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(Salon)   Psychologist says that people believe in conspiracy theories so they can "have a sense of control." Of course that's what they want you to believe   (salon.com) divider line 36
    More: PSA, University of Western Australia, political lines  
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2939 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Apr 2013 at 12:17 AM (51 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-25 01:13:48 AM
4 votes:
Conspiracy theorists make a fundamental mistake in assuming that power needs to hide itself from an intellectually lazy public.

There's really no need to conceal misdeeds from people who are too stupid and deferential to care in the first place.
2013-04-25 12:58:33 AM
4 votes:
What's a more entertaining perspective on life?

1. I'm a completely unremarkable member of the human race; an actor in nature's grand game of chance where a few of us hit it big, but most of us toil in obscurity.

Or

2. I'm among the privileged few who are aware of the sinister forces of power controlling everything. My life may suck, but I can blame the Illuminati/Rothschild/Bilderberger alliance for keeping me from reaching my full potential. I'll fight the New World Order till my dying breath!
2013-04-25 01:57:41 AM
2 votes:

J. Frank Parnell: When i see someone resort to namecalling and mockery it doesn't make me think they're very intelligent, or are capable of being objectively rational.


when I see someone ignore all evidence that is contrary to their pet theory or justify it with the tired line of "I'm just asking questions" it doesn't make me think they're very intelligent, or are capable of being objectively rational. especially when they do it over and over and over again. Calling Alex Jones an idiot doesn't make his statements in anyway true or give it more validity. and there is more evidence to him being an idiot than thee is to any of his theories.

Not all arguments have merit.
2013-04-25 01:00:16 AM
2 votes:
there is also the desire to believe that someone, somewhere, actually knows what they are doing
2013-04-25 12:54:45 AM
2 votes:
CONSPIRACY FACT: 19 hijackers armed with box cutters directed by OBL commandeered planes and brought down WTC 1, 2, 7 and damaged the Pentagon.

CONSPIRACY THEORY: That any factor other than the above may have been involved.

CONSPIRACY FACT: That Saddam Hussein was deeply involved with Al-Qaeda ,and helped orchestrate 9-11. He also had WMD's and could "strike Israel" in as little as 40 minutes.

CONSPIRACY THEORY: Anything other than the above.


/Are you a "Conspiracy Theorist"?
2013-04-25 12:50:07 AM
2 votes:
I've always thought that things do not happen "for a reason" and there is no such thing as fate or karma.  The universe is a cold, unfeeling place ("feelings" after all are just a series of chemical reactions in biological structures) and it is only by sheer accident that life in general and you in particular exist and survive.  I also think that after death there is literally nothing, but the brain has a difficult time imagining its own non-existence.

The fact that I find this notion unappealing has always seemed to me an indication that it is likely to be true.
2013-04-25 12:37:12 AM
2 votes:
I'll also add that anyone who mocks conspiracy theorists should have their wife cheat on them with their best friend for years. Weaving an elaborate web of lies and having thousands of covert bangings, right under their nose. It will be all the more easier because whenever they begin to suspect something, they'll stop themselves because they don't want to be a 'crazy' conspiracy theorist.
2013-04-25 12:33:51 AM
2 votes:
It's obvious but bears repeating... not all conspiracy theories are of equal value, but with the internet, even the most worthless and moronic idea gets play.
2013-04-25 12:25:11 AM
2 votes:

jaylectricity: We've found out and arrested conspirators in this country. It's not like conspirators are unicorns or anything.


Human history is absolutely rife with conspiracies. This recent notion being forced on the public that you have to be crazy to believe they happen is rather, suspicious.
2013-04-25 12:23:51 AM
2 votes:
The reason people beleive conspiracy theories is because they have caught the govt and media lieing to them so many times.
2013-04-24 09:08:46 PM
2 votes:

BarkingUnicorn: All you really need to be in control is an ignore list.


Ignore doesn't work when people in real life making real decisions believe this crap.
2013-04-25 10:59:42 PM
1 votes:

log_jammin: The Repeated Meme: Everything that was discovered to be a conspiracy started out as a conspiracy theory.

Everything that was discovered about MK-ULTRA? or every conspiracy in general?

either way I'm still not sure what your point is. Since there was a rumor about the CIA giving people LSD and testing if mind control was possible, and it later turned out that some of those rumors were true, then all conspiracy theories have merit and the idea that lizard people control the government should be given equal weight with the idea that the CIA does disinformation campaigns? Is that what you're trying to say?



No, not at all. The point I was trying to make was that if you mention something like MK-ULTRA then people will jump to saying you must believe in lizard people, faked moon landings, etc, which of course is reductio ad absurdum.

Just because some people can't engage in critical thought and slot information to suit their narrative doesn't mean people in positions of power don't conspire and get away with it.
2013-04-25 11:25:36 AM
1 votes:

Amos Quito: log_jammin: TappingTheVein: Amos Quitobelieves that JFK's assassination was a jewish conspiracy.

why does that not surprise me.


Because you didn't bother to click the link and find out that TappingTheVein was lying, (as usual)?


Oh I clicked the link alright. You calling his comment a lie is about as Orwellian as it gets.
2013-04-25 06:06:06 AM
1 votes:
if conspiracy theorists are mentally ill, you must concede that religious people are as well...

and for that matter anyone who believes in anything.

because by definition belief is not fact...

but i dare you to go through life without believing anything...
2013-04-25 01:57:37 AM
1 votes:

bootmoop: log_jammin: bootmoop: There are several radar accounts and visual citings of UFO's for instance but there is never going to be any legitimate inquiry using a scientific approach

I understand what you're saying, but there absolutely is legitimate inquiry into those events. It's just that there is no evidence to conclude that anything "alien" caused them.

I'm still unsure that if someone wrote their doctoral thesis considering it and found it to be negative conclusion that they still wouldn't be laughed out of their defense for even wanting to look.


No...it's that a doctoral thesis considering the existence of UFOs as genuinely alien which comes up negative is likely to be entitled "An Inquiry into radar anomalies over the past five decades and possible causes, including extraterrestrial sources"--which is an entirely legitimate thesis and could have entirely legitimate results. However, such a thesis wouldn't be proceeding from the belief that UFOs are space aliens, it would be proceeding from the question "What caused these unusual radar anomalies?" and go from there. This means that ultimately the result would be either Not Alien or at best Undetermined...which is what those anomalies have always been over the decades.

A thesis which was titled "Unmasking the government coverups behind radar anomalies which are really space aliens" would probably be laughed at; not because of its subject necessarily (although it might be) but because it's proceeding from the conclusion: That there are space aliens and the radar signatures are proof of them, which the government is covering up. If that's what you're looking for, that's what you'll find; but it won't be a scientific study. Scientists won't like it, but the public will eat it up with a spoon.
2013-04-25 01:52:12 AM
1 votes:
ITT: People who don't know the difference between a "conspiracy", and a "conspiracy theory".
2013-04-25 01:42:01 AM
1 votes:
img41.imageshack.us

Wow, Amos. I'm in awe of the speed in which you filled this thread with shiat.

Perhaps the only redeeming factor you have is that I know you don't believe half the stuff you type, since you contradict yourself from thread to thread just to troll.

But, just for kicks.

Amos Quito: Do YOU believe that Saddam was involved in 9-11?

That he had WMD's?

That he could "Strike Israel in 40 minutes, hardinparamedic?


Do you believe everything that BushCo told us as we went to war with Iraq?

Because if not, you're a reptilian believing "Conspiracy Theorist" - armed with band-aids.


Demonstrable Fact: The intelligence that supported the Invasion of Iraq, and the nationalistic use of the media to beat the drums of war were flawed, and that at best, Bush was mislead by senior advisors, and at worse blatently lied about the Casus Beli.

Blatant Derp with no proof or evidence: The Government did 9/11 because of the above.

One of these things is not like the other, Amos. Try harder.

Amos Quito: Anyone who doesn't blindly believe that the Reichstag Fire  was caused by Communist Jews deserves to be gassed!


Just because Hitler blew up the Reichstag does not mean that the Government used "microthermite" to blow up the Twin Towers, or that JFK was shot by Gray Aliens.

That's the point you seem to miss. Somehow, despite the astounding and overwhelming incompetence and failure to keep even the most minute conspiracy secret due to, at the very least, the human factor involved with keeping a large conspiracy covered up, things like the JFK assassination, the 9/11 Attacks, and FEMA Concentration Camps are able to be kept completely secret and off the books save for the few "clever" enough to see the hidden truth in our world.
2013-04-25 01:33:01 AM
1 votes:

MrBallou: This is a false flag operation. It says Salon, but American Thinker is really behind it. Need proof?

FTFA - "I don't think there is a systematic association between political views and the propensity to believe in conspiracy theories. There are some studies that suggest people on the political left are inclined to it, and there are some that suggest people on the right are. But it's always a weak association. "


People on the right tend to be less trustful of government, thus they have more reason to believe the government is doing something nefarious.

And when people become less trustful of the government the government becomes less trustful of the people and begins hiding more things. It's a vicious cycle. Described quite well in the forward to this:

images.betterworldbooks.com
2013-04-25 01:31:03 AM
1 votes:

hardinparamedic: J. Frank Parnell: Human history is absolutely rife with conspiracies. This recent notion being forced on the public that you have to be crazy to believe they happen is rather, suspicious.

And this is what is known as the vindication of all kooks corollary to the theory of crank magnetism.

Just because some idiot proposed Operation Northwood doesn't mean it happened. Just because Tuskegee occurred does not mean that the Government perpetrated the 9/11 attacks. Just because Iran-Contra happened, does not mean that the Reptilian Overlords are using vaccinations to cause your precious little snowflake to have autism and rambunctious behavior.


People like conspiracy theories not just because it gives them personally control, I think, but because it puts order on the larger face of chaos: it makes it seem like SOMEONE is in control, even if that "someone" is an evil sinister force. The best simple example is TWA 800, when everyone was claiming it was a missile fired from a sub that was being covered up by the Navy. Because which is more reassuring: That it was a deliberately fired missile, or just a random design flaw that could exist in any airplane (as the NTSB report later determined)?

And most large-scale conspiracy theories are like that. People would rather think our government was SO POWERFUL (if evil) that they could manage to coordinate the 9/11 attacks, than that 19 guys funded by a small-scale terrorist group could do it. The former says "we are in control!" and the latter says "things are random". People hate randomness like nature abhors a vacuum.
2013-04-25 01:13:22 AM
1 votes:

J. Frank Parnell: how people, probably like yourself, dismiss them as possibilities because they're conspiracies


people dismiss them as conspiracies because there is no evidence to back them.

People who believe in conspiracies start with a conclusion and look for things to back that conclusion. They don't go where the evidence takes them.
2013-04-25 01:03:41 AM
1 votes:
If only we had some kind of special sunglasses that would let us see what was really going on in the world around us.

www.jnack.com
2013-04-25 12:57:13 AM
1 votes:

hardinparamedic: So your response to it being pointed out that you're so full of crap it's dripping from your ears is to equate your wife cheating on you with, say, 9-11 Trutherism?


i3.kym-cdn.com

Putting your cognitive dissonance aside, this isn't about any particular conspiracy. Just how people, probably like yourself, dismiss them as possibilities because they're conspiracies, as if such things never happen.
2013-04-25 12:56:52 AM
1 votes:
It's funny that this popped up today of all days. I was trolling around on youtube watching those nutty videos about how Obama is a time traveling martian and I saw the name Dr. Courtney Brown listed in some crap talk radio video. Looking over, I thought to myself, "It simply can't be! That was my weird ass professor on stochastic modeling." I kept pulling the sweater and found this gem:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaLMnUybkVA

So it turns out my professor is ALSO the "leading researcher in the field of remote viewing." I thought to myself, "Noooo. Surely a rigorous research institute wouldn't hire some fraud like this." It turns out he runs this money making scheme teaching people to be psychics under the ruse of "scientifically" predicting the future. From what I could make of it, he seems to gather people up and lead them toward conclusions. The viewer is told to make some statement about what a certain place looks like in the future or past. Rinse and repeat until you have a ton of random statements about events. Then my former professor sifts through the predictions and finds ones that are "accurate" in so far as that they got some details in their made up timeline correct. He then uses the claims that they made about the future/past as predictions and calls this evidence that remote viewing is real.

The crazy is strong these days, and it freaks me out that so many people can delude themselves to nonsense so quickly.
2013-04-25 12:52:20 AM
1 votes:
I know the good doctor said conspiracy theory believers are spread across intelligence levels, but it's been my observation that people who believe in conspiracy theories tend to think they're smarter than everyone else. All of us dummies fall for the official story, but Mr. Inside Info knows the real story. You weren't dumb enough to believe the Boston bombers were throwing explosive out of their vehicle, were you? Ha Ha, you're so gullible. I figured they liked it because they weren't so smart but it made them feel smart.
2013-04-25 12:44:46 AM
1 votes:
I think a distinction should be drawn between healthy skepticism and tin foil hat wearing.

And farking clinical psychologists.  Yeah, the U.S. produce a lot of college graduates, but most of them have worthless degrees.  We probably award more psychology degrees than the rest of the world combined and this is how we end up wit research like this.  Meanwhile, the Chinese are kicking our ass in STEM.  Go to any university and poll the white students and Asian students about what their major is.  I think you will see a pretty clear distinction..
2013-04-25 12:41:42 AM
1 votes:
If you've been involved in power systems for any decent length of time, you learn two things:

1) People are almost always plotting something in secret, and
2) Random, unpredictable shiat happens from time to time and for no good reason
2013-04-25 12:28:33 AM
1 votes:
When a former president of the United States claims he can't recall where he was when JFK was killed, that isn't a conspiracy theory. That's just plain scary.

I've said too much....
2013-04-25 12:26:29 AM
1 votes:
People are stupid and will believe anything, either because they want it to be true or they are afraid that it might be true. -- Wizards First Rule

But I do think its funny that conspiracies only became "crazy" on or around January 20th 2009.
2013-04-25 12:25:26 AM
1 votes:
It's on Salon.com is it really worth reading?
2013-04-24 11:22:58 PM
1 votes:
We've found out and arrested conspirators in this country. It's not like conspirators are unicorns or anything.
2013-04-24 10:14:39 PM
1 votes:
The halls of corporate and political power are generally incorruptible, guileless and represented to the public by the media in a forthright fashion. People who question it are mentally ill.
2013-04-24 09:51:51 PM
1 votes:

Fano: What's interesting to me is the vortex of crazy when conspiracy nuts get together. Listening to the old Art Bell show was amazing, because some episodes would sound like the time Bart had everyone together and talks about how the Rand Corporation, in conjunction with the saucer people and the reverse vampires..." I mean to say that among the conspiracy nuts there seemed to be an unspoken rule not to shiat on other conspiracies, just to wad them all together, even the mutually contradictory ones. It's amazing the things people can convince themselves to believe. Which monarch in Wonderland was the one that could hold multiple contradictory thoughts at once? Like that.


It's still hilarious to listen to, especially when George Norrie takes the head. I sometimes have to remind myself I'm not listening to the Onion.

Don't judge me. In some of the areas I transport in, we have two and a half hour one way drives. North Mississippi has an abundance of AM radio and Country FM stations. Since I hate the later, the former tend to amuse me since my boss won't let us install a Sirius in the ground trucks.
2013-04-24 09:47:07 PM
1 votes:

hardinparamedic: Fano: That's the kind of limited thinking I expect out of sheeple.

WAKE UP SHEEPLE!

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE, YOU BASTARD!!!!

[www.tragnark.com image 350x217]

Or, it could be the fact that we've evolved to have conspiratorial, irrational beliefs and religious fantasies as part of our brain's development. You're never going to take those out of human society unless you remove the temporal lobe at birth in every person, or we evolve to a different neurological structure.

MrBallou: This is a false flag operation. It says Salon, but American Thinker is really behind it. Need proof?

FTFA - "I don't think there is a systematic association between political views and the propensity to believe in conspiracy theories. There are some studies that suggest people on the political left are inclined to it, and there are some that suggest people on the right are. But it's always a weak association. "

Politics are only involved in so far as what general theme of derp one is willing to believe. Those on the right are more willing to see evil communists or globalists, and stick to strong nationalistic theories, while those on the left are the ones you most commonly see being involved in things like 9/11 Trutherism, and Boston Bombing derp. Those on the right also are most common to adhere to racial superiority theories.

And then you have some themes that are apolitical, like anti-vaccination or anti-medicine.


I agree to all this. And the article makes plenty of sense to me too. Human minds seem configured to find patterns where there are none. I cannot award partisan points because as you say, the only thing that varies is the flavor of the conspiracy. Intelligence doesn't matter too much because the smarter folks that believe in conspiracies just use more sophisticated and subtle pattern recognition. I know that I've talked to what I consider well-educated people that, when you get them on the "right subject," start saying things like "the Zionists and the Bilderbergers meet regularly to develop world policy, you know that, right?"

I think it is a reaction to make sense of a senseless world. What's sanity, anyway? A one trick pony. All it gives you is rational thought. But when you're good and crazy, woohooHOO, the sky's the limit. Not to say that folks that believe in conspiracies are necessarily crazy.

What's interesting to me is the vortex of crazy when conspiracy nuts get together. Listening to the old Art Bell show was amazing, because some episodes would sound like the time Bart had everyone together and talks about how the Rand Corporation, in conjunction with the saucer people and the reverse vampires..." I mean to say that among the conspiracy nuts there seemed to be an unspoken rule not to shiat on other conspiracies, just to wad them all together, even the mutually contradictory ones. It's amazing the things people can convince themselves to believe. Which monarch in Wonderland was the one that could hold multiple contradictory thoughts at once? Like that.
2013-04-24 09:25:43 PM
1 votes:
I don't think there is a systematic association between political views and the propensity to believe in conspiracy theories. There are some studies that suggest people on the political left are inclined to it, and there are some that suggest people on the right are. But it's always a weak association. There are some theories that appeal to only one side, however. For example, the idea that 9/11 was an inside job was fairly common among Democrats in the early part of the 2000s, and very few Republicans believed it at the time. But conversely, the idea that the U.N. is trying to create a world government is predominantly held by people on the right, but not at all by people on the political left. So it really doesn't depend on politics.

Conspiracy theory websites have all basically bled into each other over the last 10 years, so certain theories have essentially become "canon" to everyone who follows them in general.   It's gotten to the point that every single horrible incident in the world from school shootings (mind control/false flag) to earthquakes (HAARP) are now immediately accepted into the larger narrative the moment they hit the news.

What seems to be happening though is the conspiracy theorist websites say conclusively that the attack was a deliberate move by a shadowy cabal somewhere, but their actual motives are usually part of a broad movement that is impossible to pin down exactly.  So the Boston bombing was an attack to begin to start getting a gun crack down to disarm everyone, but the actual details of what the one world government that takes over will be like are vague.  At best, they just make it sound like a post-Apocalyptic waste land.  That leaves the ultimate slant of the shadowy group up for interpretation, because the conspiracy theory websites only vaguely go into detail about the people running the show in their world or what they truly want other than just control.  Conservatives will think that the UN is going to conquer the world and some Biblical Villain will rule it, while Liberals think that there is some group of Bush Cabinet members plotting to set up a bunch of perpetual wars 1984 style.

Then all of it shows up on central places like Alex Jones, which is followed by both sides.  I know it's a little more right leaning now, but plenty of my fellow libs were taking that shiat seriously when Bush was in office.  Since the true final motives are often open to interpretation, the different sides just fill in the rest of the narrative along their own political bent.  That is my take on how it actually works in practice.

/I occasionally read them out of curiosity - lately it has mainly been to try to follow laws passed by Middle American legislatures - and that seems to be how it works
2013-04-24 09:06:30 PM
1 votes:

Fano: That's the kind of limited thinking I expect out of sheeple.

WAKE UP SHEEPLE!


WHAT HAVE YOU DONE, YOU BASTARD!!!!

www.tragnark.com

Or, it could be the fact that we've evolved to have conspiratorial, irrational beliefs and religious fantasies as part of our brain's development. You're never going to take those out of human society unless you remove the temporal lobe at birth in every person, or we evolve to a different neurological structure.

MrBallou: This is a false flag operation. It says Salon, but American Thinker is really behind it. Need proof?

FTFA - "I don't think there is a systematic association between political views and the propensity to believe in conspiracy theories. There are some studies that suggest people on the political left are inclined to it, and there are some that suggest people on the right are. But it's always a weak association. "


Politics are only involved in so far as what general theme of derp one is willing to believe. Those on the right are more willing to see evil communists or globalists, and stick to strong nationalistic theories, while those on the left are the ones you most commonly see being involved in things like 9/11 Trutherism, and Boston Bombing derp. Those on the right also are most common to adhere to racial superiority theories.

And then you have some themes that are apolitical, like anti-vaccination or anti-medicine.
2013-04-24 06:57:26 PM
1 votes:
It's a coping mechanism
 
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