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(USA Today)   Hubble image of that Comet that shall wipe out life on Earth in December 2013   (usatoday.com) divider line 54
    More: Cool, life, Hubble, comets, telescopes, Comet ISON, imaging science, Jupiter, Planetary Science Institute  
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6586 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Apr 2013 at 7:52 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-23 07:59:01 PM
Good, I still have time to start a cult before it gets here.
 
2013-04-23 08:06:01 PM
This crap again?
 
2013-04-23 08:11:01 PM
A comet as bright as a full moon? That must be amazing to see. I may just use this as an excuse to finally get a telescope.
 
2013-04-23 08:12:59 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?


This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?
 
2013-04-23 08:14:38 PM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


I like to think that it's bacon.
 
2013-04-23 08:17:54 PM
Thanks subby. I want more information! More!
 
2013-04-23 08:18:31 PM

TV's Vinnie: /seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


It's crab people isn't it.
 
2013-04-23 08:19:30 PM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


Yes I do.  Sand and rocks and clay and our new lizard people overlords
 
2013-04-23 08:20:17 PM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


Mostly stone, gravel,and dirt. Some iron and coal too. Maybe a cave or an abandoned mine. If you want diamonds or gold, you'll have to dig deeper, but watch out for lava!
 
2013-04-23 08:20:58 PM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


farm5.static.flickr.com
 
2013-04-23 08:24:33 PM
Just as long as it gets the dinosaurs ... like my boss.
 
2013-04-23 08:26:48 PM
What I find interesting is that November 28th 2013 is the day I was born.  Not surprising of course, dad got a double rainbow.
 
2013-04-23 08:27:33 PM

picturescrazy: TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?

Mostly stone, gravel,and dirt. Some iron and coal too. Maybe a cave or an abandoned mine. If you want diamonds or gold, you'll have to dig deeper, but watch out for lava!


Also shadow, and flame.
 
2013-04-23 08:30:55 PM

kim jong-un: What I find interesting is that November 28th 2013 is the day I was born.  Not surprising of course, dad got a double rainbow.


you were born in the future?
 
2013-04-23 08:33:08 PM

picturescrazy: A comet as bright as a full moon? That must be amazing to see. I may just use this as an excuse to finally get a telescope.


Very much this. Any space geeks have recommendations?
 
2013-04-23 08:34:49 PM
Good. I want a bright comet. Still pissed at Halley's 1986 bullshiat.
 
2013-04-23 08:36:54 PM
The Mayan calendar runs a little fast.
 
2013-04-23 08:49:33 PM

RatMaster999: Good, I still have time to start a cult before it gets here.


I'm still working out what kind of product might be best to scam the masses. I'm thinking overly priced iPhone cases or bracelets that contain molecules from actual comets that will protect users from the dangerous energy waves that will blast our planet as the sun relfects and refracts off the comet dust.

/I live in Thailand. This crazy scheme just might work. Easy money. :D
 
2013-04-23 08:49:39 PM

RatMaster999: Good, I still have time to start a cult before it gets here.


Remember,the key to a good comet cult is picking out some nice kicks.
 
2013-04-23 08:50:34 PM
I have a chance to buy a Celestron SP C102 telescope for $375 CDN, does this seem like a good buy? ·
 
2013-04-23 08:54:13 PM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


Solid rock. Maybe some lava tubes.

/haleakala
 
2013-04-23 09:08:21 PM
www.gannett-cdn.com

ISON what you did there.
 
2013-04-23 09:09:14 PM
www.skyandtelescope.com/
 
2013-04-23 09:30:30 PM
 A good pair of binoculars would probably be a better choice than a telescope.   Decent scopes start out at around $500.00, and you're not getting much aperture for that, 4" or 5".     The binos would give a great view of an object such as a comet.  

I don't even do any visual anymore, all astrophotography - and you don't want to go down that road unless you're willing to spend a metric assload of money.    I spent that metric assload, and there is always something else you need to make things work just a little better.    An autoguider.   Guide scope.  Better quality mount.  Better camera.  Faster computer, to deal with the software involved.
 
2013-04-23 09:33:22 PM

kim jong-un: What I find interesting is that November 28th 2013 is the day I was born.  Not surprising of course, dad got a double rainbow.


Your Dad got a double rainbow, eh?  Man, you grew up fast.  I'd've expected you to still be in diapers yet...  I mean it wasn't that long ago that your Pop posted this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=js6sySAGNS0
 
2013-04-23 09:35:09 PM

Durboloid: A good pair of binoculars would probably be a better choice than a telescope.   Decent scopes start out at around $500.00, and you're not getting much aperture for that, 4" or 5".     The binos would give a great view of an object such as a comet.  

I don't even do any visual anymore, all astrophotography - and you don't want to go down that road unless you're willing to spend a metric assload of money.    I spent that metric assload, and there is always something else you need to make things work just a little better.    An autoguider.   Guide scope.  Better quality mount.  Better camera.  Faster computer, to deal with the software involved.


What are you talking about?  That's not expensive at all.  Why, a nice German Equatorial only runs about 10-20 grand last time I checked.  Chump change!

\poor
 
2013-04-23 10:00:38 PM
Good.
 
2013-04-23 10:12:30 PM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


My doomsday bunker, of course
 
2013-04-23 10:18:26 PM
Imagine if Sarah Palin had a hotflash vision that this comet was really the freedom comet, and her teatarded followers take her hallucination as gospel and drink poisonous Reaganade.     Tens of thousands of power scooters with American flags draped over dead fatties in scooters found all over rural America.
 
2013-04-23 10:18:43 PM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


Ancient Ones. The comet is Ghroth.
 
2013-04-23 10:22:38 PM
images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-04-23 10:44:31 PM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


A lot of us are waiting for the punchline.
Please offer it.
 
2013-04-23 10:44:59 PM

RatMaster999: Good, I still have time to start a cult before it gets here.


2.bp.blogspot.com
Ill be waiting!
 
2013-04-23 10:52:20 PM

mamoru: RatMaster999: Good, I still have time to start a cult before it gets here.

I'm still working out what kind of product might be best to scam the masses. I'm thinking overly priced iPhone cases or bracelets that contain molecules from actual comets that will protect users from the dangerous energy waves that will blast our planet as the sun relfects and refracts off the comet dust.

/I live in Thailand. This crazy scheme just might work. Easy money. :D


12 stage water filter that "adds oxy-meteoric protection" to your tap water. Includes free iPhone case. It would sell like crazy. Grandpa Somchai must have his oxy-meteoric protection.

/Chiang Mai.
 
2013-04-23 11:32:41 PM
crotchgrabber:

picturescrazy: A comet as bright as a full moon? That must be amazing to see. I may just use this as an excuse to finally get a telescope.

Very much this. Any space geeks have recommendations?


Seconded on the "good pair of binoculars" recommendation. You're not likely to bring out much more detail with a consumer-grade scope.

You'll laugh, but this is the best bright-comet-watching equipment:

i33.tinypic.com

In the 90's we had two spectacular comets, Hyatuke and Hale-Bopp. My quondam G/F and I probably provided the neighbors with much amusement when we went out on the porch just after sunset every night with some cold drinks and stared westward with toilet-paper tubes held to our eyes. The tube blocks out ambient light so you can see the comet properly.
 
2013-04-23 11:41:29 PM

wabu: I have a chance to buy a Celestron SP C102 telescope for $375 CDN, does this seem like a good buy? ·


If it's in good condition, buy it. Orion is selling a similar scope with a cheaper mount (no motor drive) for $459 US.
 
2013-04-23 11:58:38 PM
Unfortunately, ISON's brightness seems to have leveled off. It's too early to know for certain, but this is not a good sign.

aerith.net
 
2013-04-24 12:28:50 AM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


Let's see - dirt, buried utility lines, sewer/storm drains, rock, bitumen-laden sand, and then more rock.  You have to go alot deeper than that here to get to the Graboids.
 
2013-04-24 12:29:33 AM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


Graboids.
 
2013-04-24 12:31:35 AM
Damnit.
 
2013-04-24 12:32:25 AM

Benevolent Misanthrope: You have to go alot deeper than that here to get to the Graboids.


Not if you make a lot of noise.
 
2013-04-24 12:36:45 AM

ArcadianRefugee: Benevolent Misanthrope: You have to go alot deeper than that here to get to the Graboids.

Not if you make a lot of noise.


No, here they stay deep for the heat.  It's farking COLD in Northern Alberta.  You have to go out to the Athabascan oil sands to find drill sites deep enough to really disturb them, and even then they're scared shiatless of your average Fort Mac Miner.
 
2013-04-24 01:14:14 AM
24.media.tumblr.com
 
2013-04-24 03:15:39 AM

italie:


kind looks like shes into it
 
2013-04-24 04:02:38 AM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


Ancient cedar logs from the forests that have been covered by multiple lahars from Mt Reinier is what lies 100 feet below me.
 
2013-04-24 05:50:37 AM
I don't know about you, but I have charcoal grey Ordovician limestone less than 100 feet under me. Also, the storage lockers. I have a pretty good idea what is in mine, but the other lockers are a mystery as I don't much care what is in them.

This site was a deep, low-oxygen bay in the Ordovician period roughly 450 million years ago. Most of the subsequent rock has eroded away. The hill (formerly Barracks Hill, now Parliament Hill) is a large slab of rock that slopes gently up from South Ottawa to the cliffs over the Ottawa River. I have a sample of the rock with lovely rose quartz inclusions.

We're relatively safe here from floods and also from earthquakes* which could liquefy the soil in many of the low-lying suburbs of Ottawa. That leaves extreme weather events, terrorsm, fire, nukes, comets, etc.

*But I could be buried under my books.
 
2013-04-24 06:08:51 AM
I'll believe that the comet will be brighter than the Moon when I see it, which I doubt I will. The last bally-hooed comet was barely visible from a large dark area surrounding a suburban bus stop. You will probably need clear dark skies to see this one also. Or a telescope. Maybe a good pair of binoculars.

Comets are over-hyped by the press. To be as bright as the Moon (42% of the Sun's light at full Moon under exceptional circumstances) a comet would have to be right on top of us, like in the episode of the Simpsons, "Bart's Comet". As one of the nerds observes, you shouldn't be able to see a comet by daylight.

The Moon covers about half a degree of sky, which is tiny (you can block it out with your thumb) but the brightest stars and planets cover a few seconds of arc. Comets tend to be very vague smudges on the dark sky, as hard to spot as the Great Galaxy in Andromeda which spreads across five or six degrees.

The Great Comet (Halley's) was an exception to the rule in 1912, but my eldest grand-parent was an infant at the time and it was the year that Mark Twain died (he was born in the previous Year of the Comet). He came in with the Comet and he always said that he would go out with it. They nicknamed him "the Rider on the Comet" or perhaps he nicknamed himself.

The old game of "Alley, Alley, Over" was based on Halley's Comet. You throw a ball over a small isolated building such as a garage or shed (shouting "Alley, Alley, Over!" as you do, and the opposing side catches it and tries to tag you. You chase each other around the small building until you are tired of the game and everybody declares themselves the winners. The building adds an element of surprise to the game of tag.

Halley's name is pronounced to rhyme with alley. The "h" was dropped by the children who invented the game in the 1700s or 1800s, as many British speakers are wont to do. Halley was one of the many great amateur astronomers that the UK produced in th 1700s. A lot of gentlemen, ladies, well-to-do middle class farmers, etc., enjoyed amateur science because they had plenty of educaton, time and money.

You may not be able to see a comet by daylight as a rule, but you can sometimes see a bright star or planet if you know where to look and shade your eyes from the Sun. Most of the "stars" you see when looking at clear blue sky are phosphenes, an optical effect caused by pressure in your eyes, or if you are an astronaut, by cosmic rays passing through your eyes. Yes, your eyes are cosmic particle detectors! In spaaaaaaaaaace!
 
2013-04-24 07:35:44 AM

brantgoose: (42% of the Sun's light at full Moon under exceptional circumstances)


Wow, this is NOT correct. At all. Holy shiat, that's amazing that you believe this. The Sun has an apparent magnitude of something like -27. The full moon has an apparent magnitude of about -13. To turn magnitude into brightness, you use the formula 2.512delta-m, so in this case, we get 2.51214, or 400,000 times as bright. That means the moon has 0.000000025% of the sun's light at full moon, not 42%

brantgoose: as hard to spot as the Great Galaxy in Andromeda which spreads across five or six degrees.


No no no, this is wrong too. It's more like 3 or 4 degrees. Not 5 or 6.

Seriously, stop posting unless you know what you're talking about.
 
2013-04-24 10:23:59 AM

TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


D'uh.  It's turtles.  All the way down.
 
2013-04-24 12:16:47 PM

rockymountainrider: TV's Vinnie: HotIgneous Intruder: This crap again?

This crap always.

It keeps the meat watching the skies when the real threat is coming up from underground.


/seriously. Do you know for sure what is laying less than 100 feet beneath the surface of where you're sitting right now?


...Crab people? I bet it's crab people.

/Look like crabs.
//Taste like people
 
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