.  First 3 people to stop to aid assistance are two ER nurses, and a defibrillator salesman who happens to have a demo unit with him.

Not too long ago there was a story/video about a dispatcher for a medevac paramedic team had a MI at work with said paramedics in the room with their equipment watching him deteriorate.

Some of the equipment and training (like CPR) is only good for certain situations. They probably should have given him anticoagulants and sent him to the ER, though.


Are you trying to say that having an MI in the presence of trained paramedics with access to all their equipment and a fast mode of transport is only useful when you need trained paramedics with access to all their equipment and a fast mode of transport?

Uh... thanks? The only luckier place to have an MI is in the actual hospital.
 
2013-04-25 02:41:46 AM
Are we sure he wasn't just trying to steal the guy's wallet?
 
2013-04-25 02:59:39 AM
I'm sure the Nazi's weren't all terrible people on a person-by-person basis.
 
2013-04-25 03:13:59 AM
Since when is a finger in the butt a part of CPR?!
 
2013-04-25 04:06:45 AM

hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

/you're never a "former" EMT. The skill and mindset kicks in whenever something goes wrong.

FTFA:  Two passengers, one an ophthalmologist and the other a nurse, also jumped in to help as a flight attendant brought an automated external defibrillator.

Teamwork and rapid, effective CPR, combined with defibrillation, saves lives.




Isn't CPR, alone, basically useless on some?
 
2013-04-25 04:18:56 AM

StoPPeRmobile: Isn't CPR, alone, basically useless on some?


It depends. If you don't have an AED available, hands-only CPR can be lifesaving until someone with a defibrillator gets there in an adult. In a heart attack, the most common lethal arrhythmia is ventricular fibrillation. CPR keeps the myocardium perfused, which increases the chances of a successful defibrillation and restoration of a perfusing rhythm.

The real key is that CPR keeps the brain and end-organs alive until the cause of the arrest can be corrected. Some things, like hypoxia and hypovolemia, can be easily corrected, Other things, like Tamponade or Thrombosis (Heart Attack/PE) can't.
 
2013-04-25 04:43:56 AM

Summoner101: UsikFark: Summoner101: Spaceman Spiffed: hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

Agreed.

Reminds me of an incident back in 2006 or so that's somewhere in the fark archives.  If I recall right, a guy has a heart attack while driving on the highway and stops in the emergency lane.  First 3 people to stop to aid assistance are two ER nurses, and a defibrillator salesman who happens to have a demo unit with him.

Not too long ago there was a story/video about a dispatcher for a medevac paramedic team had a MI at work with said paramedics in the room with their equipment watching him deteriorate.

Some of the equipment and training (like CPR) is only good for certain situations. They probably should have given him anticoagulants and sent him to the ER, though.

Are you trying to say that having an MI in the presence of trained paramedics with access to all their equipment and a fast mode of transport is only useful when you need trained paramedics with access to all their equipment and a fast mode of transport?

Uh... thanks? The only luckier place to have an MI is in the actual hospital.


It can wait until morning, the doctors can just shock him back to life.
 
MFK
2013-04-25 07:37:08 AM
the first life the TSA has saved
 
2013-04-25 07:54:10 AM

Caradoc: I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.


Sometimes people want to be overqualified.  Government jobs are a great place for that.  They have their issues, but you don't have to justify your existence very damn day.

iheartscotch: I'm surprised the guy who received CPR isn't sueing for some reason.


She survived.  A well-meaning bystander is more likely to get sued by the victim's family if the attempt was unsuccessful.  During my CPR training I was advised to never identify myself when getting involved in an emergency.  Once the first responders arrive and take over, walk away without saying a word.  They won't ask who you are and no one else has any business knowing; giving out your name is only asking to get sued.  No one should learn these skills for glory, anyway.
 
2013-04-25 07:56:10 AM
HA HA you can't fool me. It's obviously some sort of false flag operation to improve the image of the TSA.
 
2013-04-25 08:58:28 AM

hardinparamedic: There doesn't necessarily have to be something he did wrong to have caused him to quit. Psychological trauma is a biatch, especially if he was involved in direct field work.


No, but there has to be something he did wrong to go to "work" for the TSA. He could have chosen profession with a modicum of honor, like gay porn stunt butt.
 
2013-04-25 09:02:54 AM

Caradoc: He could have chosen profession with a modicum of honor, like gay porn stunt butt.


If he chose TSA over stunt butt, then I think it's pretty clear he's a top.
 
2013-04-25 09:06:01 AM

UsikFark: hardinparamedic: US Marine Core

Semper Fib.


Is the Core where they have the zombie corpse men?
 
2013-04-25 09:08:53 AM
Total Lives Saved by TSA to Date: 1
 
2013-04-25 09:13:45 AM

FarkLordOfTheSith: Since a TSA agent was involved, did anyone check to make sure the person's wallet and other valuables were still there afterward?


Came to say this.  Leaving satisfied.
 
2013-04-25 09:57:29 AM

Caradoc: hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

/you're never a "former" EMT. The skill and mindset kicks in whenever something goes wrong.

While it's cool that he assisted in saving the guy's life, I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.


Yep. He decided protecting people and saving lives was less important and far less rewarding than airline security.
Personally I wouldnt want people to know that I'd failed that hard.
 
2013-04-25 10:07:23 AM

runescorpio: He decided protecting people and saving lives was less important and far less rewarding than airline security theatre.


FTFY. HTH. HAND.
 
2013-04-25 10:17:11 AM

Caradoc: hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

/you're never a "former" EMT. The skill and mindset kicks in whenever something goes wrong.

While it's cool that he assisted in saving the guy's life, I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.


hardinparamedic: Caradoc: While it's cool that he assisted in saving the guy's life, I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.

It could have been as simple as having something go wrong, or working a bad call and getting burned out. There doesn't necessarily have to be something he did wrong to have caused him to quit. Psychological trauma is a biatch, especially if he was involved in direct field work.


runescorpio: Caradoc: hardinparamedic: FTFA: A former federal marshal and EMT, Kennish is trained in CPR immediately began resuscitating the woman.

Talk about winning the farking lotto. If you decide to suddenly have a heart conduction fart, that's the person you want around you when you do it.

/you're never a "former" EMT. The skill and mindset kicks in whenever something goes wrong.

While it's cool that he assisted in saving the guy's life, I have to wonder just what caused him to fail at being a federal marshal and fail at being an EMT, and then sinking so far as to take a "job" with the TSA.

Yep. He decided protecting people and saving lives was less important and far less rewarding than airline security.
Personally I wouldnt want people to know that I'd failed that hard.



You guys realize there are branches of the TSA other than the screeners, right?  Not all TSA are GED screeners like the ones you interact with.  He saw the woman as she was getting off a plane.  Odds are he's a US air marshal, which were moved under TSA.  You know, one of the few TSA LEOs with arrest authority that are well respected.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Air_Marshal_Service
 
2013-04-25 10:28:36 AM

nickerj1: Odds are he's a US air marshal, which were moved under TSA.  You know, one of the few TSA LEOs with arrest authority that are well respected.


By whom?

If he were a FAM, they'd have mentioned that. They did mention "former" marshal, and that he's an "11-year veteran of the TSA."

You know what that tells us? Not only does he lack anything resembling honor, ethics, or marketable skills, he appears to be happy to work for the TSA.
 
2013-04-25 10:57:16 AM

Caradoc: nickerj1: Odds are he's a US air marshal, which were moved under TSA.  You know, one of the few TSA LEOs with arrest authority that are well respected.

By whom?

If he were a FAM, they'd have mentioned that. They did mention "former" marshal, and that he's an "11-year veteran of the TSA."

You know what that tells us? Not only does he lack anything resembling honor, ethics, or marketable skills, he appears to be happy to work for the TSA.


Federal marshal would imply the USMS, not a FAM, in my opinion.  And 11 year veteran would indicate more that he's some type of manager, especially with his experience. It also means he joined or was assigned right after the TSA was created.  Which means he could have joined TSA for an emotional reason.  Or perhaps he was a FAM before TSA was created, and when it was created he was reassigned to it.  And at some point inbetween has been promoted to a more managerial role.
 
2013-04-25 11:05:12 AM

nickerj1: Federal marshal would imply the USMS, not a FAM, in my opinion.  And 11 year veteran would indicate more that he's some type of manager, especially with his experience. It also means he joined or was assigned right after the TSA was created.  Which means he could have joined TSA for an emotional reason.  Or perhaps he was a FAM before TSA was created, and when it was created he was reassigned to it.  And at some point inbetween has been promoted to a more managerial role.


You seem to be rather insistent that this guy is somehow more than they've painted him to be.

First you seem to want to claim he's a FAM, then you seem to want to claim he's a manager. Neither was mentioned in the article, and given the TSA's propensity to exaggerate the fark out of things that they believe might make their image improve I cannot help but think that they would have mentioned those things.

Instead, we have a 36-year-old who is an 11-year "veteran" of the TSA, who they claim was once a Federal Marshal, and was also once an EMT.

That means he would have been a Federal Marshal *and* and EMT before his 25th birthday. I call shenanigans.

Also...

"Kennish demonstrated amazing personal courage and skill in emergency response," said Don Drummer, TSA's federal security director for the airport. "In all likelihood, Rob's decisive actions saved this passenger's life."

I had no idea that the airport FSD was medically qualified to make such a claim.
 
2013-04-25 12:04:26 PM

hardinparamedic: StoPPeRmobile: Isn't CPR, alone, basically useless on some?

It depends. If you don't have an AED available, hands-only CPR can be lifesaving until someone with a defibrillator gets there in an adult. In a heart attack, the most common lethal arrhythmia is ventricular fibrillation. CPR keeps the myocardium perfused, which increases the chances of a successful defibrillation and restoration of a perfusing rhythm.

The real key is that CPR keeps the brain and end-organs alive until the cause of the arrest can be corrected. Some things, like hypoxia and hypovolemia, can be easily corrected, Other things, like Tamponade or Thrombosis (Heart Attack/PE) can't.




Thanks for the info.
 
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