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(New Jersey 101.5)   Desperate doctoral student offers laptop thief $1,000 for return of thesis folder containing five years worth of research   (nj1015.com) divider line 267
    More: Sad, Rutgers University, students  
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9846 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Apr 2013 at 7:38 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



267 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-04-24 06:02:20 PM  
always back up your research!!

Watched a guy try to fight his way into a burning building to try to save his research.
 
2013-04-24 06:03:10 PM  
i780.photobucket.com
 
2013-04-24 06:04:03 PM  
dubsism.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-04-24 06:05:00 PM  
Given how far storage has come down in thew last few years, I have zero sympathy for anyone who doesn't back up their $#!+ at  least once.
 
2013-04-24 06:12:41 PM  
Back it up!

Witnessed the aftermath of a woman who was robbed for her backpack but she fought tooth and nail for a notebook within it.
The result was bad.
 
2013-04-24 06:24:40 PM  
It's called Dropbox.  It's free.  Look into it.

/I lost twenty pages of my master's thesis in 1990.  Even THEN I felt stupid that it wasn't on multiple floppies.
 
2013-04-24 06:26:44 PM  
As someone currently working on a dissertation, this gives me the shivers.  Just backed up my data twice.
 
2013-04-24 06:27:27 PM  

Nezorf: Back it up!

Witnessed the aftermath of a woman who was robbed for her backpack but she fought tooth and nail for a notebook within it.
The result was bad.


Excuse me, the movies and news reports have made it very clear that the plucky lady, be she young or old, who stands up and fights a mugger/robber/whatever always wins.
 
2013-04-24 07:09:28 PM  
Well, now every future employer knows how well he plans for future contingencies.
 
2013-04-24 07:24:18 PM  

nmrsnr: Well, now every future employer knows how well he plans for future contingencies.


That too.  I see "20-year lab tech" in this person's future.  Maybe even "person who pours the chemicals in the vat at the plant" if they fail that hard.
 
2013-04-24 07:28:32 PM  
Back up your important things. Dumbass.
 
2013-04-24 07:30:19 PM  
I would have done the same 5 years into my dissertation research. Except that I kept backups of writing and source material on CD-R. Because I'm not a farking idiot.

/Gotta 1 TB backup drive @ work and a 1.5 TB backup drive @ home
 
2013-04-24 07:33:38 PM  
Holy crap google is getting bad. There is a classic out there if a guy on the phone with tech support about his research. Used to find it in a few searchable words, all ads now.
 
2013-04-24 07:34:50 PM  

SpikeStrip: [i780.photobucket.com image 226x223]


Is there a way we can work "Blac Vagina Finda" into the thread?

Because if that song isn't spot on in the vast majority of situations I find myself continually in, I don't know what is.
 
2013-04-24 07:41:00 PM  
This link has inspired me to back up my music again. I've loaded more than 1,000 songs onto itunes since the last time.
 
2013-04-24 07:41:07 PM  
If you're not smart enough to back up your research, chances are you shouldn't be doing research.
 
2013-04-24 07:42:07 PM  
You do sort of wonder if this is just a modern update of "The dog ate my homework"
 
2013-04-24 07:43:58 PM  
Copy on laptop, copy on flash drive, copy on desktop at work, save & send copies of drafts sent to work email.

I do really feel bad for her, though.  The good news is she gets to be a graduate student for a little bit longer.  Party on.
 
2013-04-24 07:44:16 PM  
MaxxLarge: Given how far storage has come down in thew last few years, I have zero sympathy for anyone who doesn't back up their $#!+ at least once.

I'm building an external storage box in anticipation of getting a full frame camera (going from an 8 megapixel SLR to a 21 megapixel SLR).

And ... I need more damned space.

// about to put western digital back into the red

// this guy is lucky it just got stolen, vs getting dropped on train tracks and run over by a train or something. There's at least some small inkling of a chance that he could get the data back from the thief ... BUT you can't bribe a train!
 
2013-04-24 07:44:35 PM  
right. i had multiple backups of all my crap and got pissed if i even lost one of them. while living in the ghetto a crack addict / meth head whatever stole one'a my cd binders of my data dvds - - he was probably wondering why 'marker group 5' etc. sounded like a bunch of noise.

/ghetto 909/951
//crack heads
///meth heads
////ugh
 
2013-04-24 07:45:12 PM  
I am extremely disorganized and careless, but I always maintained at least two separate copies of any important academic work on two separate devices.

In fact, I typically had multiple copies of academic work across multiple devices because of my disorganization.
 
2013-04-24 07:45:27 PM  
Wasn't this the plot of a movie awhile back?
 
2013-04-24 07:45:48 PM  
I'm holding out for $5000, then I'll give it back.
 
2013-04-24 07:45:55 PM  
Exactly. PhD in chemistry, preschool backup skills.

That's what happens when you grow up in the era of reliable hard drives. Unlike us old fogies who grew up listening to the grind of the motors of a 5.25" floppy (which we had 3 back ups of each).

Chunk chunk bbbbbrrrrraaaaaappppp chunk chunk brrrrrrraaaaaappppp.... the sound of backup #3 of thesis work on floppy drive. Oh well, switch to copy number 2, buy another $10 5.25" floppy and make that the new back up disk.
 
2013-04-24 07:46:21 PM  
Dropbox
Github
Farking Dropbox
Skydrive
Google Docs
A TB backup drive.
Hell, if it's THAT important, AWS S3.

/Or my personal favorite, A local git repo contained in a dropbox.  Perfect backup across multiple machines coupled with local revision history so you can blow away 6 hours of fail in 3 seconds.
 
2013-04-24 07:46:34 PM  
When I worked tech support for a computer company, every 'finals' season I would get at least one call, always from a young woman, whose hard drive had crashed and they lost their critical docs.  Every bloody time, they had zero backups.  Going forward, every time I talked to a parent who mentioned buying the computer for their college bound child, or to a kid in college, I told them to go out, buy a thumb drive, put it on their key chain, and keep backups of their important stuff on it.

When I actually did work at a college, most of the students I worked with had thumb drives.  The smart ones also emailed themselves their really critical docs so they'd be stored on-line.

And of course, now there's Dropbox and other cloud services.

/but wait, what if I really want to put everything important to me on one small box that can be easily stolen or destroyed?
 
2013-04-24 07:46:58 PM  
Sad tag is for the fact that a doctoral student is too stupid to back up important research, I presume.
 
2013-04-24 07:47:21 PM  

amquelbettamin: I'm holding out for $5000, then I'll give it back.


texdent: Wasn't this the plot of a movie awhile back?


keanu reeves in "DUDE, YOU STOLE MY DATA.".
rated D for dumb.
 
2013-04-24 07:48:04 PM  

you_idiot: Exactly. PhD in chemistry, preschool backup skills.

That's what happens when you grow up in the era of reliable hard drives. Unlike us old fogies who grew up listening to the grind of the motors of a 5.25" floppy (which we had 3 back ups of each).

Chunk chunk bbbbbrrrrraaaaaappppp chunk chunk brrrrrrraaaaaappppp.... the sound of backup #3 of thesis work on floppy drive. Oh well, switch to copy number 2, buy another $10 5.25" floppy and make that the new back up disk.


I miss that sound. I have no idea why.
 
2013-04-24 07:48:30 PM  

dahmers love zombie: It's called Dropbox.  It's free.  Look into it.

/I lost twenty pages of my master's thesis in 1990.  Even THEN I felt stupid that it wasn't on multiple floppies.


Cloud storage is obviously better than nothing, but if you're backing up five years worth of data it's really not sufficient. These services don't guarantee that your data is going to stick around, nor is there protection if you lose your password or accidentally delete the data. What do you think happens if you have a local folder synced to Dropbox and the contents of that folder are deleted or corrupted?

If I had five years of my life in data, I would do 2 out of 3 of these at a minimum:
1. Backup on a DVD stored in a safe place.
2. Backup on a hard drive or flash drive stored in a different safe place.
3. Backup on a server with an account you don't use for anything else.

Refresh each of these regularly.
 
2013-04-24 07:48:37 PM  

He didn't have a backup of his five year thesis? I have backup of all my files, including the porn.


imageshack.us

 
2013-04-24 07:49:16 PM  
into the red

Err, into the black.

// brainfart since I'm looking at WD Red drives :P
 
2013-04-24 07:49:46 PM  
You spend 5 years doing the shiat and not back it up? You're not worthy of a PhD in Social Science.
 
2013-04-24 07:50:04 PM  

Nezorf: Back it up!

Witnessed the aftermath of a woman who was robbed for her backpack but she fought tooth and nail for a notebook within it.
The result was bad.


Witnessed it? Did you mabey think of helping out? Atleast calling the cops? What did you do point and laugh?
 
2013-04-24 07:50:38 PM  
Always have at least two copies, on different computers. And one hard copy, even if it's not current.

This is very sad; but also very very avoidable. I made the mistake once of erasing everything off a flash drive that--gulp!--had the only copy (I thought) of an article I wrote for my law journal; but it was still in existence on an old hard drive I still had. I never ever delete anything anymore unless I have a hard copy.
 
2013-04-24 07:51:05 PM  
Use a USB drive....they're cheap and easy to carry.

....or copy your stuff onto Google Drive. The first 5gb is free, 30gb is about $3/month, 100gb is about $5/month.

...or use Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, etc, etc to store your stuff. Your PC or tablet just isn't good enough anymore.
 
2013-04-24 07:51:15 PM  
I submitted this with a better headline, but it had the [DUMBASS] tag.

/also, isn't the fact that she's still working on her doctorate 5 yrs in a sign that she's not the sharpest knife in the drawer
 
2013-04-24 07:51:50 PM  
I'm gonna call shenanigans.  This dude hasn't been working on his thesis, and found a great(retarded) excuse for why he doesn't have it done.

/no backups? really?
//really!?
 
2013-04-24 07:52:27 PM  
Let's see...stress...anxiety...plus $1,000.

And Dropbox is...free.

As in "no money at all."

Zero dollars.

So, getting a doctorate, huh? Or, maybe getting a doctorate, if you can locate your irreplaceable research.

You must be pretty smart.
 
2013-04-24 07:53:05 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: always back up your research!!

Watched a guy try to fight his way into a burning building to try to save his research.


my school offers a cloud account to all students... NO excuse to not back up your shiat!
 
2013-04-24 07:54:33 PM  
Not exactly PhD material.

/Sadly, a lot of PhDs aren't.
//Says the snarky physics student.
 
2013-04-24 07:54:37 PM  
I hope he gets it back.
 
2013-04-24 07:54:38 PM  
I back my stuff up on 4 separate drives. Plus all the important info is also on dropbox, other cloud solutions. Not hard these days. Hope they get back their laptop.
 
2013-04-24 07:55:20 PM  
And he'll pay the reward any way the thief desires.
 
2013-04-24 07:55:50 PM  

teenage mutant ninja rapist: Nezorf: Back it up!

Witnessed the aftermath of a woman who was robbed for her backpack but she fought tooth and nail for a notebook within it.
The result was bad.

Witnessed it? Did you mabey think of helping out? Atleast calling the cops? What did you do point and laugh?


Well, if he had a functioning time machine so that while he was "witness[ing] the aftermath" (kinda means that he was there... after...) he coulda done something to prevent it, I think I'd rather he use it to go stop something more important.

Like KFC introducing that abomination of a sandwich.
 
2013-04-24 07:56:10 PM  

Red Shirt Blues: you_idiot: Exactly. PhD in chemistry, preschool backup skills.

That's what happens when you grow up in the era of reliable hard drives. Unlike us old fogies who grew up listening to the grind of the motors of a 5.25" floppy (which we had 3 back ups of each).

Chunk chunk bbbbbrrrrraaaaaappppp chunk chunk brrrrrrraaaaaappppp.... the sound of backup #3 of thesis work on floppy drive. Oh well, switch to copy number 2, buy another $10 5.25" floppy and make that the new back up disk.

I miss that sound. I have no idea why.


Then my friend, feast yourself upon the joy that is 'floppy music', here's an article with 8 hilarious ones:
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/8-floppy-disk-drive-music-videos/

The main theme kicking in for 'what is love' causes LOL.
 
2013-04-24 07:56:20 PM  
A few years back when I built this machine, I thought I had tons of space.

lordargent.com

But nope

lordargent.com
// I've done some repartitioning as well, but the takeaway is, look at how much longer the bars are in general.
 
2013-04-24 07:56:21 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: always back up your research!!

Watched a guy try to fight his way into a burning building to try to save his research.


At Michigan, long before computers, the economics department burned down.  They had to call in extra cops from Ypsilanti to help deal with the grad students and professors trying to swarm into the building for their papers.  Apparently the first thing the the department did after it rebuilt itself was buy a mimeograph machine and set up a system for having copies of your work stored elsewhere.
 
2013-04-24 07:57:01 PM  
A dullard who isn't smart enough to back up their hard drive.

Dumbfark.

You can't fix stupid
 
2013-04-24 07:57:45 PM  
I got bailed out once before I was a regular backup person. I sent in my comps exam (which for us was a full NIH grant proposal and presentation) and then went to a conference. We were using the computer against the desk/bed back and forth and it ended up getting over heated and ruined a fair number of files. I was lucky that my committee had the emails and could send them back to me. I lost the articles but could find them again using my ref page.
 
2013-04-24 07:58:55 PM  
It's vaguely possible that this is a setup, hoping that if someone contacts him, however they do so they'll be stupid enough to give enough information to catch him.

I'm thinking like 0.1 %.  But maybe.  Mostly likely just the idiot everyone thinks.
 
2013-04-24 07:59:41 PM  
I don't know. I'm not sure I buy this story. Are we all really going to believe that "His dog ate his homework". That five years worth of data was on ONE computer? That he never emailed parts of his thesis to anyone?
 
2013-04-24 08:00:35 PM  
I'm finding it really hard to be judgmental here, because I've been in situations where backups were just not practical. Before cloud storage and USB 3.0, I worked with enormous files that didn't really lend themselves to being backed up easily. I also once had sensitive data that could only be stored on a specific laptop that had to be kept at a specific (though not impervious) location. shiat happens.
 
2013-04-24 08:01:32 PM  
Yes, it's sad. Yes, he's an idiot for not having offsite backups. Yes, fark you for reporting on Reddit stories.
 
2013-04-24 08:05:21 PM  
When I finished my chemistry thesis about a year and a half ago, I had a backup on my internal drive, my external, dropbox, gmail, and I think a flash drive.  There was no way that I was going to lose that data short of a nuclear war and that point it wouldn't matter. Yes there is a ton of data (NMR, UV/Vis, MS, XRD, TGA, etc...) but the few hours it take to back it up you save yourself from losing 5 years of work and a chunk of your sanity.

In short she was dumb for not doing it, but I do feel bad for her because I remember the hell that was grad school.

/Still, I think she was an idiot.
 
2013-04-24 08:06:13 PM  
owlie: I'm finding it really hard to be judgmental here, because I've been in situations where backups were just not practical. Before cloud storage and USB 3.0, I worked with enormous files that didn't really lend themselves to being backed up easily.

But this is a guy working on a thesis, in the year 2013 where we have cloud storage and fire wire and the like, and his files are not likely to be enormous or require secure storage.

And he didn't back up shiat for five years?

Judge away.
 
2013-04-24 08:06:23 PM  
Thanks guys for a summary of the different storage options out there

Just starting my doctoral research and have roughly 10 TB of data from previous work. The sheer volume means I'm looking at multiple offsite storage options.

If anyone has any favorites let me know. Also leading up consolidating 25 years of research to develop in house database for research group.
 
2013-04-24 08:06:37 PM  
No reason why you can't have a backup these days. A 32GB drive the size of my thumbnail costs under $30 these days. In most cases, that's more than enough for documents.
 
2013-04-24 08:07:12 PM  

Banned on the Run: isn't the fact that she's still working on her doctorate 5 yrs in a sign that she's not the sharpest knife in the drawer


That used to be true. But not any more. That's more of a minimum in some fields now really. But as a Ph.D. I can tell you this: You don't have to be smart to succeed in Graduate School. The most important resource by far is ENDURANCE. People much smarter than I have failed to finish, just because they couldn't endure.
 
2013-04-24 08:07:33 PM  

dahmers love zombie: It's called Dropbox. It's free. Look into it.


This.  I tell incoming freshmen about this during orientation.  It's a no brainer.

I once had a professor come in with a bad disk containing the book he'd been working on.  For 8 years.  With the only copy of it on a single 3.5" floppy.  I got most of it back, but he didn't get it all.  He did learn the importance of backups, however.

/still sucked to be him.
// and yes, this was probably 10 years ago.  I'm old.  Deal with it.
 
2013-04-24 08:07:44 PM  
The laptop was not stolen, the research was worthless or badly flawed. That's how this story pans out.
 
2013-04-24 08:08:47 PM  
I'm glad I have no data worth backing up. And what data I do have is on other people's servers, like Drew's, Google or Livejournal. (Yes I do LJ occasionally; in the unlikely event anybody wants the URL, EIP.)

There's nothing on this laptop that's worth a penny to me beyond the hardware itself, and that's only because the laptop was a gift I spent about $150 adding a hard drive and more RAM to. Since I don't do kiddie porn or plot terrorist attacks I can always use a better library machine with more bandwidth for free.

That said, I wish I'd kept more than one copy of my "Juvenalia" folder and/or that I'd taken the trouble to scan or copy that and post it to the Net: an ex-GF's father through out all the poetry of my youth in 1997. (Yes, I used to write poetry, that of course mostly sucked.)
 
2013-04-24 08:12:22 PM  

Coastalgrl: Thanks guys for a summary of the different storage options out there

Just starting my doctoral research and have roughly 10 TB of data from previous work. The sheer volume means I'm looking at multiple offsite storage options.

If anyone has any favorites let me know. Also leading up consolidating 25 years of research to develop in house database for research group.


10TB?  Jesus christ, hopefully it compresses down to something more reasonable at least?  That much would command at least two NASes (little computers devoted to hard drives).  There's some online companies that seems to love storing huge data, here's a list http://online-storage-service-review.toptenreviews.com/  I think the trouble with those would be the sheer upload time it'd take to put the backup there in the first place.  My connection's upload speed for instance is 1Mbit/sec which is roughly 120KB/sec which would take 23 thousand hours to upload unless I mathed it out wrong.
 
2013-04-24 08:12:42 PM  
farking idiot. Phd in 2009, research completed in 2008, one more year of finishing writing and processing data. Two separate backups of all data on two 300gb hard drives in physically separate locations. Sure, I occasionally lost some matlab code here or there or a couple raw data files, but nothing like that.

The real biatch is when you literally have thousands upon thousands of uncompressed SIF images taking up tens of gigs and then hundreds of uncompressed CINE files taking up a couple hundred gigs. It is aggravating backing that shiat up just because it takes serious farking time.
 
2013-04-24 08:14:40 PM  

Sail The Wide Accountancy: I don't know. I'm not sure I buy this story. Are we all really going to believe that "His dog ate his homework". That five years worth of data was on ONE computer? That he never emailed parts of his thesis to anyone?


Yes. Yes. And yes again.

I knew people like that in law school. They thought I was mad! mad, I say! for keeping hard copies as well as multiple flash drive copies. Until someone spilled coffee on the table in the law journal office. As everyone scurried to save their laptops, I said calmly, "You can dry off paper copies..." Oh, and the people who stressed when their computers crashed the night before finals "WITH ALL MY OUTLINES!!!!" --don't you have backups?-- "NO!!!!!!"

So yeah, I believe this. It's extreme, but I totally believe it.
 
2013-04-24 08:15:31 PM  
Dropbox for a project or thesis is a real good idea unless you share your files with someone on your advisement committee and they decide to delete the file.  So, the moral of the story is to have a back up on dropbox of your shiat on dropbox if you're sharing it at all, ever.
 
2013-04-24 08:16:09 PM  
I'm sure backing up your sh*t costs less than a thousand bucks.
 
2013-04-24 08:17:11 PM  

leevis: This link has inspired me to back up my music again. I've loaded more than 1,000 songs onto itunes since the last time.


I've been very happy with using Google Music for this. It will automatically keep an eye on your iTunes folder and upload songs to the cloud as they're added to your iTunes. Also has the benefit of giving you access to your music from any internet-connected device.

Of course, it doesn't work with any songs that have DRM. And I think it caps you at 20,000 songs for the free storage, so it's not ideal for massive libraries.
 
2013-04-24 08:17:53 PM  

lordargent: MaxxLarge:
// this guy is lucky it just got stolen, vs getting dropped on train tracks and run over by a train or something. There's at least some small inkling of a chance that he could get the data back from the thief ... BUT you can't bribe a train!


Friend of mine works for Kroll (the data recovery people, there's more than one). Apparently they were the company that recovered data from the Columbia space shuttle. I don't know the particulars but it's pretty cool that that's even possible.
 
2013-04-24 08:18:15 PM  

Somacandra: Banned on the Run:

isn't the fact that she's still working on her doctorate 5 yrs in a sign that she's not the sharpest knife in the drawer

That used to be true. But not any more. That's more of a minimum in some fields now really. But as a Ph.D. I can tell you this: You don't have to be smart to succeed in Graduate School. The most important resource by far is ENDURANCE. People much smarter than I have failed to finish, just because they couldn't endure.


Whereas I dropped out of 8th grade, got a GED four years later, and since then I've managed to accumulate a few dozen undergrad credits -- mostly in community colleges where I didn't have to pay tuition.

If the reasons for my lack of endurance ain't obvious to y'all farkers by now I discuss it in detail elsewhere.

This of course doesn't mean I'm not an idiot. In fact proving I'm not an idiot sounds harder than proving I'm not an antisemite: I'd rather crawl the AT north-to-south in winter.

(Maybe one of these days I'll copy my best Fark comments to Blogspot, just to be sure.)
 
gja
2013-04-24 08:19:13 PM  
I feel REAL bad for her, but it just goes to show you can have more degrees than a thermometer and STILL be dumber than a farking rock.

A very hard lesson.

/smh as this COULD have been a non-event in her life, now it will damn near define it.
 
2013-04-24 08:19:22 PM  

lolpix: Yes, it's sad. Yes, he's an idiot for not having offsite backups. Yes, fark you for reporting on Reddit stories.


I'm just amazed at how many sites out there survive by poaching stories from them.
 
2013-04-24 08:19:34 PM  
I noticed no one mentioned tape drives...

About $30 per TB and you can lock it in a fire safe. Of course, the drives cost $2000. Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of backup tapes.
 
2013-04-24 08:20:19 PM  
Yes I believe you have my stapler
 
2013-04-24 08:20:24 PM  

lordargent: A few years back when I built this machine, I thought I had tons of space.

[lordargent.com image 850x428]

But nope

[lordargent.com image 827x705]
// I've done some repartitioning as well, but the takeaway is, look at how much longer the bars are in general.


/dev/sda6/dump

If that's your porn stash, you are one sick bastard...NTTAWWT

/most used partition
//vague description
///must be porn
 
2013-04-24 08:20:49 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: always back up your research!!

Watched a guy try to fight his way into a burning building to try to save his research.


scanners and dropbox people, seriously. its 2013. /paper, i hate paper, i do not use paper.
 
2013-04-24 08:20:57 PM  

Lego_Addict: No reason why you can't have a backup these days. A 32GB drive the size of my thumbnail costs under $30 these days. In most cases, that's more than enough for documents.


Except for...well, every single grad student doing laser imaging, high speed video, etc. I could burn through 32GB in a farking day of taking high speed video. As someone upthread mentioned, it is extremely annoying backing up massive amounts of data like that. RAID array is nice, but I have never seen one in a laptop, and then its still physically together. One fire or flood and game over.

You have to keep at it consistently when dealing with that much shiat. Then again, even if you only backup once a week...you only lose a week! Derp. Not five farking years.
 
2013-04-24 08:21:31 PM  
I just have to pile on:

This is why I backup Time Machine, Backblaze, and have all of my grad school documents on Dropbox.
 
2013-04-24 08:21:32 PM  
Backup to dev/null, It's got all the space you need.
 
2013-04-24 08:22:13 PM  
I just bought my second portable hard drive since I figured my two partition backup plan wasn't that great. I kept my copies on one partition and my time machine backup on the other. I'd be double screwed if the drive died then.

/Media on the terabyte
//Time machine on the 500 gig.
///Happy I got the 1TB for $40 on clearance
 
2013-04-24 08:22:26 PM  
What a moron. I keep my important data encoded into my DNA via a genetically engineered retrovirus. That way I ensure that even if I'm somehow separated into my component molecules by a freak supercollider accident, you can still recover my entire pr0n collection by getting a cheek swab from one of my kids.
 
2013-04-24 08:22:41 PM  
About a month or two again, my friend knocked my external hard drive off the desk and onto the floor. On it was every academic work I had written, every picture I downloaded, every song I have, every half-assed writing project I began.

I had to switch to my back-up hard drive, which was about from November. I felt like a complete idiot for having not done backed up for over 3 months. It was inexcusable on my part.

This person would be an idiot if the research was only backed up a year ago. This person deserves everything that happens if you don't think "I should save this in another place" once in five years, especially as a grad student. I get nervous when I don't save a file onto my laptop and my hard drive immediately if it is important.
 
2013-04-24 08:24:15 PM  

Gone to Plaid: lordargent: A few years back when I built this machine, I thought I had tons of space.

[lordargent.com image 850x428]

But nope

[lordargent.com image 827x705]
// I've done some repartitioning as well, but the takeaway is, look at how much longer the bars are in general.

/dev/sda6/dump

If that's your porn stash, you are one sick bastard...NTTAWWT

/most used partition
//vague description
///must be porn


I'm thinking its the WD trio there, trans, full and inc are code for category.  Maybe the questionable 76GB of 'images' too ;)
 
2013-04-24 08:25:02 PM  

AniX: About a month or two again, my friend knocked my external hard drive off the desk and onto the floor. On it was every academic work I had written, every picture I downloaded, every song I have, every half-assed writing project I began.

I had to switch to my back-up hard drive, which was about from November. I felt like a complete idiot for having not done backed up for over 3 months. It was inexcusable on my part.

This person would be an idiot if the research was only backed up a year ago. This person deserves everything that happens if you don't think "I should save this in another place" once in five years, especially as a grad student. I get nervous when I don't save a file onto my laptop and my hard drive immediately if it is important.


If you have not done backed up, you are indeed an idiot.
 
2013-04-24 08:26:12 PM  
BumpInTheNight: 10TB? Jesus christ, hopefully it compresses down to something more reasonable at least? That much would command at least two NASes (little computers devoted to hard drives). There's some online companies that seems to love storing huge data, here's a list http://online-storage-service-review.toptenreviews.com/ I think the trouble with those would be the sheer upload time it'd take to put the backup there in the first place.

That's a lot of data for an individual, but not for a group/business.

What some of these online storage places do is have you send them a disk containing the data for the initial load. Then you only have to do diffs over the network.

BUT, 10 TB of data means you would be sending them a shiatload of disks (5x2TB disks at about $100-$150 per disk).

// OTOH, one of the servers I'm working with has 100TB of disk space on it. I don't even want to know what the backup plan for that thing looks like.
 
2013-04-24 08:28:59 PM  
I blame (shakes magic 8 ball) Steven Hawking. They see me rolling and they hatin
 
2013-04-24 08:29:11 PM  
Odds are it's an elaborate hoax for smoking weed for 5 years on a research stipend.
 
2013-04-24 08:29:55 PM  
10 years ago I started doing Duel backups. It might of been a 10GB drive then, I copied everything twice, always kept one drive unplugged and away from everything else.

Now I have two 2GB Drives and a 64GB solid state - When I want to mirror my backups, I walk over to my safe, open it up - and plug the drive in the network, make my backup, when I am done the secondary gets put back in the safe and locked.

I've lost countless backup drives, i've never lost two at once, when one goes back, I buy two more.

/Sounds stupid, but I lost one backup drive a while back, so I use two - and never had a problem since, its simply not worth the hassle of losing it to begin with. I still have my Western Digital Book from college, both run just fine, as my other backups , However due to age, I rather not risk using them.
 
2013-04-24 08:30:02 PM  

meyerkev: Dropbox
Github
Farking Dropbox
Skydrive
Google Docs
A TB backup drive.
Hell, if it's THAT important, AWS S3.

/Or my personal favorite, A local git repo contained in a dropbox.  Perfect backup across multiple machines coupled with local revision history so you can blow away 6 hours of fail in 3 seconds.


Say that last bit again, but in English.
 
gja
2013-04-24 08:31:03 PM  
I have all of my data replicated between 3 (count 'em....3!) Time Machines.
The backups are mirrored to Carbonite AND Mozy. Every HOUR deltas are sent.
I make my living in I.T., and I practice what I preach.

Back your crap up peoples! HW dies, goes missing, fails, corrupts, is stolen, etc...
 
2013-04-24 08:31:54 PM  
Gone to Plaid: If that's your porn stash, you are one sick bastard...NTTAWWT

Dump is the one partition that isn't backed up.

Dump ... does have porn on it.

Dump also has feature films, television shows, etc.

It's basically a generic dump site for transient files.

If I'm compiling something and need space, it goes to dump. If I'm building a 1GB panoramic image, I build it on dump. If I'm editing video files, I edit them on dump.

lordargent.com
 
2013-04-24 08:32:01 PM  
I temporarily lost a folder (physical folder) with several months worth of field data immediately after coming back to campus.  That was a horrifying week.  Backing up physical, handwritten data in the field is smart, but far far harder than electronic files.

I immediately scanned everything when I found it again.
 
2013-04-24 08:32:50 PM  
I haven't read all the posts on this thread, but would like to point out that while backing-up your data is very necessary, you need to test if your restore works. This is particularly critical because you may discover that, having bought a new laptop or hard drive, once you've restored files to your new hardware, you can't access the files. This seems to be a real problem with Win 7/8 machines. Google it to see the expressions of dismay and soul-destroying angst.

/my little bizness runs on my laptop
//backed up 4 different ways
///hope one of them works
 
2013-04-24 08:33:06 PM  

The One True TheDavid: I'm glad I have no data worth backing up. And what data I do have is on other people's servers, like Drew's, Google or Livejournal. (Yes I do LJ occasionally; in the unlikely event anybody wants the URL, EIP.)

There's nothing on this laptop that's worth a penny to me beyond the hardware itself, and that's only because the laptop was a gift I spent about $150 adding a hard drive and more RAM to. Since I don't do kiddie porn or plot terrorist attacks I can always use a better library machine with more bandwidth for free.

That said, I wish I'd kept more than one copy of my "Juvenalia" folder and/or that I'd taken the trouble to scan or copy that and post it to the Net: an ex-GF's father through out all the poetry of my youth in 1997. (Yes, I used to write poetry, that of course mostly sucked.)


There's poetry that doesn't suck?
 
2013-04-24 08:33:20 PM  
The guy's an idiot;  but I'm repeating everyone else's assessment. For myself I have a lousy 500 songs and nothing vital to my life on my HDD and I've got the thing backed up twice.  The dumbest people I've known over the years have been PhDs.
 
2013-04-24 08:33:21 PM  

lordargent: That's a lot of data for an individual, but not for a group/business.

What some of these online storage places do is have you send them a disk containing the data for the initial load. Then you only have to do diffs over the network.

BUT, 10 TB of data means you would be sending them a shiatload of disks (5x2TB disks at about $100-$150 per disk).

// OTOH, one of the servers I'm working with has 100TB of disk space on it. I don't even want to know what the backup plan for that thing looks like.


Oh absolutely that's small potatoes compared to some of the SANs I work with as well, just thinking for the single person who isn't already into computers that's going to be a rough lesson in do-it-yourselfing or getting reamed by the pre-loaded NASes that commonly attach a 500-1000$ markup on the hardware involved.  Good point about the initial HDD delivery though, that'd make a lot of sense especially if they were willing to send you the drives back at cost of shipping.
 
2013-04-24 08:33:41 PM  
I like BackBlaze. Glacier will be nice to use from AWS too once some software is fleshed out to use it.
 
2013-04-24 08:33:56 PM  
We should at least consider the possibility this is a ploy to lure out the thief.
 
2013-04-24 08:34:16 PM  
Carbonite costs less than $5/mo with automatic, nightly, encrypted backups with unlimited storage.  It also gives you access to restore your data to any internet connected computer in the world.  If your computer gets stolen you can restore your data to a new computer.

Seriously people.  Stop making life so difficult for yourself!  You're spending more than this on coffee.
 
2013-04-24 08:34:18 PM  

Banned on the Run: I submitted this with a better headline, but it had the [DUMBASS] tag.

/also, isn't the fact that she's still working on her doctorate 5 yrs in a sign that she's not the sharpest knife in the drawer


If its direct PhD, no masters, then finishing in five years isn't bad. Even five years for a PhD after MS isn't all that bad. Possible.different setup or brand new code, maybe new advisor, a million things can happen. But please tell us how doing all the experimental setup design for something like an optical engine, making all the drawings, getting it made, writing all the control code, setting up all the experiments, taking all the data, processing it and then writing a 300 page thesis is "simple" and that based on the one "five years ZOMG" piece of information you know.the person is an idiot. Now try pulling that shiat off while a shiat advisor uses you for nonthesis bullshiat and constantly tries to hold you back.

Man, did grad school fill me with hate. Here's how you get out, imo.

1. fark everyone else, fark em. If they aren't doing something for you, fark em.

2. Is what you're working on right now for your thesis? No? Then fark it. If it isn't earning a favor from someone important, fark it. If you were expressly ordered to do bullshiat, switch advisors, take a TA, fark that shiat.

3. Write as you go. Get whatever you can published, yeah, but at least write it up so you don't forget what the fark you did and so you can paste it in later. The writing process will also show things missing in your research or.thinking.

4. If your advisor is a piece of shiat, strongly consider switching. Just...don't stick around for that.
 
2013-04-24 08:36:02 PM  
Jesus and Satan have a discussion as to who is the better programmer. This goes on for a few hours until they come to an agreement to hold a contest, with God as the judge.

They sit themselves at their computers and begin. They type furiously, lines of code streaming up the screen, for several hours straight. Seconds before the end of the competition, a bolt of lightning strikes, taking out the electricity. Moments later, the power is restored, and God announces that the contest is over.

He asks Satan to show what he has come up with. Satan is visibly upset, and cries, "I have nothing. I lost it all when the power went out."

"Very well, then," says God, "let us see if Jesus fared any better."

Jesus enters a command, and the screen comes to life in vivid display, the voices of an angelic choir pour forth from the speakers. Satan is astonished.

He stutters, "B-b-but how? I lost everything, yet Jesus' program is intact. How did he do it?"

God smiled all-knowingly, "Jesus saves."
 
2013-04-24 08:36:10 PM  
Mega is free. She won't make this mistake again.
 
2013-04-24 08:36:23 PM  

Lego_Addict: No reason why you can't have a backup these days. A 32GB drive the size of my thumbnail costs under $30 these days. In most cases, that's more than enough for documents.


Which will likely be kept with what you are backing up and lost with it. Use offsite backup, it is cheap and easy now.
 
2013-04-24 08:37:19 PM  
I kept my dissertation in 7 locations: Work Desktop, Home Desktop, Laptop, Thumbdrive, Gmail, Carbonite, and a PC in the student lounge in my dept. I called them my horcruxes.

This guy is an idiot.
 
2013-04-24 08:37:57 PM  

Gyrfalcon: AniX: About a month or two again, my friend knocked my external hard drive off the desk and onto the floor. On it was every academic work I had written, every picture I downloaded, every song I have, every half-assed writing project I began.

I had to switch to my back-up hard drive, which was about from November. I felt like a complete idiot for having not done backed up for over 3 months. It was inexcusable on my part.

This person would be an idiot if the research was only backed up a year ago. This person deserves everything that happens if you don't think "I should save this in another place" once in five years, especially as a grad student. I get nervous when I don't save a file onto my laptop and my hard drive immediately if it is important.

If you have not done backed up, you are indeed an idiot.


Simultaneously trying to write the same thing two different ways at the same time (here "done a back-up" and "backed up"), my one weakness!
 
2013-04-24 08:37:58 PM  
kidshealth.org
 
2013-04-24 08:40:28 PM  

Dwayne Bansey: I kept my dissertation in 7 locations: Work Desktop, Home Desktop, Laptop, Thumbdrive, Gmail, Carbonite, and a PC in the student lounge in my dept. I called them my horcruxes.

This guy is an idiot.


It's like no one even plays D&D anymore. Thanks harry potter.
/ phylacterys be phylacterin'
 
2013-04-24 08:41:15 PM  
Start a cloud storage company with a name made especially to appeal to masters and doctoral students and advertisement targeted especially like them.
 
2013-04-24 08:42:54 PM  

Tio_Holtzmann: 1. fark everyone else, fark em. If they aren't doing something for you, fark em.

2. Is what you're working on right now for your thesis? No? Then fark it. If it isn't earning a favor from someone important, fark it. If you were expressly ordered to do bullshiat, switch advisors, take a TA, fark that shiat.

3. Write as you go. Get whatever you can published, yeah, but at least write it up so you don't forget what the fark you did and so you can paste it in later. The writing process will also show things missing in your research or.thinking.

4. If your advisor is a piece of shiat, strongly consider switching. Just...don't stick around for that.


My current boss in my postdoc refuses to acknowledge that, having only one year left on my contract, I am looking for a job now, and will leave for the first good full-time permanent position that I find.  Bear in mind, being paid off of a grant means I have no unemployment insurance.  He's hired postbacs and made me responsible for training them, and he keeps raising the bar on what he wants for my next publication, meaning more experiments and time.

My point is that your philosophy holds true for the rest of your career, not just grad school.  Also that the graduate University system is full of shiat, and doesn't prepare  students for what they really need to know (which might jeopardize their jobs). but just to be bench biatches.  Always look out for yourself.
 
2013-04-24 08:43:10 PM  
Just got an upgrade

www.blogcdn.com
 
2013-04-24 08:44:59 PM  
So no one here thought that the guy should have backed up his data?
 
2013-04-24 08:45:28 PM  

ideamaster: Jesus and Satan have a discussion as to who is the better programmer. This goes on for a few hours until they come to an agreement to hold a contest, with God as the judge.

They sit themselves at their computers and begin. They type furiously, lines of code streaming up the screen, for several hours straight. Seconds before the end of the competition, a bolt of lightning strikes, taking out the electricity. Moments later, the power is restored, and God announces that the contest is over.

He asks Satan to show what he has come up with. Satan is visibly upset, and cries, "I have nothing. I lost it all when the power went out."

"Very well, then," says God, "let us see if Jesus fared any better."

Jesus enters a command, and the screen comes to life in vivid display, the voices of an angelic choir pour forth from the speakers. Satan is astonished.

He stutters, "B-b-but how? I lost everything, yet Jesus' program is intact. How did he do it?"

God smiled all-knowingly, "Jesus saves."


OK but which one wins a golden fiddle playing contest?
 
2013-04-24 08:46:41 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: always back up your research!!


^This times a gazillion.
 
2013-04-24 08:48:49 PM  
I know this is how the thread opened, but what's sad is that a doctoral student with five years of research was too stupid to backup their information.
 
2013-04-24 08:49:58 PM  
Certainly no excuse for not backing up simple documents. Those things are tiny, you could stash 100s of copies all over the place without using up any noticeable room at all.

The problem comes in when your research involves things other than documents. I've got a truly disturbing amount of raw FITS format astronomical image files stored on my advisor's server. Those things are into the several hundreds of GB already and we've barely started that particular part of this project; there's going to be a fair number of TB of them before we're done. You can still back that up, but it's starting to get into the realm of being inconvenient, especially if you want multiple backups. Thankfully it's not irreplaceable stuff - it's catalog data, and we could redownload it from the various surveys if we needed to, though it'd certainly be annoying. I don't envy people who have that much data that *is* irreplaceable, for sure!
 
2013-04-24 08:51:17 PM  

xria: You do sort of wonder if this is just a modern update of "The dog ate my homework"


I once had my backpack stolen during finals week.  Not only did I lose my own homework (and a TI-89 calculator and my wallet and...) but I lost the homework for about 70+ students.

(In case you're wondering, I was a grader for an undergrad astronomy class.  The prof was *not* pleased.)
 
2013-04-24 08:51:59 PM  

ultraholland: I know this is how the thread opened, but what's sad is that a doctoral student with five years of research was too stupid to backup their information.


Obviously not a CS doctoral student.
 
2013-04-24 08:52:01 PM  
BumpInTheNight: I'm thinking its the WD trio there, trans, full and inc are code for category. Maybe the questionable 76GB of 'images' too ;)

Sorry but Images (now Photos) is just as mundane as it sounds.

www.lordargent.com
shiatloads of RAW camera files, jpgs from the point and shoot cameras (one is waterproof), shots from the smartphone. Going back to 2000. There's also some drum scans in there as well and a minimal amount of video from the previously mentioned cameras/phone.

I used to store processed JPGs as well, but I got rid of them for older pics (because I needed the space). I also don't store the panoramas either, because Hugin is such a sweet tool that I can just easily recreate them.

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net

And (as someone pointed out in another thread), I don't store any adjusted photos (like horizon leveling, color corrections etc)..

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net

All of that stuff is easy enough to reproduce given the source images, and when the tsunami sent drive prices into the stratosphere I kinda got stuck (didn't want to pay a huge price premium for drives, but I was running out of space). Now that drive prices are back to normal, I've got some building to do.

// all photo processing takes place on /dump as well :P
 
2013-04-24 08:52:04 PM  

ultraholland: I know this is how the thread opened, but what's sad is that a doctoral student with five years of research was too stupid to backup their information.


I think that should be grounds for dismissal from the program.

I had all of my thesis data backed up...on about a 2-foot high stack of punch cards.
 
2013-04-24 08:52:26 PM  
Is this some sort of nationwide prank? Just this morning I saw a similar type notice

"Please return my stolen laptop, $5000, no questions asked, please please please please. Was in a yellow backpack"  ... not an exact quote, though.
 
2013-04-24 08:52:52 PM  
Why do you people keep calling it "research"? All you'e doing is plagiarizing other written works, one sentence at a time and putting them together in a way that it's impossible to tell.
 
2013-04-24 08:53:14 PM  
When my girlfriend started grad school I made her setup remote and local storage solutions for her data. It's on multiple computers that we have physical access to that are in different locations, cloud services, external hard drives, etc. Losing that data would either require the world's most incredible coincidence for everything to fail at once or a natural disaster major enough that the data would no longer be a concern because we'd likely be dead.

Unless your research involves a lot of video data, high quality images, or audio recordings, there are a dozen free cloud services that will each likely hold it all for free. There's no excuse not to take 10 minutes to set one or more up.
 
2013-04-24 08:53:21 PM  

lordargent: Gone to Plaid: If that's your porn stash, you are one sick bastard...NTTAWWT

Dump is the one partition that isn't backed up.

Dump ... does have porn on it.

Dump also has feature films, television shows, etc.

It's basically a generic dump site for transient files.

If I'm compiling something and need space, it goes to dump. If I'm building a 1GB panoramic image, I build it on dump. If I'm editing video files, I edit them on dump.

[lordargent.com image 850x344]


I figured...I just wanted to make a joke about porn and 'dump' made me think about a woman pooping on a guys chest.

/what the hell is wrong with me?
//the guy is supposed to do the pooping
 
2013-04-24 08:54:14 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: When I worked tech support for a computer company, every 'finals' season I would get at least one call, always from a young woman, whose hard drive had crashed and they lost their critical docs.


www.j-walk.com
 
2013-04-24 08:54:39 PM  

Salmon: Just got an upgrade

[www.blogcdn.com image 440x233]


Except for the whole leak into your brain and kill you part
 
2013-04-24 08:54:51 PM  
Late to the thread, has anyone suggested she's stupid for not having a backup?  Anyone suggested one or more ways she could have been backing her shiat up?
 
2013-04-24 08:55:18 PM  

Albert911emt: Use a USB drive....they're cheap and easy to carry.


Quick question: Is there a source for a USB drive that's not made in China?
 
2013-04-24 08:56:07 PM  

Tio_Holtzmann: Lego_Addict: No reason why you can't have a backup these days. A 32GB drive the size of my thumbnail costs under $30 these days. In most cases, that's more than enough for documents.

Except for...well, every single grad student doing laser imaging, high speed video, etc. I could burn through 32GB in a farking day of taking high speed video. As someone upthread mentioned, it is extremely annoying backing up massive amounts of data like that. RAID array is nice, but I have never seen one in a laptop, and then its still physically together. One fire or flood and game over.

You have to keep at it consistently when dealing with that much shiat. Then again, even if you only backup once a week...you only lose a week! Derp. Not five farking years.


If the data was small enough to fit on his laptop it is small enough to backup to cloud storage. If he had separate external hard drives that were stolen he'd be asking for those.
 
2013-04-24 08:57:59 PM  
My PhD thesis was not only backed up daily on dropbox and the university cloud and a usp it was also a new file every day so by the time I finished I had 29 different versions in case there were any mistakes or corrupt files.

/also PhD in Chemistry but from Purdue
 
2013-04-24 08:59:08 PM  

doglover: meyerkev: Dropbox
Github
Farking Dropbox
Skydrive
Google Docs
A TB backup drive.
Hell, if it's THAT important, AWS S3.

/Or my personal favorite, A local git repo contained in a dropbox.  Perfect backup across multiple machines coupled with local revision history so you can blow away 6 hours of fail in 3 seconds.

Say that last bit again, but in English.


Dropbox is automatic backups.  It takes any file you give it and puts it in the cloud and copies it silently to every machine your dropbox is on.

Git is this wonderful thing for keeping "revision history".  It's what programmers use when everyone is working on a project because it lets me edit my bit of the project and you edit your bit of the project (up to and including different lines of the same file) and it just magically merges them.  Basically, it stores every single change that you have ever made to the file that you bothered to commit to the repo.  One of the really nice things that this lets you do is:

Find bug.
Screw around for 6 hours failing to fix bug and in the process screwing the rest of your code.
Immediately revert back to point in time where you found bug, thus blowing away the 6 hours of fail.

So putting a Git repo in a Dropbox lets you magically and automatically have all of your revision history silently and magically backed up to the cloud.  It's not perfect (Namely, it's fairly trivial to absolutely screw up your local repo, and being able to blow it away and pull a good copy from the cloud is useful), but when I heard about this 5 years ago, I thought it was really elegant.
 
2013-04-24 08:59:23 PM  
If I had the 'shop skills I would mod that one 'I'm behind 6 proxies" jpg...

"Good luck!  I'm backed up on 6 NAS devices!"
 
2013-04-24 09:00:00 PM  
dahmers love zombie:

It's called Dropbox.  It's free.  Look into it.

How can Dropbox be free? Do they have lots of ads when you go to use it? Or do they sell your data to 3rd parties? Or both?

Free Accounts Dropbox allows you to store up to 2 GB free of charge. Dropbox reserves the right to terminate Free Accounts at any time, with or without notice. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, if a Free Account is inactive for ninety (90) days, then Dropbox may delete any or all of Your Files without providing additional notice.

For further information regarding your Dropbox Premium or Free Account, please see the Dropbox Terms of Service.


Only 2 GBs. Or, as the front page says, up to 18 GBs, 500 MB per referral (for Business or Personal?), which they can terminate at any time and they'll delete your shiat if you don't log in for 90 days (say if you get hit by a bus).


I'd rather have a few redundant USB drives myself. Or mail the important parts to my Gmail account and let Google keep it safe. (They're good at that: not too long ago I found Usenet posts of mine from 1996.)

Dropbox?

Kids today are so easily impressed.
 
2013-04-24 09:02:35 PM  

Carth: Tio_Holtzmann: Lego_Addict: No reason why you can't have a backup these days. A 32GB drive the size of my thumbnail costs under $30 these days. In most cases, that's more than enough for documents.

Except for...well, every single grad student doing laser imaging, high speed video, etc. I could burn through 32GB in a farking day of taking high speed video. As someone upthread mentioned, it is extremely annoying backing up massive amounts of data like that. RAID array is nice, but I have never seen one in a laptop, and then its still physically together. One fire or flood and game over.


Most students don't use 32gb a day. If this student had years' worth of data on a LENOVO 420 she certainly didn't fit into the edge case described above.  (I had a Lenovo 420, it's seriously low rent. It's a webbrowsing and email-typing machine, not much more.)
 
2013-04-24 09:03:18 PM  
It's nice having a life where all my backup worries can sit on a 32GB jumpdrive.

Remember back in the past when we thought a jumpdrive would be how we'd travel the stars. Now we have them and all their good for is power point presentations and passing kiddie porn.

/You're a bunch of digital hoarders.
 
2013-04-24 09:04:19 PM  
StopLurkListen: Most students don't use 32gb a day. If this student had years' worth of data on a LENOVO 420 she certainly didn't fit into the edge case described above. (I had a Lenovo 420, it's seriously low rent.

So what you're saying is that for the amount of this reward ($1000) she could have bought a whole other LENOVO 420 to back the data up onto, and still had money left over for pot?
 
2013-04-24 09:06:20 PM  
There are so many cloud storage options these days, there is simply no excuse.

ALL of my work is backed up on two cloud services, plus flash drives twice a month.
 
2013-04-24 09:06:57 PM  

FizixJunkee: Albert911emt:

Use a USB drive....they're cheap and easy to carry.

Quick question: Is there a source for a USB drive that's not made in China?


Why "not made in China?" Are you someone I should buddy up to and slip a roofie so I can record your pill talk and sell it to China for enough money to keep both myself and Madonna's brother drunk for the next 20 years?

Seriously, are those drives hacked before you open the damn package? Or what?
 
2013-04-24 09:07:58 PM  
The data loss has been covered repeatedly here, but perhaps someone should mention that if she had PREY installed on her laptop, there would be the smallest chance that she might have been able to get her data, if not her laptop back.

If nothing else, the person that stole it would be alerted to the fact she would give them $1000 for the data, and if it was pawned, the pawnshop would be made aware it was hot.  She might have been alerted to where the laptop was and who was using it (if her laptop came with a built in camera).

It's installed on all my laptops.  Not that I foresee my laptops being stolen but then I don't foresee losing a hard drive to a crash either (but I do backups anyway).

http://preyproject.com/
 
2013-04-24 09:08:25 PM  

The One True TheDavid: I'd rather have a few redundant USB drives myself. Or mail the important parts to my Gmail account and let Google keep it safe. (They're good at that: not too long ago I found Usenet posts of mine from 1996.)

Dropbox?

Kids today are so easily impressed.


What people like is the seamlessness of sharing on multiple machines, not just the backing up. You put a file in the dropbox folder on your computer, and *boom* it's automatically uploaded. Or when a file changes in Dropbox, it also automatically updates on your computer.

You can also share with multiple users. I've worked on some multiple-contributor projects with Dropbox. (I wouldn't recommended for larger groups, though)
 
2013-04-24 09:09:00 PM  

Coastalgrl: Thanks guys for a summary of the different storage options out there

Just starting my doctoral research and have roughly 10 TB of data from previous work. The sheer volume means I'm looking at multiple offsite storage options.

If anyone has any favorites let me know. Also leading up consolidating 25 years of research to develop in house database for research group.


Assuming that the people who you're doing the research for don't also provide/pay for backup space (and I'd personally be SCREAMING), and also assuming that you can't get around the upload problem (ie: You can HAVE 10TB in the cloud, but you can't GET 10 TB to/from the cloud in any reasonable amount of time (where reasonable is defined in single-digit days)), have you considered rolling your own NAS?  It'll be hellishly expensive (~$500 per box plus $50/TB of disk, which probably works out to $75-100/TB of data because of RAID), but how much is your data worth?

I recently bought a 6-bay Netgear and 6 3 TB WD Red drives.  Stuck that in a RAID 10, and got 9 TB of space for my media collection.  If I need to move small files, it's on the wifi.  If I need to move large files, I have GigE, and I can move a TB every 3 hours or so.  Cost about $1700, and I could probably have gotten that lower if I had gone with a FreeNAS build and built my own box.  Since I only have 4-5 TB of data to begin with, I don't care.

So build an 6-bay box now with 6*3 TB Reds in RAID 6 for 12 TB of storage for $1.5K as a backup.  Then this fall, when Western Digital brings out 5 TB Reds, upgrade to 6*5 TB as the secondary backup.
 
2013-04-24 09:10:12 PM  
I'm sure I'll the first person here to say that I backed up my thesis on:

1) My e-mail account
2) My school e-mail account
3) A USB drive
4) Another USB drive
5) My girlfriend's computer
6) Hard copies

/worst case scenario - I'd have lost an hour's worth of work - never happened
 
2013-04-24 09:12:39 PM  

leevis: This link has inspired me to back up my music again. I've loaded more than 1,000 songs onto itunes since the last time.


That's what Spotify is for.
 
2013-04-24 09:13:00 PM  
Have you seen this man?

assets.rollingstone.com
 
2013-04-24 09:16:11 PM  

Coastalgrl: Thanks guys for a summary of the different storage options out there

Just starting my doctoral research and have roughly 10 TB of data from previous work. The sheer volume means I'm looking at multiple offsite storage options.

If anyone has any favorites let me know. Also leading up consolidating 25 years of research to develop in house database for research group.


Here's a heads up - if you've got a Windows 7 machine, you'll have trouble running the built-in Windows backup to an external disk larger than 2 TB. If you want to just copy files to it, you can do so without a problem. I found this out the hard way with a 3 terabyte hard drive. This is only relevant if you want an image of your computer which you can recover if the hard drive fails.

Reference 1 - Western Digital customer support.

Reference 2 - Microsoft support.


RAIDs are designed to stay on all the time. Learn the different flavors of RAIDs (mirroring versus data striping across multiple disks). I didn't want a device that was designed to stay on all the time for personal use. YMMV. Here's a list of RAIDs that could hold all your data in one device.

Here's the lowdown on the NAS.

Also, redundancy. Minimal backup means the data is in two places at one time.

Finally, try to find some reviews (Amazon and the like) for your hard drive. Some vendors/brands are total junk.
 
2013-04-24 09:18:11 PM  
Hate to say it but i am willing to bet that laptop has been wiped and his thesis research is gone.
 
2013-04-24 09:18:52 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: always back up your research!!

Watched a guy try to fight his way into a burning building to try to save his research.


This. How can you make it all the way up to a PhD program and not back up your sh*t?
 
2013-04-24 09:20:15 PM  

bonkmeist: I'm gonna call shenanigans.  This dude hasn't been working on his thesis, and found a great(retarded) excuse for why he doesn't have it done.

/no backups? really?
//really!?


There are no excuses or explanations as to why a thesis is not done.
 
2013-04-24 09:20:17 PM  
I post backup copies of all my important stuff under Red-Lit threads on Fark.

Only costs $5 bucks a month.

/Thanks, Drew!
 
2013-04-24 09:21:53 PM  

FriarReb98: nmrsnr: Well, now every future employer knows how well he plans for future contingencies.

That too.  I see "20-year lab tech" in this person's future.  Maybe even "person who pours the chemicals in the vat at the plant" if they fail that hard.


Shhh I was a 20 year old lab tech. Once. Haaaaated it. Scientists are the most farked up people. Everyone just sat around getting drunk friday afternoons because they were all farked up and depressed.
 
2013-04-24 09:22:41 PM  
StopLurkListen: 

(I had a Lenovo 420, it's seriously low rent. It's a webbrowsing and email-typing machine, not much more.)


You mean a Thinkpad T420?

Lucky you. Today's comments have been posted from a Dell Vostro 1000, the newest & most high-powered machine I have. Of course Farking around like this is pretty much all I do these days so this is more than enough, but still.
 
2013-04-24 09:24:23 PM  

The One True TheDavid: FizixJunkee: Albert911emt:

Use a USB drive....they're cheap and easy to carry.

Quick question: Is there a source for a USB drive that's not made in China?

Why "not made in China?" Are you someone I should buddy up to and slip a roofie so I can record your pill talk and sell it to China for enough money to keep both myself and Madonna's brother drunk for the next 20 years?

Seriously, are those drives hacked before you open the damn package? Or what?


Maybe he would rather not purchase goods made in a country with only a passing familiarity with human rights?

Maybe in his experience, stuff made in China is cheaply made and thus unreliable?

Maybe he's worried about lead poisoning?

Maybe he's worried that once he gets one, he'll want another one half an hour later?
 
2013-04-24 09:24:51 PM  

texdent: Wasn't this the plot of a movie awhile back?


With Honors. Joe Pesci and Brendan Fraser
 
2013-04-24 09:25:20 PM  
Amos Quito:

I post backup copies of all my important stuff under Red-Lit threads on Fark.

Only costs $5 bucks a month.

/Thanks, Drew!


HA. I do that for FREE.

I'm surprised today's stab in the dark got green-lit.
 
2013-04-24 09:25:53 PM  
Educated people can be so dumb. I once worked for a university. One professor had his entire 20+ something years of research on his laptop.  He knocked his laptop off of a podium during a lecture after tripping over the power cord.

He had never once backed up his data.

/saved about 93% of it...but still...
 
2013-04-24 09:28:23 PM  
I don't have a Doctorate, but I am a writer. I have about 12 TB of hard drive space available to me, as well as a Blu-ray Disc burner that handles CD and DVD burning, and at least two cloud services to back up off-site. I have a backup of my projects stored in a fireproof safe, too. Anybody whose computer data is essential to their work spends the time and money to find ways to back up everything they'll need to get back to work after tragedy strikes.

The guy doesn't deserve a Doctorate. He seems to be a dim-bulb who just had the money to buy himself his degrees.
 
2013-04-24 09:29:07 PM  
I wonder if he's really that stupid or if this is just an excuse for not being prepared / ploy for more time. I'm not saying it's likely, but it's a possibility. Maybe things weren't shaping up like he had hoped and is just desperate and stalling?

Meh.

If your life can be farked in the ass by the loss of some files there is no excuse for not having everything backed up in at least two other independent locations. Ideally you should back things up multiple times a day, but, at the very least, you should do it daily.
 
2013-04-24 09:29:21 PM  
StopLurkListen: What people like is the seamlessness of sharing on multiple machines, not just the backing up.

Dropbox is a sync tool, not a backup tool.

Someone is going to learn that the hard way.

1) Delete from one machine and dropbox will (by default) happily delete it from the remaining machines.

2) Dropbox does keep deleted files, but keep in mind that files could also become corrupted (the data equivalent of cancer), and dropbox will (by default) happily copy that corrupted file to the remaining machines.
 
2013-04-24 09:30:47 PM  
I lost all my porn accidentally several years ago. Ouch.
 
2013-04-24 09:31:11 PM  
I have a friend that worked IT for a company about a decade ago.  He told me he got a call from a panicked guy in the UK who was in charge of his company back ups.  I don't recall what the exact problem was, but the upshot was that he'd not only managed to hose their servers and all of their active data, but he hadn't been keeping backups for years.  He begged my friend to help him, saying that he was going to get fired when his boss found out.

My friend thought about it a second and just told him, "Yeah, sounds about right."

/Trying to find a good cloud service for medical files.
//Anyone know one that has good encryption?
 
2013-04-24 09:31:51 PM  
Slackfumasta back to me:

Why "not made in China?"

Maybe he would rather not purchase goods made in a country with only a passing familiarity with human rights?


So would I, but I usually can't afford to buy anything that also China makes.


Maybe in his experience, stuff made in China is cheaply made and thus unreliable?

Well yeah, but... See above.


Maybe he's worried about lead poisoning?

He's not going to eat the USB drive, is he?


Maybe he's worried that once he gets one, he'll want another one half an hour later?

i0.kym-cdn.com
 
2013-04-24 09:32:50 PM  
meyerkev:
/Or my personal favorite, A local git repo contained in a dropbox.  Perfect backup across multiple machines coupled with local revision history so you can blow away 6 hours of fail in 3 seconds.

Nice! I like that one. I'm currently using rdiff-backup with unlimited versions on the home server. On the rare occasions when I program anymore I edit the crontab so it runs every 4 minutes instead of every 4 hours. :)

Terribly primitive compared to your solution, but my programming habits developed in the '80s. Version control systems like git were card-image based and a royal pain to use, so I never got used to them.

// In fact, I don't even use an integrated editor.
/// I mostly use joe, because it tickles my nostalgia to still use commands I learned on WordStar 1.0.
 
2013-04-24 09:33:02 PM  
google drive...dropbox...

anything that is important (docs, etc) goes to the cloud, immediately.  Not only does it make one safe from stolen laptops (well, data-loss-wise, at least), it also means that if I just happen to be at a friend's, at a library, using a touchpad, at a client's using a workstation, where ever, when ever, if the file is on google drive...I'm there in seconds.

How can one be smart enough to pursue a PhD in chem, yet too dumb to make a backup at least, say, once a year?!?  (if not month...week...day...)
 
2013-04-24 09:34:35 PM  

JungleBoogie: RAIDs are designed to stay on all the time. Learn the different flavors of RAIDs (mirroring versus data striping across multiple disks). I didn't want a device that was designed to stay on all the time for personal use. YMMV. Here's a list of RAIDs that could hold all your data in one device.

Here's the lowdown on the NAS.


and the next lesson is RAIDs except for 0 (which is the worst idea for backup ever) require a sacrifice of total capacity depending on which flavour.  In the link you provided not a single one of those could actually hold 10TB after even just raid5's 1 disk worth of parity was factored.  Well the first one would squeeze in there since its 6x2TB drives but that's kind of sketchy.  Btw there is nothing about raids that require them to be 'always on', its just a set of disks combined to a greater purpose, nothing more nothing less.

Next word to the wise:  If you want to buy a proper little NAS at least buy the empty version and stick the drives in yourself.  The markup on those guys is hilarious otherwise, I'm not even talking trying to get by with those horrible little green edition drives either.  For instance, if you bought say the Drobo 5 bay NAS off new egg for a quarter of the price ($599) vs that over priced site you could then turn around and fill it with 3TB drives for ~$120 each, total price for 15TB of drives or 12TB of effective raid5 storage:  $1200.  All you gotta do is actually slide the drives in, those companies are charging a $1000 premium to slide in some drives.  Word to the wise.
 
2013-04-24 09:34:58 PM  
My close call was a .WAV file, only ~5MB, of a last audio recording I did with my grandfather where he talked about being a POW in WWII. He passed soon after and when my dad wanted a copy of it for posterity I had realized I lost it in a HD crash. Fortunately a friend dug up an old email from me with it as an attachment. What a dumbfark.
 
2013-04-24 09:38:37 PM  

eighthourlunch: Not exactly PhD material.

/Sadly, a lot of PhDs aren't.
//Says the snarky physics student.


A lot of degree-holders have I.Q.s south of average.

It pisses me off.
 
2013-04-24 09:39:07 PM  

skinink: He didn't have a backup of his five year thesis? I have backup of all my files, including the porn.


This!

I have copies of almost everything I've done digitally since the early '90's.

Even had an old hard drive for a Mac Plus and a bunch of floppies and ZiP disks until I got tired of hauling them around.
 
2013-04-24 09:40:57 PM  

lordargent: StopLurkListen: What people like is the seamlessness of sharing on multiple machines, not just the backing up.

Dropbox is a sync tool, not a backup tool.

Someone is going to learn that the hard way.

1) Delete from one machine and dropbox will (by default) happily delete it from the remaining machines.

2) Dropbox does keep deleted files, but keep in mind that files could also become corrupted (the data equivalent of cancer), and dropbox will (by default) happily copy that corrupted file to the remaining machines.


Truth.
 
2013-04-24 09:42:10 PM  

nmrsnr: Well, now every future employer knows how well he plans for future contingencies.


Stopped by to make this comment, knowing full well I may have been beaten to it. *salute*
 
2013-04-24 09:42:15 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: always back up your research!!

Watched a guy try to fight his way into a burning building to try to save his research.


Jesus, I even back up my Nickelback collection.

No, I don't actually listen to Nickelback but you get the point - even if it seems stupid, back it up. Let alone your farking thesis.

I have everything ghosted using the surprisingly decent program baked into Win7, plus an extra backup of just the data kept at a friend's house in case my place burns down. Seriously, you can't be too paranoid with years of hard work, or just all the porn you meticulously searched out (this is why I do it, because I dropped out of grad school). While ghosting might be intimidating for your grandmother, keeping all your data in a folder, right-clicking it, hitting "copy," navigating to another drive and hitting "paste" isn't. It's almost as easy as turning the damn thing on, yet so many people don't do it and then cry when the drive fails or the computer is stolen.

Cloud is good, too, unless you're a media hoarder like me and it takes 40 years to upload or retrieve. But this person's thesis could have been saved to dropbox or any other free service. I think The Bible is like 9 KB (no, not really, but the free version of Dropbox is 2 GB). Once set up, it's even automated for fark's sake, thus skipping even the very simple step mentioned above.
 
2013-04-24 09:44:37 PM  
$12 for a USB drive backup? Sorry. You don't deserve to supervise students.
 
2013-04-24 09:45:50 PM  

lordargent: StopLurkListen: What people like is the seamlessness of sharing on multiple machines, not just the backing up.

Dropbox is a sync tool, not a backup tool.

Someone is going to learn that the hard way.

1) Delete from one machine and dropbox will (by default) happily delete it from the remaining machines.

2) Dropbox does keep deleted files, but keep in mind that files could also become corrupted (the data equivalent of cancer), and dropbox will (by default) happily copy that corrupted file to the remaining machines.


This is why my Dropbox folder gets backed up at each end of the sync. I have a full backup from every month for the past few years, plus full backups from each week for the last month, plus daily incremental backups.

Dropbox does keep the last 3 versions of a file. So if a file does become corrupt and synced it isn't necessarily doomed. But, as you said, it's not a replacement for a proper backup and shouldn't be relied upon as one.
 
2013-04-24 09:46:31 PM  

netcentric: A dullard who isn't smart enough to back up their hard drive.

Dumbfark.

You can't fix stupid


But apparently you can give it an advanced degree if it pays enough to a university.

This guy, dumb as he is, will be making more than many of us in ten years' time. And that's why the educational system in America is broken.

/You all do realize his ad also functions as solicitation for someone to write his thesis for $1000 or a "negotiable" fee, don't you?
//Maybe he didn't write one at all, and this was his subtle way of having someone sell him one.
 
2013-04-24 09:47:32 PM  

ladyfortuna: lordargent: MaxxLarge:
// this guy is lucky it just got stolen, vs getting dropped on train tracks and run over by a train or something. There's at least some small inkling of a chance that he could get the data back from the thief ... BUT you can't bribe a train!

Friend of mine works for Kroll (the data recovery people, there's more than one). Apparently they were the company that recovered data from the Columbia space shuttle. I don't know the particulars but it's pretty cool that that's even possible.



Yeah, most of the bits were all over the place!
 
2013-04-24 09:48:00 PM  
Wow.

I *still* have backups of papers I wrote in college... in the early 1990s.
 
2013-04-24 09:48:05 PM  
Since it's a Lenovo can't he just call the Chinese Army and get a copy of his data?

(Supposedly, The U S Government stopped buying Lenovo systems because of 'mystery hardware')
 
2013-04-24 09:49:33 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: When I worked tech support for a computer company, every 'finals' season I would get at least one call, always from a young woman, whose hard drive had crashed and they lost their critical docs.  Every bloody time, they had zero backups.  Going forward, every time I talked to a parent who mentioned buying the computer for their college bound child, or to a kid in college, I told them to go out, buy a thumb drive, put it on their key chain, and keep backups of their important stuff on it.

When I actually did work at a college, most of the students I worked with had thumb drives.  The smart ones also emailed themselves their really critical docs so they'd be stored on-line.

And of course, now there's Dropbox and other cloud services.

/but wait, what if I really want to put everything important to me on one small box that can be easily stolen or destroyed?


I email myself stuff all the time. Plus backup to an external hard drive.
 
2013-04-24 09:53:33 PM  

JungleBoogie: Coastalgrl


Thanks for the low down. I had considered a RAID but know that they do need maintenance. I will have to read up on them. The cost of the RAID is minimal compared to the cost of the data. Most of which is not recoverable or expensive to reproduce.

Due to a building rehab (deadly mold spores = gutting down to the foundation), the entire office has been spread around for over a year so. My own personal office has moved 3-4 times suddenly so my files are all over the place. Once we are all back into one place, I intend on spending a month on data organization.

I have no clue where anything is other than my own current research. Drives me nuts.
 
2013-04-24 09:54:02 PM  
164 post in and no one has chastised this guy for not backing up his data. Fark, I am disappoint.
 
2013-04-24 09:54:43 PM  
If it's important, you back that shiat up. It just might save us from the dark seekers.

img195.imageshack.us

/six redundant drives
 
2013-04-24 09:59:24 PM  
I'd flunk him just for not backing it up.

(on a frigging laptop for crying out loud)
 
2013-04-24 10:00:11 PM  
I guess he wont graduate with honors, unless he helps out a dying hobo

www.joshhamiltonactor.com
 
2013-04-24 10:00:20 PM  
louiedog: Dropbox does keep the last 3 versions of a file. So if a file does become corrupt and synced it isn't necessarily doomed.

So it's 3 steps away from the cliff vs being one step away from the cliff.

For files that aren't accessed that often, how long would it take before someone noticed that the file was bad?

// then again, the same applies to regular backups as well. Backing up alone isn't enough, every once in a while you have to check to see what the hell you're actually backing up.

// for me, dropbox is just a transient, I mostly use it to get files from my phone or tablet onto the desktop computer where they can be backed up. I also use it to get scans (of passports, itineraries, visas, confirmation slips, etc) onto my phone and tablet when I travel. It's also awesome for getting configuration files from one machine to another (EX: if I change my adblock settings, I export the config to dropbox, then load it on the other computers at some point).
 
2013-04-24 10:04:23 PM  

meyerkev: Coastalgrl


Since its grant money, its inconsistent funding so internal developments are always last which is not the way to run things long term.

This is actually a reasonable solution. I didn't realize the boxes were that cheap. In theory, I could purchase a couple drives at a time and move things from the 5 hard drives (4 portable, 1 internal) to the RAID. In order to interface with the RAID, I would need a separate OS or does it come with some minimal interface program and just access it like a giant HD?

Right now I have one large back up drive (2 TB), a 2 TB portable, 500 GB internal HD and 2 smaller portable ones. The rest of the data is housed offsite till I find a better solution. I have some very nice friends with RAIDS but several states away.
 
2013-04-24 10:05:08 PM  
Ok... Since we are talking about cloud storage: does anyone have informed opinions about a Pogoplug device (not the cloud storgae) vs. just using Dropbox?

Is the Pogoplug basically just your own cloud storage drive?
 
2013-04-24 10:11:15 PM  

Coastalgrl: meyerkev: Coastalgrl

Since its grant money, its inconsistent funding so internal developments are always last which is not the way to run things long term.

This is actually a reasonable solution. I didn't realize the boxes were that cheap. In theory, I could purchase a couple drives at a time and move things from the 5 hard drives (4 portable, 1 internal) to the RAID. In order to interface with the RAID, I would need a separate OS or does it come with some minimal interface program and just access it like a giant HD?

Right now I have one large back up drive (2 TB), a 2 TB portable, 500 GB internal HD and 2 smaller portable ones. The rest of the data is housed offsite till I find a better solution. I have some very nice friends with RAIDS but several states away.


There may be reason to step one notch higher as well then those pre-built NAS boxes, you can use an operating system called FreeNAS (Free as in beer) to transform any computer into a NAS and then the limit is only the amount of drives you can reasonably connect to the thing (both internal and external) and its super-extendable (again just a matter of the physical connection limits).  I recently bought a rack-mount server case with 15 internal drive bays for $130, stuffed in an older motherboard, CPU & other guts and then maxed out the motherboard's sata ports with drives (8 total).  When I need more space I can very cheaply buy a PCIE based raid controller card for under $200 and that'll net you another set of ports to max out the rest of the drive bays.  Then if you're still hungry for more storage you can also get some eSata enclosures and keep going up and up.  FreeNAS supports ZFS expansions (adding more drives to your pool(s)) and again it itself is free.

Its not exactly an easy project to tackle without some experience but it may be the forward way to go short of going for a full-out rack-mount style NAS from one of the OEMs but you're looking at 10K+ in cost for those and overkill for performance needs.
 
2013-04-24 10:11:31 PM  

StopLurkListen: lordargent: StopLurkListen: What people like is the seamlessness of sharing on multiple machines, not just the backing up.

Dropbox is a sync tool, not a backup tool.

Someone is going to learn that the hard way.

1) Delete from one machine and dropbox will (by default) happily delete it from the remaining machines.

2) Dropbox does keep deleted files, but keep in mind that files could also become corrupted (the data equivalent of cancer), and dropbox will (by default) happily copy that corrupted file to the remaining machines.

Truth.


I use SpiderOak. It's a so-called zero-knowledge encrypted back up and sync service that keeps historical versions of all your files. I have numerous other backup systems, as that's kind of my job, but if you only have one back up, I recommend SpiderOak.
 
2013-04-24 10:13:02 PM  
neofonz: I *still* have backups of papers I wrote in college... in the early 1990s.

The oldest file on my system is from 1997, it's a text file listing of social security number prefixes vs the geographic area from the SSA.

Modified date: 05/11/1997

// IIRC, I had a pentium 100, 33.6 dialup and either a 1GB or 3GB hard disk then.

// I probably have a ton of documents that I no longer need, but ain't nobody got time to do a data purge.

// scratch that, I just found a journal from 1995 :P

Sept 24/1995: Television Rant
If the television is a reflection of our general society. Then our society is generally filled with idiots. Most of the shows today are humor based, even shows which are modeled after people's lives. I see this degradation of quality not only in television programming, but also in recent movies, comic books, it is even creeping it's way into music. SO I have greatly reduced my intake of said "entertainment" which does not do the job it was intended to do.


I was 18, and reality TV hadn't even hit its stride yet and I was working part time for a small time comic book publisher (so I was mostly talking about writing). I didn't even OWN a computer then (this shiat was on 3&1/2"s and I was doing the work in computer labs).
 
2013-04-24 10:13:35 PM  

dahmers love zombie: It's called Dropbox.  It's free.  Look into it.

/I lost twenty pages of my master's thesis in 1990.  Even THEN I felt stupid that it wasn't on multiple floppies.


When I was writing my dissertation in 2008/2009 I made backups of backups of backups to more devices than I care to remember.  Got myself so confused I started losing track of which one I was working on.  I saw a guy once who had EVERYTHING on his thumb drive when they were a new fangled thing.  The device failed and he went all Darth Vader in Episode III.  Then he started shaking and just sort of had a complete mental breakdown for a few days.
 
2013-04-24 10:16:29 PM  

ideamaster: God smiled all-knowingly, "Jesus saves."


That was so awful I actually lol'd! Pleasantly silly after an evening of dick jokes and the politics tab.
 
2013-04-24 10:16:33 PM  

OregonVet: Holy crap google is getting bad. There is a classic out there if a guy on the phone with tech support about his research. Used to find it in a few searchable words, all ads now.


Stephen Thrasher. IIRC it's on Ebaum's World.
 
2013-04-24 10:24:44 PM  
E-mail yourself copies, or buy a web hosting package for cheap who do ftp and backups everyday. Failing that, Dropbox!
 
2013-04-24 10:26:21 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: always back up your research!!


What was it The Stealth Hippopotamus used to tell me about my research?

always back up your research
always
always
always
back up your research
back up your research
back up
never back up your research
 
2013-04-24 10:26:23 PM  

lordargent: // scratch that, I just found a journal from 1995 :P


Not trying to one-up you, but I recently found some files from '94 on a floppy, from college. It was an old P3 or something some guy had in working condition and I couldn't pass it up. Yes, the disk still worked after having been stored in my grandmother's house lo those years.

The papers were OK. Like many 20 year-olds I wasn't always making the most cogent arguments (still don't), but they were enough to somehow graduate - which I accomplished in spare time not spent drinking.

However, there were also love letters and tomes of fiction so awful that decorum prohibits me from mentioning them here. I can't even quote any of it for your amusement without wanting to stab my left eye with a fork.
 
2013-04-24 10:27:53 PM  
Not sure if to believe. When I wrote the thesis for my Masters in Chemistry I had copies everywhere. To this day I find versions of my thesis on thumbdrives, emails, other computers, not to mention the copies my advisor got. On the data end, the computers it was acquired on have copies, there are printed copies and the pdfs and huge gifs of cropped sample spectra that I shuffled around with my thesis copies. There hasn't been paper only data since the early 90s. It actually awesome to open up the pdfs in photoshop to crop and edit instead of the usual scanned data, the data in my printed thesis looks amazingly crisp. Procedures and yields and all that jazz always ended up with my advisor as well as on presentation posters, heck the posters were the easiest place to get yields and procedures for the thesis because it was in nicely formatted tables and was of the best procedures and yields. Like I said before if he was close to defense his thesis advisor would have copies so the turd could get polished before it goes  to the thesis committee. But then again I may be wrong, there were some real dummies with no common sense or talent getting their thesis too, I could have counted the competent grad students with one hand. Also from that time I learned China and India are diploma mills, not one of the people in the Masters program that came from those countries was competent but they sure liked to act like they were hot shiat.
 
2013-04-24 10:35:24 PM  

MadSkillz: FriarReb98: nmrsnr: Well, now every future employer knows how well he plans for future contingencies.

That too.  I see "20-year lab tech" in this person's future.  Maybe even "person who pours the chemicals in the vat at the plant" if they fail that hard.

Shhh I was a 20 year old lab tech. Once. Haaaaated it. Scientists are the most farked up people. Everyone just sat around getting drunk friday afternoons because they were all farked up and depressed.


Re-read the earlier post, "20-year lab tech" /= "20 year old lab tech", it means working as a lab tech for 20 years, otherwise known as inability to get off the post-doc merry-go-round.
 
2013-04-24 10:37:03 PM  
If he/she was a sociology student I would call BS and guess that this was part of the thesis, an examination of what kind of forgeries people might bring in order to try to claim the $1000. But a chemistry degree? Nope, just someone with no common sense.
 
2013-04-24 10:38:01 PM  
My PhD adviser told the story of one of his former students, probably 20 years ago. The guy spends 4 years or so doing his PhD and gives the rough draft of his dissertation (hardcopy) to his adviser. Then his computer crashes and apparently he loses everything. Instead of just retyping his dissertation (or has someone do it for him), he gets a job and never completes his PhD.

When I was writing my dissertation, I kept copies on the university's server, my school computer, USB thumb drive, DVD-R and home computer. I also kept saving as new files when I made any substantial changes or every week when I was heavily writing. Also, each chapter was its own file (or series of files of older versions) because I was afraid of the files getting corrupted. Plus Office 2007 is a terribly slow and crash prone suite. That was the most frustrating part dealing with horrible Office 2007.
 
2013-04-24 10:38:45 PM  
dickfreckle: However, there were also love letters and tomes of fiction so awful that decorum prohibits me from mentioning them here. I can't even quote any of it for your amusement without wanting to stab my left eye with a fork.

this is utter horseshiat! Make with the embarrassing stuff or I will find you and go completely Liam Neeson.
 
2013-04-24 10:39:32 PM  

born_yesterday: Copy on laptop, copy on flash drive, copy on desktop at work, save & send copies of drafts sent to work email.

I do really feel bad for her, though.  The good news is she gets to be a graduate student for a little bit longer.  Party on.


Where does it say is is a she?
 
2013-04-24 10:42:31 PM  
Hard to believe the student didn't have copies of the thesis elsewhere.  Losing research sucks, though.  I've lost all my data in hard-drive failures for work that was in the process of being reviewed for publication.   Twice.  So if I'm a coauthor on your paper, prepare for the data to be lost once the paper is in review.
 
2013-04-24 10:43:24 PM  
Not sure if it's been pointed out yet, but intelligence =/= common sense.
 
2013-04-24 10:51:25 PM  

lolpix: I use SpiderOak. It's a so-called zero-knowledge encrypted back up and sync service that keeps historical versions of all your files. I have numerous other backup systems, as that's kind of my job, but if you only have one back up, I recommend SpiderOak.


They look like a good company. But, if you have only one backup, I'd still recommend NOT using a small-business cloud service. Back in the post-2001 tech recession, several early cloud storage companies literally disappeared overnight, when creditors came to the facility with a court order and confiscated all the hardware and furnishings. Some customers never saw their data again.

SPIDEROAK CANNOT GUARANTEE UNINTERRUPTED SERVICE, SERVICE AT ANY PARTICULAR TIME, OR INTEGRITY OF DATA, INFORMATION OR CONTENT STORED OR TRANSMITTED VIA THE INTERNET. SPIDEROAK WILL NOT BE LIABLE FOR ANY UNAUTHORIZED ACCESS TO, OR ANY CORRUPTION, ERASURE, THEFT, DESTRUCTION, ALTERATION OR INADVERTENT DISCLOSURE OF, DATA, INFORMATION OR CONTENT TRANSMITTED, RECEIVED OR STORED ON ITS SYSTEM CAUSED BY CIRCUMSTANCES OUTSIDE OF SPIDEROAK'S CONTROL.
 
2013-04-24 10:53:31 PM  
Just about everyone makes this mistake only once. Pity he didn't make it earlier. That or this is a really elaborate excuse for why he's got nothing.
 
2013-04-24 11:00:12 PM  

christ1: My PhD adviser told the story of one of his former students, probably 20 years ago. The guy spends 4 years or so doing his PhD and gives the rough draft of his dissertation (hardcopy) to his adviser. Then his computer crashes and apparently he loses everything. Instead of just retyping his dissertation (or has someone do it for him), he gets a job and never completes his PhD.


At that point, I would have paid someone $10.00/hour (or whatever the going rate is) to just type it up again for me.
 
2013-04-24 11:03:33 PM  
Phd student doesnt make backup. Loses his whole thesis...
 
2013-04-24 11:04:25 PM  
That's the advantage of doing a Ph.D. in mathematics.  If you lose your dissertation you can just type it in again.  It doesn't rest on years worth of measurements that you can lose.

Signal processing is similar:  your dissertation does require data, but if you lose it, you can recompute it.  If I had lost my entire drive, it would probably have taken a week of frantic work to recode the algorithms, reproduce my data and retype the whole 150ish pages of my dissertation.

In fact, I actually did lose some of my dissertation, not due to a system crash but just lousy file management.  One chapter was tucked away in a random tarball that I mistakenly deleted to make some space.  I freaked out at first, and then I realized that since I published that chapter, it was actually on the shelf at the engineering library.  I was able to get the bibliography (the one thing I didn't want to re-do) and then retype the rest.
 
2013-04-24 11:05:41 PM  
Beowoolfie: They look like a good company. But, if you have only one backup, I'd still recommend NOT using a small-business cloud service.

I understand your point. But, to put things in perspective, some the world's largest institutions disappeared after the economic collapse of 2008. Being large doesn't necessarily mean a company is more secure. And it's also important to consider that the odds of losing your primary copy and your off-site backup service being shut down simultaneously are remote enough that if you only need to maintain one backup copy, they're probably negligible.
 
2013-04-24 11:06:50 PM  
We had a pact in my lab:  in the event of fire, someone would break out the window and throw any lab notebooks to the street below.  Funny how we didn't really think about getting the hell out of the lab. Guess the grad experience warps you.
 
2013-04-24 11:09:19 PM  

Lt. Cheese Weasel: You spend 5 years doing the shiat and not back it up? You're not worthy of a PhD in Social Science.


Rather, they are worthy of a PhD in social science
 
2013-04-24 11:12:50 PM  
And he is an Obama voter as well. But heh, college means you are smart, right? What's that? 5 years of work and he only had it on a laptop?

Smrt.
 
2013-04-24 11:13:42 PM  
Coastalgrl:
1)In theory, I could purchase a couple drives at a time and move things from the 5 hard drives (4 portable, 1 internal) to the RAID.

2) In order to interface with the RAID, I would need a separate OS or does it come with some minimal interface program and just access it like a giant HD?



1) Not necessarily.  Basically, once you make a RAID array, you can't remake the RAID array without deleting the data and reformatting the drives AFAIK.   Now if you went the FreeNAS ZFS 'build-your-own-box' route, ZFS has all sorts of cool stuff to help you extend your arrays and basically do everything that the crazy file system nerds have been wishing for for the last few decades, and it's basically magic.  (It also has like no OS support outside of FreeNAS and I believe BSD, so YMMV)

2) OS-wise, the box itself will have its own OS, which will either be FreeNAS or some custom OS from the OEM if you go the pre-built route.

From your personal computer, you can then just treat the FreeNAS drive(s) like you'd treat any other network share.  Right now, my NAS is mounted into my Windows 7 laptop as the Z: drive and as long as I have a stable network connection, I'd be able to treat it like any other (high-latency, extremely slow) drive.

/Also, keep in mind that those numbers are ballpark.  Basically, the more drives you add to a single box, the more expensive it gets to attach the next drive, especially once you get above 6 drives.  So a 2 drive prebuilt NAS might be $3-400 for just the box, but an 8-drive prebuilt NAS might be $1000+ for just the box.
 
2013-04-24 11:16:48 PM  

Thunderpipes: And he is an Obama voter as well. But heh, college means you are smart, right? What's that? 5 years of work and he only had it on a laptop?

Smrt.


Be funnier.
 
2013-04-24 11:28:33 PM  

BumpInTheNight: Coastalgrl: Thanks guys for a summary of the different storage options out there

Just starting my doctoral research and have roughly 10 TB of data from previous work. The sheer volume means I'm looking at multiple offsite storage options.

If anyone has any favorites let me know. Also leading up consolidating 25 years of research to develop in house database for research group.

10TB?  Jesus christ, hopefully it compresses down to something more reasonable at least?  That much would command at least two NASes (little computers devoted to hard drives).  There's some online companies that seems to love storing huge data, here's a list http://online-storage-service-review.toptenreviews.com/  I think the trouble with those would be the sheer upload time it'd take to put the backup there in the first place.  My connection's upload speed for instance is 1Mbit/sec which is roughly 120KB/sec which would take 23 thousand hours to upload unless I mathed it out wrong.


She should use 7-zip to compress it into pieces and first put the thirds on different storage sites, then take the time to upload all parts to all three.
 
2013-04-24 11:32:10 PM  

you_idiot: Exactly. PhD in chemistry, preschool backup skills.

That's what happens when you grow up in the era of reliable hard drives. Unlike us old fogies who grew up listening to the grind of the motors of a 5.25" floppy (which we had 3 back ups of each).

Chunk chunk bbbbbrrrrraaaaaappppp chunk chunk brrrrrrraaaaaappppp.... the sound of backup #3 of thesis work on floppy drive. Oh well, switch to copy number 2, buy another $10 5.25" floppy and make that the new back up disk.


Google YouTube //e fire organ
There's the sound you're  thinking of. 5.25
Apple duodisk drive
 
2013-04-24 11:35:51 PM  
I've just finished my doctorate but this is still making me feel a bit ill.

I had backups on:

1) two external hard drives
2) disk-on-key
3) home computer
4) office computer
5) dropbox
6) emailed myself the really important stuff

Also, I used FreeFileSync.  farking great program.  Straightforward, intuitive.  Even grandma could use it.
 
2013-04-24 11:43:18 PM  
Who doesn't back up five years of research?
 
2013-04-24 11:44:02 PM  
My favorite backup story was when my old boss, PhD engineer from MIT (and a complete ass) asked me to verify results that the (small) company had been using in it's advertising for a couple of years.  It did not take me more than a few hours to realize the guy who originally achieved the results (not the sharpest spoon in the drawer) had compared our software to a debuggable version of the competitors software hence achieving amazing speed ups that no customer ever saw after buying our software.  I thought anyone involved in that debacle (e.g. my boss)  should have resigned on the spot but my work was immediately questioned by the boss and his boss and I was told to find the old data.  It turned out that the companies software development process was shiat (thanks to my boss) and the only archive of said results was an old back up tape that was produced by equipment so old that there was only one working drive in the entire company in an office on the west coast (we were in Boston) and that drive had not been used for over a year.  After overnight the tape across the country we (my boss, his boss, several other players) teleconferenced in as the company IT head fed the tape into the drive.  After a moment he said "Oh shiat it just ate the tape."  I could not stop laughing.  Surprisingly I was not fired but after spending months blaming others that were no longer with the company my boss left the company for a higher paying job.  Btw, if you can bs your way through a PhD from MIT you can be the biggest tool in the world and still land a great job.
 
2013-04-24 11:47:10 PM  
Google Docs, Drop Box, iCloud, and Skydrive users may all point and laugh now.
 
2013-04-24 11:47:57 PM  
I had maybe 2500 hours worth of interviews I did on Yahoo messenger that I lost to an "upgrade".

Some of those people I interviewed have been dead for the better part of a decade.

Fark Yahoo.
 
2013-04-24 11:55:37 PM  

Thunderboy: The Stealth Hippopotamus: always back up your research!!

What was it The Stealth Hippopotamus used to tell me about my research?

always back up your research
always
always
always
back up your research
back up your research
back up
never back up your research


What about putting salt in your eye?
 
2013-04-25 12:15:39 AM  
So what's the cheapest way to backup large quantities of data that you don't want transmitted over the internet? I backup in triplicate, and one copy is disconnected from my system, but a fire/tornado/flood/Godzilla could easily wipe out everything at once. The combination of slow internet (relative to drive speeds) and paranoia (not wanting my data physically available to others, even though it's all encrypted) makes online backups less than ideal for me.
 
2013-04-25 12:30:35 AM  
For my thesis and dissertation, part of the problem was keeping old copies of them organized, because I liked to have old copies of my work in case did something incredibly dumb (it happened, but I forget how) and had to start from a previously saved point. Stories like this are generally repeated ad nauseum through grad school as warnings, so I guess thousands of grad students owe this guy a thanks for the reminder.
 
2013-04-25 12:45:06 AM  

Bisu: So what's the cheapest way to backup large quantities of data that you don't want transmitted over the internet? I backup in triplicate, and one copy is disconnected from my system, but a fire/tornado/flood/Godzilla could easily wipe out everything at once. The combination of slow internet (relative to drive speeds) and paranoia (not wanting my data physically available to others, even though it's all encrypted) makes online backups less than ideal for me.


Do you get eight hours of sleep a night?

Start the online backup last thing before you go to bed.

/if you don't get eight hours of sleep a night, you should
//unless you really intend to kill yourself before you reach 30, it will catch up to you
 
2013-04-25 12:50:08 AM  

Bisu: So what's the cheapest way to backup large quantities of data that you don't want transmitted over the internet? I backup in triplicate, and one copy is disconnected from my system, but a fire/tornado/flood/Godzilla could easily wipe out everything at once. The combination of slow internet (relative to drive speeds) and paranoia (not wanting my data physically available to others, even though it's all encrypted) makes online backups less than ideal for me.


Short Version:

Find someone who lives in another state that you visit every few months (Family Celebrations are a good one).   Keep 1 at home, 1 portable, and 1 at their place.  Whenever you go visit, physically take the box/drive with you and back it up while you're visiting.
 
2013-04-25 01:11:52 AM  

Pincy: Who doesn't back up five years of research?


Somebody who never lost data before.

As weird as it sounds, the people I know who don't do backups, or don't keep multiple copies of stuff around, are invariably people who have never had the joyous experience of never having lost large files before; or better still, never had to sit for a week cursing and praying before that awful message: WARNING: Reformatting the drive will remove all data on the drive! Do you want to proceed? Y/N? before finally hitting...Yes...

Most of us get to do this sometime early in our careers, and learn from it; but as computers have become more reliable, I've encountered many people who have never had this delightful experience until something like this happens.
 
2013-04-25 01:23:55 AM  

skinink: He didn't have a backup of his five year thesis? I have backup of all my files, including the porn.
[imageshack.us image 650x488]


Heh... That is Windows ME.
 
2013-04-25 01:32:11 AM  
I've seen this happen before actually, at my school - hey, smart people: if you dont know computers (and you dont back them up) you're not that smart after all.
 
2013-04-25 01:37:08 AM  
images.sodahead.com
 
2013-04-25 01:57:45 AM  
LookForTheArrow : I've seen this happen before actually, at my school - hey, smart people: if you dont know computers (and you dont back them up) you're not that smart after all.

Nahh, they just used computing as a dump stat.
 
2013-04-25 02:15:07 AM  
working toward multiple engineering degrees, working a shiat job at an office supply store.  The only reason I still work there is because I get cheap products.  Hide a drive or two behind the counter, forget about them for a month or two and presto, bargain storage.  For my arduino/c/chemistry/matlab/solidworks/verilog projects. I can't get it through my head how this person didn't back up their data.  How do you not have the information on at least 3 drives which are geographically separate from each other?  My current files are on my laptop, 16gb drive x 2, RedTwistGeo(8gb drive), and a host of smaller drives which hold individual class information/data/projects.  I am crap for getting them organized, but everything damn well has a backup.

/extra backups are for my collection of GoT episodes.
//senior project will be interesting... chemical/electrical/mechanical project
///evil genius laughter
////*weeps because my college doesn't have a chemical engineering program*
 
2013-04-25 02:15:25 AM  

Albert911emt: Use a USB drive....they're cheap and easy to carry.

....or copy your stuff onto Google Drive. The first 5gb is free, 30gb is about $3/month, 100gb is about $5/month.

...or use Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, etc, etc to store your stuff. Your PC or tablet just isn't good enough anymore.


I'm very happy with Google Drive, as I can type in my grocery list on my computer during the week, and it shows up nicely on my Android phone when I'm finally grocery shopping.
 
2013-04-25 02:35:42 AM  
Found a copy of my dissertation saved on 3.5" floppy as a Wordperfect file the other day.

I remember when Word was too complicated.
 
2013-04-25 02:46:07 AM  

UnspokenVoice: skinink: He didn't have a backup of his five year thesis? I have backup of all my files, including the porn.
[imageshack.us image 650x488]

Heh... That is Windows ME.


I'm almost positive we all agreed to never speak of WinME again. I think it's in the posting FAQ somewhere.
 
2013-04-25 05:00:03 AM  
Gets PHD, Still doesn't backup important computer files.
 
2013-04-25 05:10:08 AM  
Don't forget the best backup of all: microfilm-readable tattoos.
 
2013-04-25 05:11:26 AM  

Nezorf: Back it up!

Witnessed the aftermath of a woman who was robbed for her backpack but she fought tooth and nail for a notebook within it.
The result was bad.


Bad as in, she lost her data; or bad as in, she was brutally raped and murdered?
 
2013-04-25 05:32:23 AM  
Always back up your files.
Always back up your files.
Always, always,
Always, always,
ALWAYS back up your files.
 
2013-04-25 06:08:54 AM  
I think anyone stupid enough not to take a few minutes to back up 5 years of research is probably not Ph.D. material.
 
2013-04-25 06:22:06 AM  

lolpix: Beowoolfie: They look like a good company. But, if you have only one backup, I'd still recommend NOT using a small-business cloud service.

I understand your point. But, to put things in perspective, some the world's largest institutions disappeared after the economic collapse of 2008. Being large doesn't necessarily mean a company is more secure. And it's also important to consider that the odds of losing your primary copy and your off-site backup service being shut down simultaneously are remote enough that if you only need to maintain one backup copy, they're probably negligible.


Large, publicly-traded corporations don't normally vanish overnight; they give months of warning.  I'd call them more secure from that perspective. At that time, I was providing independent computer support to homes and small businesses. One of my regular customers got burned by one of these services (don't remember which). She was using them for archival storage, and all her previous years went *poof*. Granted, that's different from using them to back up your active files, but that's why I remember it.

After a 25-year career in computing, I'm just paranoid about backups. I've never seen anyplace else where Murphy's Law stays so busy (but then I've never worked with missile launches or nuclear power).

I was there when both halves of a mirrored RAID failed within 15 minutes of one another.

When all 3 redundant backup tapes of the hospital's patient database had unreadable spots (due to the tape drive quietly damaging them after they were written and verified, during the farkin' rewind! I curse you forever, drive 281.), I was the guy who had to reassemble the damned thing, working from a dozen, foot-thick hex dumps of readable parts of the tapes That was my longest workday ever, at just over 40 straight hours. I was sick for a week after.

I was watching as the new, multi-million-dollar enterprise backup system crashed its supposedly failsafe catalog file in its first month after a solid year of testing. Glad  I was just watching rather than involved. When the catalog crashed, the system lost track of 2/3rds of a petabyte of backup data. Management didn't like having to start over with fresh, full backups for over 10,000 servers. Time is money, etc. The cool part, though, was it was the first time I heard anyone actually say "petabyte" in a practical, rather than theoretical situation.

And there are more stories where those came from. Somebody out there really hates backups, and he scares me. :)
 
2013-04-25 06:23:53 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Pincy: Who doesn't back up five years of research?

Somebody who never lost data before.

As weird as it sounds, the people I know who don't do backups, or don't keep multiple copies of stuff around, are invariably people who have never had the joyous experience of never having lost large files before; or better still, never had to sit for a week cursing and praying before that awful message: WARNING: Reformatting the drive will remove all data on the drive! Do you want to proceed? Y/N? before finally hitting...Yes...

Most of us get to do this sometime early in our careers, and learn from it; but as computers have become more reliable, I've encountered many people who have never had this delightful experience until something like this happens.


I had the good fortune to learn this lesson very early. Back in the day I used one of the earliest word processors around that for some reason had a DELETE DEATH key that when inadvertently pressed would delete the entire document--no Y/N or Are you sure?--and with no restore option. Eventually I physically disabled the key with tape. And also learned to back up frequently.
 
2013-04-25 07:21:49 AM  
not sure why this resonates with me
but I genuinely feel sorry for 'em
 
2013-04-25 07:46:31 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Pincy: Who doesn't back up five years of research?

Somebody who never lost data before.

As weird as it sounds, the people I know who don't do backups, or don't keep multiple copies of stuff around, are invariably people who have never had the joyous experience of never having lost large files before; or better still, never had to sit for a week cursing and praying before that awful message: WARNING: Reformatting the drive will remove all data on the drive! Do you want to proceed? Y/N? before finally hitting...Yes...

Most of us get to do this sometime early in our careers, and learn from it; but as computers have become more reliable, I've encountered many people who have never had this delightful experience until something like this happens.


I became a hero to a female neighbor because of this. We were socializing and she was extolling the convenience of keeping all of her stuff (writings, financial records) on her laptop. I asked her about backup, and she said "but the laptop has a 5 year warranty".

I gave her  a crash course in why you backup, and taught her how to burn stuff on CDs and to use internet storage personally (I believe in 3 levels of backup: another computer in the house, removable media kept out of the house, and the internet).

About 6 months later laptop goes for a swim in the ocean (long story)... was recovered but useless. With her backups (which she did on some regular basis) she didn't lose anything of importance. So now I can do no wrong in her eyes.
 
2013-04-25 07:50:33 AM  
Back-up data stories!!
Last year, I went away for a weekend with my laptop, so I could finish writing a review.
I was backing up on a USB drive - no internet access, so I couldn't access Dropbox.
Had my bag stolen on the way home -  with the laptop and USB.
Yeah.
On the bright-side, review mark 2 was most excellent.  Furthermore, it was submitted on time.  Sure, I didn't sleep for the next week, but submitted on time.

Also, I had so many copies of my thesis, I wasn't sure which version was finally sent for publication.  I'm still not sure.
 
2013-04-25 08:13:53 AM  
I feel for her. My HD just crashed a couple of weeks back. Machine locked up. I rebooted and it just sat at the loading screen. I tried safe mode and again, it got to the windows loading screen and stopped. I pulled the drive and mounted it as an external to another laptop, and to my horror it showed empty. I tried a data recovery program, it got half way through the scan and then *click click click*. I hadn't backed up my HD in 9 months. 10GB of anime porn just gone forever.

Worst thing was that just three days prior I was thinking "I hadn't backed up in a while, I really need to do that soon"
 
2013-04-25 08:32:53 AM  
Beowoolfie: I was there when both halves of a mirrored RAID failed within 15 minutes of one another.

In grad school we had a RAID fail due to a driver bug.  It corrupted all the data on the departmental server.  A Masters' student lost her thesis work.  Fortunately she had just submitted it for defense, but she wasn't able to publish later.  (The prof wouldn't publish any study he didn't have the source code to replicate.)  It all worked out in the end, because she took a job in industry and didn't need the publication, but it sucked.
 
2013-04-25 08:41:55 AM  
Has anyone mentioned yet that they should have backed up their data?
 
2013-04-25 09:29:45 AM  

qualtrough: I had the good fortune to learn this lesson very early. Back in the day I used one of the earliest word processors around that for some reason had a DELETE DEATH key that when inadvertently pressed would delete the entire document--no Y/N or Are you sure?--and with no restore option. Eventually I physically disabled the key with tape. And also learned to back up frequently.


In high school, I wrote papers using FontMaster 128 for the Commodore 128.  I turned out that a joystick plugged into port 2 would lock up the program if someone jiggled it or pressed the fire button at the right time.  It took me a while to figure this out, because my dad had bought a tiny keyboard-attached thumb joystick, and I would either bump it by accident, or fiddle with it when thinking about what to type.   Until I figured out the problem, I learned to save religiously.  Once I found the bug, I immediately reverted to my usual level of complete disregard for loss of data.
 
2013-04-25 10:17:18 AM  
what the fark Jersey radio station? posting that image without at least hiding the dude's contact information?
 
2013-04-25 11:26:53 AM  
Beowoolfie: I was there when both halves of a mirrored RAID failed within 15 minutes of one another.

IBM Deskstar (deathstar) drives made me add another layer to my backup plan.
 
2013-04-25 11:40:13 AM  
dickfreckle:

However, there were also love letters and tomes of fiction so awful that decorum prohibits me from mentioning them here. I can't even quote any of it for your amusement without wanting to stab my left eye with a fork.

Most of my life before turning 30 was like that. I want a do-over, dammit.
 
2013-04-25 11:43:37 AM  

djRykoSuave: Lt. Cheese Weasel:

You spend 5 years doing the shiat and not back it up? You're not worthy of a PhD in Social Science.

Rather, they are worthy of a PhD in social science


You're probably thinking of an MSW in Social Work.
 
2013-04-25 11:45:09 AM  

lordargent: Beowoolfie: I was there when both halves of a mirrored RAID failed within 15 minutes of one another.

IBM Deskstar (deathstar) drives made me add another layer to my backup plan.


Deathstar's failed, but goddamn they had the best performance.  Totally worth the risk if you had a backup plan or didn't care about the data
 
2013-04-25 11:51:52 AM  
MythDragon:

10GB of anime porn just gone forever.

WTF is the point of anime porn?

I prefer amateur POV myself. (EIP, y'all!)
 
2013-04-25 11:52:58 AM  

bhcompy: lordargent: Beowoolfie: I was there when both halves of a mirrored RAID failed within 15 minutes of one another.

IBM Deskstar (deathstar) drives made me add another layer to my backup plan.

Deathstar's failed, but goddamn they had the best performance.  Totally worth the risk if you had a backup plan or didn't care about the data


But as everyone knows, the Deathstars don't hold a candle to a true Enterprise class drive.
 
2013-04-25 11:59:27 AM  
How do people not know to back up now? I mean, I do it (probably not often enough) and the only thing of real value that absolutely could not be replaced without some effort or money is songs. The rest is just random crap. Pictures. Tax returns (maybe I should print those out, just in case). Stuff like that. Nothing that represents irreplaceable effort that would seriously put my work back for years if it was lost.

At least put the important shiat on a couple of jump drives and stick those somewhere safe.
 
2013-04-25 12:18:28 PM  
Has anybody mentioned how dumb it is to not back up your data?

Maybe I should have frozen some sperm before my vasectomy just in case somebody wanted an IVF mutant.
 
2013-04-25 12:20:44 PM  
I don't think I want this guy to have a Ph.D.  If he's too dumb to back up his data, he should fail.

CSB... I was a computer guy for a college here when a M.S. student had a flash drive failure.  She knocked on my door and said her drive wasn't working.  I plugged it in, got nothing.  Tried a different system, etc... never got a peep out of the thing.  We later found that the thing had somehow been subjected to some sort of serious physical impact, such that the flash chip was damaged and some of its connectors bent.  Weird.  Anyway, yeah... I told her to just get a new flash drive.  "No, you don't understand... I need that one!"  Story ends predictably... her only copy, no general backups, just a few documents she'd sent to profs and conferences via email.  Raw data, etc *completely* gone.  Not even on the original lab computers that generated it.  About 95% of 3 years of work down the crapper.  I told her about how to do backups.  Her response after a 15 minute explanation... "So... are there any flash drives that don't fail?  That all sounds really hard."
 
2013-04-25 12:43:09 PM  
I got a 32G flash drive for $30 bucks at Office Max the other day. I am by no means a doctoral candidate. I just have a measly Bachelor of Science from a State University.
 
2013-04-25 12:47:17 PM  

Realist29: I got a 32G flash drive for $30 bucks at Office Max the other day. I am by no means a doctoral candidate. I just have a measly Bachelor of Science from a State University.


But did you stay in a Holiday Inn last night?
 
2013-04-25 01:40:52 PM  

The One True TheDavid: MythDragon:

10GB of anime porn just gone forever.

WTF is the point of anime porn?

I prefer amateur POV myself. (EIP, y'all!)


I like anime, and I like porn. It's like chocolate and peanut butter.
I don't judge you for your tastes in things getting dicked.
I guess it's because there is wierd shiat like tentacles and demon monsters that carry 5 gallon reserve tanks of baby batter.
 
2013-04-25 02:12:06 PM  
If it was information Systems he would have already failed!
 
2013-04-25 03:01:44 PM  

lordargent: Beowoolfie: I was there when both halves of a mirrored RAID failed within 15 minutes of one another.

IBM Deskstar (deathstar) drives made me add another layer to my backup plan.


Yep, those were the drives!
 
2013-04-25 10:01:35 PM  

MythDragon: The One True TheDavid: MythDragon:

10GB of anime porn just gone forever.

WTF is the point of anime porn?

I guess it's because there is wierd shiat like tentacles and demon monsters that carry 5 gallon reserve tanks of baby batter.


I'll grant you that's cool, I just don't find it sexy. But then I'm weird.

Actually it wasn't until I got on the Net and looked at all the various types of porn and erotica that I realized how "vanilla" my tastes actually are. Damn. Add "pervert" to my long list of failures.
 
gja
2013-04-25 10:51:31 PM  

Beowoolfie: lordargent: Beowoolfie: I was there when both halves of a mirrored RAID failed within 15 minutes of one another.

IBM Deskstar (deathstar) drives made me add another layer to my backup plan.

Yep, those were the drives!


I would be laughing at that memory if I hadn't been forced to save so many collective azzes who had those drives and never backed up their stuff.
SIGH, you can't fix dumb.
 
2013-04-25 11:13:43 PM  

Tatterdemalian: Bisu: So what's the cheapest way to backup large quantities of data that you don't want transmitted over the internet? I backup in triplicate, and one copy is disconnected from my system, but a fire/tornado/flood/Godzilla could easily wipe out everything at once. The combination of slow internet (relative to drive speeds) and paranoia (not wanting my data physically available to others, even though it's all encrypted) makes online backups less than ideal for me.

Do you get eight hours of sleep a night?

Start the online backup last thing before you go to bed.

/if you don't get eight hours of sleep a night, you should
//unless you really intend to kill yourself before you reach 30, it will catch up to you


It would take a year and a half of non-stop uploading with my connection to transfer 10TB. so 4 1/2 years if I do it when I sleep. And like I said I don't like having a cloud service have access to my data. Sure it may be encrypted today, but what if Swordfish is cracked in 5 years? What if quantum computers make non-quantum encryption obsolete? Yes, I know nobody really cares about my midget porn, cat pictures, and personal memoirs, but I still don't want my data out there.
 
2013-04-25 11:34:32 PM  
gja : I would be laughing at that memory if I hadn't been forced to save so many collective azzes who had those drives and never backed up their stuff.
SIGH, you can't fix dumb.


I had two in a mirror, plus a boot disk.

One of the mirrors died after about 8 months, I RMAed it.
Got it back, rebuilt the array.

Second drive in the mirror died, about 6 months later, I RMAed it.
Got it back, rebuilt the array.

FIRST drive in the mirror (the replacement one) DIED about 6 months later.

At that point I said FARK THIS, and got a pair of new WD drives (with more capacity), then added an external drive as well.
 
gja
2013-04-25 11:41:22 PM  

lordargent: gja : I would be laughing at that memory if I hadn't been forced to save so many collective azzes who had those drives and never backed up their stuff.
SIGH, you can't fix dumb.

I had two in a mirror, plus a boot disk.

One of the mirrors died after about 8 months, I RMAed it.
Got it back, rebuilt the array.

Second drive in the mirror died, about 6 months later, I RMAed it.
Got it back, rebuilt the array.

FIRST drive in the mirror (the replacement one) DIED about 6 months later.

At that point I said FARK THIS, and got a pair of new WD drives (with more capacity), then added an external drive as well.


Yup, they SUCKED like a jet intake on run-up.
Gimme Seagtes. Good old Spin-4-eva's.
Especially their higher end SCSI stuff. They have motors that just wont die.

Currently I use a MBPro with an SSD drive. YIPEE, no movin parts!
 
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