Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Calgary Herald)   Ben Affleck will attempt to keep his food and drink costs below $1.50 for at least one day. In other news, they have free sandwiches on movie sets   (calgaryherald.com) divider line 65
    More: Interesting, Ben Affleck, Debi Mazar, Sophia Bush, Josh Groban, raising awareness, Oscar winner, Argo  
•       •       •

2938 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 24 Apr 2013 at 7:42 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



65 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-04-24 07:49:05 AM  
I was doing this Showtime movie, Hot Ice with Anne Archer, never once touched my per diem. I'd go to Craft Service, get some raw veggies, bacon, Cup-A-Soup... baby, I got a stew going.
 
2013-04-24 07:54:23 AM  
www.blogcdn.com
 
2013-04-24 07:55:38 AM  
If you're Ben affleck, dumbasses all over will give him food thinking he'll thank them in his next oscar speech, let's face it.

These stunts, like spending a night outside raising awareness of homelessness, is for the Attention Whores, and thus perfect for Hollywood actors.
 
2013-04-24 07:58:53 AM  
He just wants his kids back.
t0.gstatic.com
 
2013-04-24 08:01:39 AM  

GungFu: If you're Ben affleck, dumbasses all over will give him food thinking he'll thank them in his next oscar speech, let's face it.

These stunts, like spending a night outside raising awareness of homelessness, is for the Attention Whores, and thus perfect for Hollywood actors.



I remember a group that spent one night homeless. Before they went out to the park, they had a big buffet luncheon. They never realized that spending a night outside after stuffing your face is closer to camping than it is homelessness.
 
2013-04-24 08:09:44 AM  
In the US, where 1.50$ will get you a sandwich and a half at McDonalds, or in one of the nations where 1.50$ a day is a standard wage, where it'll get you a full meal and cover your rent, and maybe some cheap beer or liquor?

Basically, how ignorant is this awareness campaign regarding personal economics?
 
2013-04-24 08:26:16 AM  
Marie Antoinette wanted to play at being a peasant so her husband had a fake village built and he commanded workers from the area to drop their kids off so that Marie could have the full peasant experience. I hope that when the revolution comes, someone will have the presence of mind to reenact Affleck's post-death scene from Smoking Aces.
 
2013-04-24 08:28:17 AM  
He doesn't even need food. He feeds on attention.
 
2013-04-24 08:28:47 AM  
Seems kind of condescending.
 
2013-04-24 08:31:04 AM  
Affleck added, "Look at me!  LOOK AT ME!"
 
2013-04-24 08:32:27 AM  

mekkab: I was doing this Showtime movie, Hot Ice with Anne Archer, never once touched my per diem. I'd go to Craft Service, get some raw veggies, bacon, Cup-A-Soup... baby, I got a stew going.


CarnySaur: He just wants his kids back.
[t0.gstatic.com image 300x168]


This is why I read the comments on fark.  I wasn't even expecting an Arrested Development reference, and boom, two of them within the Boobiess.
 
2013-04-24 08:32:52 AM  
cheap symbolism
 
2013-04-24 08:36:39 AM  
I once had $0.00 food costs for one day. I deserve a Nobel Peace Prize.
 
2013-04-24 08:37:26 AM  
Is he going to give the difference to actual poor people? No? Then Argo-fugyerself Ben.
 
2013-04-24 08:40:10 AM  

Jim_Callahan: In the US, where 1.50$ will get you a sandwich and a half at McDonalds, or in one of the nations where 1.50$ a day is a standard wage, where it'll get you a full meal and cover your rent, and maybe some cheap beer or liquor?

Basically, how ignorant is this awareness campaign regarding personal economics?


1.05$ US in poor countries is probably equivalent to what Ben Afleck normally spends, to be honest.

/He should have to be chased by a machete weilding mob before and after every meal.
//For realism.
//Afleck was the bomb in Phantoms, yo.
 
2013-04-24 08:41:52 AM  
photos.posh24.com

How will he cope?
 
2013-04-24 08:43:45 AM  
How dare that wealthy son of a biatch participate in a poverty awareness campaign. He should be... wait... What's with the outrage?
 
2013-04-24 08:44:06 AM  

AiryAnne: [photos.posh24.com image 506x305]

How will he cope?


Came here to post that. And then to ask if he was going to pay his rent/ mortgage/ insurance/ bills/ children's requirements on these days.

/ Whelp... ok.
 
2013-04-24 08:48:56 AM  

Uranus Is Huge!: How dare that wealthy son of a biatch participate in a poverty awareness campaign. He should be... wait... What's with the outrage?


Yeah, the nerve of that guy, not rubbing his wealth and hot wife in our faces!

Affleck, I demand you rub your hot wife in my face!
 
2013-04-24 08:59:52 AM  
I can't even get a bottled drink for under $2 lately.
 
2013-04-24 09:01:42 AM  
Christ, what an asshole.
 
2013-04-24 09:06:24 AM  

nicoffeine: I once had $0.00 food costs for one day. I deserve a Nobel Peace Prize.


About four days every week I have $0.00 food costs. The other days I go shopping.
 
2013-04-24 09:12:19 AM  
$1.50 will get you 8 packages of top ramen.  What a farking pig.
 
2013-04-24 09:26:35 AM  
Zombies eat for $0.00 every single day.  This is nothing new.
 
2013-04-24 09:28:14 AM  
I can't figure out whether it's cool to hate Ben Affleck or like him lately!
 
2013-04-24 09:37:21 AM  

Bruce Campbell: $1.50 will get you 8 packages of top ramen.  What a farking pig.


It'll get you twice as much bottom ramen.
 
2013-04-24 09:49:38 AM  
If you shop for it in a week, there are things you can do -- rice ($0.40 a pound), canned veggies ($0.50 a can), dry beans ($0.30 a pound) mix together to get a rather nutritious meal super, super cheap.  Milk in these parts is around $2.50 a gallon, which is easily enough for a week.  Bread is about $1 a loaf.  Peanut butter can be as cheap as $1.50 a jar.  Spaghetti is cheap.  I'm not saying that it's super easy or tasty to go super cheap, but you can absolutely live on $1.50 per person per day.
 
2013-04-24 09:49:39 AM  
If you're living on $1.50 a day, chances are you farked up at some point in your life
 
2013-04-24 09:57:54 AM  
csb time

Lived in Tanzania doing the Peace Corp thing, got $6 / day living allowance, got chapati for a dime in the morning, free lunch at the school (ugali and beans) and a bowl of rice and beans for $0.40 for dinner.  How about them apples?

//ok, I did spend most of the rest of the six bucks on beer
 
2013-04-24 10:11:38 AM  

coeyagi: csb time

Lived in Tanzania doing the Peace Corp thing, got $6 / day living allowance, got chapati for a dime in the morning, free lunch at the school (ugali and beans) and a bowl of rice and beans for $0.40 for dinner.  How about them apples?

//ok, I did spend most of the rest of the six bucks on beer


Congratulations, you have more life experience than most of Tarzania.

/cheap yuks
 
2013-04-24 10:12:16 AM  
I could live on $0 for a day if I knew my next day's breakfast was going to be prepared by my personal French chef.
 
2013-04-24 10:13:21 AM  

meanmutton: If you shop for it in a week, there are things you can do -- rice ($0.40 a pound), canned veggies ($0.50 a can), dry beans ($0.30 a pound) mix together to get a rather nutritious meal super, super cheap.  Milk in these parts is around $2.50 a gallon, which is easily enough for a week.  Bread is about $1 a loaf.  Peanut butter can be as cheap as $1.50 a jar.  Spaghetti is cheap.  I'm not saying that it's super easy or tasty to go super cheap, but you can absolutely live on $1.50 per person per day.


When I was in my last year at college, I got it down to $1.68 per day - and it wasn't pretty. A lot of my food came from the cast-off and dented-can bin at the local store, but mostly I lived off the old USDA program that sold surplus food stocks along with providing food stamps. I never qualified for stamps, but anyone could walk into the store and buy whatever was on offer.

The cheese and peanut butter that USDA used to sell was just farking awful. The cheese was either hard as a rock, in which case I would grate it over whatever pasta was on sale at the Piggly-Wiggly that week, or it was this oily substance that looked and tasted like petroleum jelly. That's the stuff of "government cheese" fame. Occasionally they would have sliced American cheese, which of course is tasteless and nutrition-free, but it makes a good filler on a sandwich made with week-old bread and sardines.

The "smooth" peanut butter was the consistency of wallboard putty, but the crunchy variety was edible. They came in gallon cans and once that can was open, it was a race to eat as much as you could before it got as hard as a rock.

Most of my bread came from the day-old store but a minute or two in the toaster would fix that right up. There was a hippie bakery in town that sold whole grain bread out the back door to bums, grad students, and other lowlifes for a nickel a loaf at the end of the day. Since there was no preservatives, it started getting moldy within a day or so and it was often starting to mold when I got it. I learned to slice it, toast it, put it in a plastic bag and store it in a cool place.

The USDA also used to sell strawberry jam that was actually pretty good, I would grab a can of that whenever it was on the shelf. There was also a strawberry jelly, but the locals referred to it as "Red Death" and said it was only good for curing constipation.

Speaking of constipation, the "surplus store" also sold dried prunes by the 2-lb bag. You could stew these to make them soft and it wasn't bad for breakfast, but one of the guys showed me how to make "prune-o" which of course is a sort of jailhouse wine. It's not bad, especially if you've had a long week and looking forward to a little buzz on a Friday night.

"Living on the dog" is an interesting experience but the key is this: I knew it was a temporary thing. I knew that within six months I would have a degree in hand and I'd be off to earning enough money to walk into the grocery store instead of getting day-old bread at the back door. I don't fool myself by thinking it was somehow ennobling to live that cheap. I sometimes wonder about the guys I met hanging around that back door. Many are probably still doing it, if they are still alive.
 
2013-04-24 10:14:33 AM  
offtherecordsports.com

Can I get just one rib?
 
2013-04-24 10:25:54 AM  

meanmutton: If you shop for it in a week, there are things you can do -- rice ($0.40 a pound), canned veggies ($0.50 a can), dry beans ($0.30 a pound) mix together to get a rather nutritious meal super, super cheap.  Milk in these parts is around $2.50 a gallon, which is easily enough for a week.  Bread is about $1 a loaf.  Peanut butter can be as cheap as $1.50 a jar.  Spaghetti is cheap.  I'm not saying that it's super easy or tasty to go super cheap, but you can absolutely live on $1.50 per person per day.


Holy crap your groceries are cheap. I pay about two and a half times what you pay for stuff. But I'm in Ontario. Milk is 3.69/litre, bread is about $3 a loaf, canned veggies are $0.89 for the non-name brand small can on sale.
 
2013-04-24 10:27:54 AM  
Will that mean he'll be eating and drinking out of garbage cans at the closest Greyhound bus station?
 
2013-04-24 10:41:26 AM  
Banana for breakfast: 40 cents
Ramen noodle package (chicken flavor) for lunch: 35 cents
Can of tuna for dinner: 60 cents

Geez... We're done already, and what are we up to, 1100 calories? I don't know how you can get it much cheaper than that.
 
2013-04-24 10:42:16 AM  
i35.tinypic.com

So he'll do it for a couple of days, and say it was hard.
 
2013-04-24 10:54:52 AM  
You want a real challenge?  Try doing $1.50 a day, or even double that, without eating anything whose ingredients are subsidized by the US government or traveled more than 100 miles to get to you (on the assumption that infrastructure is subsidized as well).

The true cost of food is quite different than what we pay at the register.
 
2013-04-24 10:57:22 AM  
I was homeless for awhile (car homeless, living in my '84 Honda Prelude...it was my own fault) and I lived on like $1 a day.

For breakfast I'd stroll into a Hampton Inn or Embassy Suites, fill up on cereal and yogurt, then walk out "while my room was being cleaned."

For lunch I'd splurge on a loaf of French bread and a Big K soda.

Dinner I'd eat at the pizza places I was working at.

All in all, wasn't that bad, but I had the advantages over most homeless of having a car, having a job, and having my sanity.
 
2013-04-24 11:14:00 AM  
Here's how I'd do it:

Stock up at the bulk grain section of Whole Foods:

1 lb of oatmeal is about $1.50. That will last a week or two. (I already just eat that for breakfast every day).
Buy a few pounds of dried black beans and kidney beans. Very cheap and high in protein.
Finally, I'd stock up on barely -- healthier than rice and as cheap.

The rest of the diet would be fruits and vegetables, but I'd buy them from the carts on sidewalks -- cheapest prices by far on produce.
 
2013-04-24 11:40:07 AM  

Jim_Callahan: In the US, where 1.50$ will get you a sandwich and a half at McDonalds, or in one of the nations where 1.50$ a day is a standard wage, where it'll get you a full meal and cover your rent, and maybe some cheap beer or liquor?

Basically, how ignorant is this awareness campaign regarding personal economics?


Lets see, Costco ... eggs around 0.12~0.15 per egg, 10lbs of oatmeal, ~$7.00.  Can toss in a few extras and still eat fairly decent on $1.50 a day.  There's a lot of good, cheap food.  Just need to avoid the convenience of eating out.
 
2013-04-24 11:41:34 AM  
300reviews.com
 
2013-04-24 11:44:49 AM  

Feral_and_Preposterous: Bruce Campbell: $1.50 will get you 8 packages of top ramen.  What a farking pig.

It'll get you twice as much bottom ramen.


I get a lot of free bottom ramming behind the Costco's over by the...

oh...you mean, bottom ramen.

Never mind.
 
2013-04-24 12:33:35 PM  
So, he's trading places with casey for the day?
 
2013-04-24 01:00:56 PM  
FTA is, like, the shortest article evar.
 
2013-04-24 01:08:07 PM  

Bedstead Polisher: meanmutton: If you shop for it in a week, there are things you can do -- rice ($0.40 a pound), canned veggies ($0.50 a can), dry beans ($0.30 a pound) mix together to get a rather nutritious meal super, super cheap.  Milk in these parts is around $2.50 a gallon, which is easily enough for a week.  Bread is about $1 a loaf.  Peanut butter can be as cheap as $1.50 a jar.  Spaghetti is cheap.  I'm not saying that it's super easy or tasty to go super cheap, but you can absolutely live on $1.50 per person per day.

Holy crap your groceries are cheap. I pay about two and a half times what you pay for stuff. But I'm in Ontario. Milk is 3.69/litre, bread is about $3 a loaf, canned veggies are $0.89 for the non-name brand small can on sale.


No kidding! I live in freakin' Alabama and milk is at least $3.50 a gallon (store brand) and even the cheap white bread is at least $2.00. Store brand canned goods are almost a dollar.
 
2013-04-24 01:20:58 PM  
A few celebrities a doing this. I work at a food pantry, both Matt Damon work for food insecurity. It brings attention to the cause which is not a bad thing. I believe he also works for some group in Eastern Congo too. He's okay. Let's see some of you Cheeto eaters try it, I know I couldn't.
 
2013-04-24 01:31:47 PM  

Bedstead Polisher: meanmutton: If you shop for it in a week, there are things you can do -- rice ($0.40 a pound), canned veggies ($0.50 a can), dry beans ($0.30 a pound) mix together to get a rather nutritious meal super, super cheap.  Milk in these parts is around $2.50 a gallon, which is easily enough for a week.  Bread is about $1 a loaf.  Peanut butter can be as cheap as $1.50 a jar.  Spaghetti is cheap.  I'm not saying that it's super easy or tasty to go super cheap, but you can absolutely live on $1.50 per person per day.

Holy crap your groceries are cheap. I pay about two and a half times what you pay for stuff. But I'm in Ontario. Milk is 3.69/litre, bread is about $3 a loaf, canned veggies are $0.89 for the non-name brand small can on sale.


In the US, combinations of heavy subsidies and grocery stores using staples as loss-leaders mean that milk, eggs, and bread tend to be rather cheap.

$3.69/l for milk, though???  Amazing that anyone drinks it at that price.
 
2013-04-24 01:35:05 PM  

Bedstead Polisher: meanmutton: If you shop for it in a week, there are things you can do -- rice ($0.40 a pound), canned veggies ($0.50 a can), dry beans ($0.30 a pound) mix together to get a rather nutritious meal super, super cheap.  Milk in these parts is around $2.50 a gallon, which is easily enough for a week.  Bread is about $1 a loaf.  Peanut butter can be as cheap as $1.50 a jar.  Spaghetti is cheap.  I'm not saying that it's super easy or tasty to go super cheap, but you can absolutely live on $1.50 per person per day.

Holy crap your groceries are cheap. I pay about two and a half times what you pay for stuff. But I'm in Ontario. Milk is 3.69/litre, bread is about $3 a loaf, canned veggies are $0.89 for the non-name brand small can on sale.


I'm in Ontario too, but milk isn't that expensive if you buy bagged.  $4.19 at any Shopper's for 4L.  Bread is $2.50ish on sale every week at one of the grocery stores.  Canned veggies look right, but frozen tend to be cheaper on sale anyways.

If you live north of Sudbury, it is your own fault that none of this applies.
 
2013-04-24 01:37:52 PM  

jackieeeee: Bedstead Polisher: meanmutton: If you shop for it in a week, there are things you can do -- rice ($0.40 a pound), canned veggies ($0.50 a can), dry beans ($0.30 a pound) mix together to get a rather nutritious meal super, super cheap.  Milk in these parts is around $2.50 a gallon, which is easily enough for a week.  Bread is about $1 a loaf.  Peanut butter can be as cheap as $1.50 a jar.  Spaghetti is cheap.  I'm not saying that it's super easy or tasty to go super cheap, but you can absolutely live on $1.50 per person per day.

Holy crap your groceries are cheap. I pay about two and a half times what you pay for stuff. But I'm in Ontario. Milk is 3.69/litre, bread is about $3 a loaf, canned veggies are $0.89 for the non-name brand small can on sale.

No kidding! I live in freakin' Alabama and milk is at least $3.50 a gallon (store brand) and even the cheap white bread is at least $2.00. Store brand canned goods are almost a dollar.


Maybe it's the shipping for Alabama?  There's not a lot of dairy farming in the South, is there?  Or maybe just not a lot of competition for grocery business?  I do know that eggs at my Kroger go for $0.99 a dozen, gallon milk is $2.49, and cheap-ass bread is $1.00 even.
 
Displayed 50 of 65 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report