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(ABC)   University of New Hampshire student athlete sacrifices his career to donate bone marrow   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 67
    More: Hero, New Hampshire, moral dilemmas  
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6669 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Apr 2013 at 10:13 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-24 09:19:50 AM
Not second guess his decision, but if he took the money he would have made from all those million-dollar major-league shot put deals thrown at him and put it toward research, the guy might not need bone marrow.  That stuff would be cured.  The New York Albatrosses would have given him a blank check.  They've got the money and they need the talent.  It's a shame, I was hoping they'd have a chance to bring home the old Grant Cup home next year.
 
2013-04-24 10:06:36 AM
<standing ovation>
 
2013-04-24 10:15:30 AM
University of Southern New Hampshire athlete...better than a University of Phoenix athlete? How about a Career Services Corporation athlete or a DeVry athlete?
 
2013-04-24 10:17:30 AM
Is it dusty in here?
 
2013-04-24 10:19:34 AM
Hey now Subby, he's an athlete at a real school, the University of New Hampshire.  Not some imaginary bastardization of UNH and Southern New Hampshire University.
 
2013-04-24 10:19:49 AM
Good story.  I hope life is kind to both donor and donee.
 
2013-04-24 10:20:41 AM
Well done and good for him and all, but being a track star at good ole SNHU isn't quite the path to future fame and fortune that the headline implies.  This is slightly more remarkable than a regular student at a small university doing the same thing, but only slightly.
 
2013-04-24 10:21:40 AM
He's a gentle giant," Sciacca said of her 6-foot-2-inch, 255-pound son. "He'll do anything for anybody."

If he ever goes to prison he'll never run out of cigarettes, which is nice.
 
2013-04-24 10:22:19 AM
Um, someone tell him they don't have to drill into your bones anymore.  They can give you a couple of shots a day for a week, and then apheresis for a couple days to draw out the stem cells.

I did this at the beginning of March for my brother.  I down from athletics for about a week and only out of pocket from work for one day.
 
2013-04-24 10:24:28 AM
"It was kind of a no-brainer for a decent human," Lyle said.

...which is why someone actually making that choice is national news.  Sad state of the world.
 
2013-04-24 10:24:43 AM
Just for kicks:  UNH.  Not Southern.  Relative to New Hampshire's size, UNH is pretty far north, closer to the Maine border than Massachusetts.
He's from Plaistow, which borders Massachussetts.  It's one of those "can't get there from here" towns, where you can't get to Plaistow, NH while in New Hampshire, you have to get there through Massachusetts.  Yes, it's a silly exaggeration.
Anyways, good on him.
 
2013-04-24 10:25:08 AM

staplermofo: the guy might not need bone marrow.


That guy has late stage ALL, he wouldn't need the bone marrow in a few years because he'd be dead.

Also, he shortened this season, but he should be fully recovered from donating marrow in a couple months at the longest.  It's not like he has to give up all athletic aspirations now.
 
2013-04-24 10:25:46 AM
he won't be able to lift 20 lb above his head for ever, or just for the remainder of this season? it feels like they carefully don't clarify that
 
2013-04-24 10:27:25 AM
Back when I was saving the world as a college student in the mid-90s (you're welcome, world) I got caught up in organizing one of these "get yourself on the bone marrow registry" drives. At the time, this was how that worked.

1. Show up during one specific hour-long period when the bone marrow organization's nurse can show up to draw your blood. None of this wimpy cheek-swabbing, you get a needle.

2. Pay out of your (the donor's) pocket a $20 processing fee. ("Oh, you want to maybe theoretically save a life, do you? Well, it's going to cost you this week's beer money.")

3. Go home, secure in the knowledge that there's virtually no chance they'll need your marrow, and if they do, it probably won't be before the end of the year when you change campus housing and therefore your phone number, meaning the one piece of contact information they have for you will be out of date.

Somehow we got like a hundred people to show up for that. The lesson I learned was, "college students are incredibly easy to manipulate." And it's  Professor semiotix to you, now.
 
2013-04-24 10:27:54 AM

LagerVsAle: Hey now Subby, he's an athlete at a real school, the University of New Hampshire.  Not some imaginary bastardization of UNH and Southern New Hampshire University.


My bad, I thought it was University of Southern New Hampshire

/I should've known better since I applied there way back when
//subby
 
2013-04-24 10:27:55 AM
Farking autoplay video... with an ad in front... that cannot be stopped/paused/anything.  WTF?

staplermofo: Not second guess his decision, but if he took the money he would have made from all those million-dollar major-league shot put deals thrown at him and put it toward research, the guy might not need bone marrow.  That stuff would be cured.  The New York Albatrosses would have given him a blank check.  They've got the money and they need the talent.  It's a shame, I was hoping they'd have a chance to bring home the old Grant Cup home next year.


lol
 
2013-04-24 10:28:23 AM
A noble act. bravo.

/ mighty dusty.
 
2013-04-24 10:29:08 AM
I agree with the above posts that donating bone marrow is not exactly "sacrificing his career" anymore.
 
2013-04-24 10:30:28 AM

Lady J: he won't be able to lift 20 lb above his head for ever, or just for the remainder of this season?


It doesn't cripple you or anything, but it does involve drilling through the surface of your hip bones, which makes you gimpy for a few weeks. Even if he could play through the pain it's probably not safe to be shot-putting on a weakened pelvic girdle.

He'll be fine. It's just bad timing, is all.
 
2013-04-24 10:30:47 AM
Nevermind all the others who do and have done this and other acts of donating organs and tissue; he a starting athlete, he deserves a story.....
 
2013-04-24 10:31:38 AM
After all of the misused "Hero" tags lately I was beginning to doubt I would ever see one I could agree with again. Whew! Thank you sir! You truly are an inspiration. This is the type of person / athlete kids should be taught is heroic.
 
2013-04-24 10:32:36 AM

Lady J: he won't be able to lift 20 lb above his head for ever, or just for the remainder of this season? it feels like they carefully don't clarify that


He's just out for the rest of the season, but since he's a senior, that's the end of it.  The thing is, he's a shot-put and hammer throw athlete. These are not pro sports, so while he is technically ending his "athletic career", it's not like he's forgoing millions of dollars.  He's missing out on some trophies.  It IS a sacrifice, of course.  And he is a good person for doing this, but he's not giving up on an NFL career to donate bone marrow.
 
2013-04-24 10:33:33 AM

semiotix: Lady J: he won't be able to lift 20 lb above his head for ever, or just for the remainder of this season?

It doesn't cripple you or anything, but it does involve drilling through the surface of your hip bones, which makes you gimpy for a few weeks. Even if he could play through the pain it's probably not safe to be shot-putting on a weakened pelvic girdle.

He'll be fine. It's just bad timing, is all.


But as she asked, is that for the rest of his life or just a few months? I would consider donating but if it meant I couldn't lift any more then I would have to pass unless it was a family member.
 
2013-04-24 10:33:42 AM

graeth: Nevermind all the others who do and have done this and other acts of donating organs and tissue; he a starting athlete, he deserves a story.....


Yes. People donate for family and relatives all the time.

The odds against finding a non-family bone marrow match, and that he's doing it for a stranger, are the interesting parts.
 
2013-04-24 10:35:32 AM

scarmig: Um, someone tell him they don't have to drill into your bones anymore.  They can give you a couple of shots a day for a week, and then apheresis for a couple days to draw out the stem cells.

I did this at the beginning of March for my brother.  I down from athletics for about a week and only out of pocket from work for one day.


The donor gets to choose but they still use both options.  Some doctors have a preference depending on the condition and age of the patient.

Also, that's awesome!
 
2013-04-24 10:35:50 AM
Appropriate use of the hero tag?  What's this nonsense?
 
2013-04-24 10:37:08 AM

graeth: Nevermind all the others who do and have done this and other acts of donating organs and tissue; he a starting athlete, he deserves a story.....


get back in that locker, dweeb
 
2013-04-24 10:37:47 AM

steamingpile: But as she asked, is that for the rest of his life or just a few months? I would consider donating but if it meant I couldn't lift any more then I would have to pass unless it was a family member.


Consult a real doctor, but I'm 99.999% certain that it's strictly temporary.
 
2013-04-24 10:40:18 AM
My step father has given bone marrow to total strangers a number of times.
He also has given more than 1,000 units  of blood at more than one hospital over the years.

/One of the nicest, most selfless guys I've ever met
 
2013-04-24 10:41:23 AM
applause.jpg
 
2013-04-24 10:41:30 AM
I would still donate even if it wasnt a family member and even if I'd have to give up my school athletics 'career', as long as the person was getting a reasonable new lease of life. id deserve the hero tag more than this guy though (who still does deserve the hero tag)

id better get a Fark thread as well
 
2013-04-24 10:44:38 AM
FTFA:  Lyle was told that the man only has six months to live without the transplant.

Also FTFA:  Lyle said. "I couldn't imagine just waiting. He could have been waiting for years for a match. . ."

Years?  I don't think so.
 
2013-04-24 10:45:55 AM
zepher

My step father has given bone marrow to total strangers a number of times.
He also has given more than 1,000 units  of blood at more than one hospital over the years.

/One of the nicest, most selfless guys I've ever met


it'd be a different story if you were red headed. count yourself lucky
 
2013-04-24 10:46:23 AM
To those in the thread considering/wavering on adding yourself to the bone marrow registry, I should note an additional semi-benfit: In the event that you are a *potential* match, they request some blood samples so they can both a) Do a more thorough check, and B) make sure, if you are a match, you aren't about to gift the recipient lyme/another form of cancer/some inhereited gentic disease (since, well, you'll be giving stem cells/bone marrow: Which means you *could* gift them a  genetic disorder).

But they also, I'm pretty sure, *tell you* if they find anything wrong in part B). I've been a potential match twice-both times, either the patient became to ill to recieve a transplant at the time, or I wasn't a good enough match.

While the odds of matching a potential stranger are low, there's a crapton of folks in this country.

staplermofo: Not second guess his decision, but if he took the money he would have made from all those million-dollar major-league shot put deals thrown at him and put it toward research, the guy might not need bone marrow.  That stuff would be cured.  The New York Albatrosses would have given him a blank check.  They've got the money and they need the talent.  It's a shame, I was hoping they'd have a chance to bring home the old Grant Cup home next year.


Um. Donating bone marrow IS the cure for most types of Lukemia. As in, it is, literally, *the way you cure it*.

steamingpile: semiotix: Lady J: he won't be able to lift 20 lb above his head for ever, or just for the remainder of this season?

It doesn't cripple you or anything, but it does involve drilling through the surface of your hip bones, which makes you gimpy for a few weeks. Even if he could play through the pain it's probably not safe to be shot-putting on a weakened pelvic girdle.

He'll be fine. It's just bad timing, is all.

But as she asked, is that for the rest of his life or just a few months? I would consider donating but if it meant I couldn't lift any more then I would have to pass unless it was a family member.


I am almost 100% it's not permanently crippling. PLus, there's a secondary method these days that doesn't involve bone drilling (though I *am* told you feel like you have a mild flu for a week or two. I haven't been a full match yet myself).
 
2013-04-24 10:49:17 AM
Good story, regardless of how quick the doner should be able to bounce back the fact is he's making an effort to save a strangers life.  How many people would simply turn the other cheek?  Great job Cameron!
 
2013-04-24 10:50:25 AM

Nana's Vibrator: Just for kicks:  UNH.  Not Southern.  Relative to New Hampshire's size, UNH is pretty far north, closer to the Maine border than Massachusetts.
He's from Plaistow, which borders Massachussetts.  It's one of those "can't get there from here" towns, where you can't get to Plaistow, NH while in New Hampshire, you have to get there through Massachusetts.  Yes, it's a silly exaggeration.
Anyways, good on him.


???

Sure, it's closer to Maine than Mass, but it's still in southern NH.
www.bestplaces.net

/UNH Class of '05
 
2013-04-24 10:51:07 AM

semiotix: steamingpile: But as she asked, is that for the rest of his life or just a few months? I would consider donating but if it meant I couldn't lift any more then I would have to pass unless it was a family member.

Consult a real doctor, but I'm 99.999% certain that it's strictly temporary.


Its would be worth it then, would you know who are donating to or is it 100% anonymous?
 
2013-04-24 10:55:43 AM
This guy is a track and field dude?  You keep using that word career.
 
2013-04-24 10:57:04 AM

steamingpile: semiotix: steamingpile: But as she asked, is that for the rest of his life or just a few months? I would consider donating but if it meant I couldn't lift any more then I would have to pass unless it was a family member.

Consult a real doctor, but I'm 99.999% certain that it's strictly temporary.

Its would be worth it then, would you know who are donating to or is it 100% anonymous?


Pretty sure it's 100% anonymous due to HIPAA.
 
2013-04-24 11:00:55 AM
Decent human being decides that shot put isn't such an important deal anyway and helps somebody out.

I like that guy. We should send him some beer after he does bone marrow transplant.
 
2013-04-24 11:03:58 AM

Felgraf: steamingpile: semiotix: steamingpile: But as she asked, is that for the rest of his life or just a few months? I would consider donating but if it meant I couldn't lift any more then I would have to pass unless it was a family member.

Consult a real doctor, but I'm 99.999% certain that it's strictly temporary.

Its would be worth it then, would you know who are donating to or is it 100% anonymous?

Pretty sure it's 100% anonymous due to HIPAA.


Well the guy getting this specific transplant might be able to guess, since this kid is in the newspaper and all. However, it states right in the article (yeah, I know, reading is for dorks) that after a mandatory year they can both sign waivers if they wish to exchange information.
 
2013-04-24 11:04:40 AM

steamingpile: semiotix: steamingpile: But as she asked, is that for the rest of his life or just a few months? I would consider donating but if it meant I couldn't lift any more then I would have to pass unless it was a family member.

Consult a real doctor, but I'm 99.999% certain that it's strictly temporary.

Its would be worth it then, would you know who are donating to or is it 100% anonymous?


I think they give you the option of knowing. They also give you the option of knowing whether or not they survived, it's not always a guarantee.

I'm on the registry, haven't been called yet. My heart jumps into my throat, without fail, every damn time I get their email newsletter.
 
2013-04-24 11:05:34 AM

LagerVsAle: Hey now Subby, he's an athlete at a real school, the University of New Hampshire.  Not some imaginary bastardization of UNH and Southern New Hampshire University.


Not part of the UNH.  It was New Hampshire College.

NeoCortex42: Nana's Vibrator: Just for kicks:  UNH.  Not Southern.  Relative to New Hampshire's size, UNH is pretty far north, closer to the Maine border than Massachusetts.
He's from Plaistow, which borders Massachussetts.  It's one of those "can't get there from here" towns, where you can't get to Plaistow, NH while in New Hampshire, you have to get there through Massachusetts.  Yes, it's a silly exaggeration.
Anyways, good on him.

???

Sure, it's closer to Maine than Mass, but it's still in southern NH.
[www.bestplaces.net image 264x264]

/UNH Class of '05


Northern New Hampshire is just woods and ski areas.
 
2013-04-24 11:06:15 AM
That's a cool story, I got put on the bone marrow registry at UNH myself a few years ago in the same program.  Glad the UNH was able to get a hit, might get more people to register.
 
2013-04-24 11:12:51 AM
This story should be shown to every school athlete and coach concerned about rapists losing out on an athletic career for jail time.
 
2013-04-24 11:17:48 AM

scarmig: Um, someone tell him they don't have to drill into your bones anymore.  They can give you a couple of shots a day for a week, and then apheresis for a couple days to draw out the stem cells.

I did this at the beginning of March for my brother.  I down from athletics for about a week and only out of pocket from work for one day.


I get the impression that there are reasons to go the holes-in-bones route sometimes-- perhaps the subclass of the disease or doctor preference. I did the pheresis version myself a few years ago... it was pretty rough too, but I think the side effects were rough for me. They give shots for a week to induce stem cells into the blood stream. I turned into the princess and the pea, laying on pillows and blankets in my living room, marathoning babylon 5. Still worth it.

It's free to join the registry now, and you can do it by mail with a cheek swab. You also might not be in the registry even if you think you are; I wasn't. You can join or find out more at marrow.org.
 
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-04-24 11:23:14 AM
img1.fark.netSomeone Does The Right Thing For Once.

A news flash tag WAS warranted.
 
2013-04-24 11:29:41 AM
You can have my bone marrow when you pry it from my cold dead hands.
 
2013-04-24 11:29:54 AM

Mateorocks: University of Southern New Hampshire athlete...better than a University of Phoenix athlete? How about a Career Services Corporation athlete or a DeVry athlete?


I don't think they're quite the same.  SNHU is private but non-profit still, last time I looked.
 
2013-04-24 11:30:37 AM
Having just gone through the non-drill method, let me lay it out, for all you folks who are not signed up as donors yet.

1.  You get two shots a day for five days.  They are subcutaneous, like an allergy shot, in the arms.  They are slow shots that take maybe 30 seconds to a minute each.
2.  You feel okay the first day.  You feel worse each subsequent day.  For me, the bones of my skull, chest, and pelvis began to ache.
3.  You can take pain relievers.  None of it was bad enough that I missed any work.  The worse is that around day 2 my balls started to ache as a side effect of the bone pain.  Not terrible, but not comfortable.
4.  Come day four, my knees were weak.  If I sneezed, they kinda buckled.  I could still work, just had to be careful, and I didn't take any stairs.
5.  Day five is the apheresis.  You show up on time, having taken a lot of calcium the night before.  Limit liquids, because peeing with tubes in your arms is a pain.  I was hooked up for five hours.  After the initial work to get me set up, it was boring.  You will not be able to move one of your arms, as they have to leave the needle in.
6.  They finish that day with two more flogistin shots, in case they need you to come back the next day.
7.  That night, they called with the results, and did not get as many stem cells as they doctor wanted, so I went back the next day to do it again.
8.  The bone pain from the flogistin shots receded almost immediately, though I took on day after the apheresis to rest, and I have no long term effects.
9.  If the recipient is ready, the take the bags straight up to the patient, and hook them up, no processing or anything, fresh from the cow.  If the recipient is not ready, they freeze it for later.  In my case, I literally unhooked the second day, and went upstairs a couple of hours later and watched them hook up my bag of juice to my brother and open it up.

He's cured now, though he has a long road of rebuilding an immune system in front of him.
 
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