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(The New York Times)   Boston Bombing suspect has been mirandized. (Link goes to bedside transcript)   (nytimes.com) divider line 14
    More: Followup  
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4692 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Apr 2013 at 9:15 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-23 09:17:00 AM  
3 votes:
Good.  American citizen on American soil.
2013-04-23 11:00:06 AM  
1 votes:
They should have read him his rights immediately. They did so for McVeigh. They did so for the Unabomber. Let's not forget that as despicable as this person is, he is an American citizen in American soil, and is thus afforded the full rights enjoyed by citizens. My understanding is that Miranda rights are fundamental and exist whether or not they are stated by police; since it is his fundamental right, anything he said prior to being read those rights can't be entered as evidence against him. I can see why the government would not read his rights immediately: they think they have a slam-dunk case with a preponderance of evidence and don't need a statement from the defendant to secure a conviction. I find two things troubling, however. First, in the interim between his apprehension and his being read his rights, was he induced to make statements without lawyers present and in unorthodox ways? Second, what is the rubric for the decision to not read Miranda rights to a U.S. citizen in U.S. soil? Is it because he was born abroad? These are dangerous precedents that I believe to be unconstitutional.

/not a lawyer, obviously.
2013-04-23 09:59:42 AM  
1 votes:
It beyond sad that there was even the discussion it wouldn't happen.
2013-04-23 09:45:08 AM  
1 votes:

vygramul: Marcus Aurelius: vygramul: Government is under no obligation to Mirandize people. That's something people don't seem to comprehend.

And the judge and jury are under no obligation to convict someone suffering such a ridiculous miscarriage of justice.

Actually, they are, if the evidence is properly collected.


The jury can do whatever the hell it wants once it's behind closed doors.  It's called "jury nullification".
2013-04-23 09:42:08 AM  
1 votes:

TheDumbBlonde: Cythraul: TheDumbBlonde: The bastard is a citizen, he has rights. Non-citizens, not so much.

So if a foreigner visits the U.S. and is accused of a crime, they don't have all the same rights of due process as an American citizen does?

In a word? No.


Equal rights under the law means rule of law for everyone.  The moment you start making exceptions, trouble starts.

I'm sure you're familiar with the saying, "One man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter".

Besides, this guy is just a dickhead.  If we deny the rule of law to dickheads, half the country would lose their rights.
2013-04-23 09:37:58 AM  
1 votes:

vygramul: Government is under no obligation to Mirandize people. That's something people don't seem to comprehend.


And the judge and jury are under no obligation to convict someone suffering such a ridiculous miscarriage of justice.
d23 [TotalFark]
2013-04-23 09:36:26 AM  
1 votes:

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: Anybody in West, TX been charged yet?


The CEO hopped his corporate jet, you can bet on it.

That saga is a great testament to what is so farked up in the US and in Texas specifically.  When hundreds of people get flooded out of their homes then spending on them is wasteful.  When a corporation causes their own demise and takes half a town with it then it deserves government help.
2013-04-23 09:36:03 AM  
1 votes:

TheDumbBlonde: The bastard is a citizen, he has rights. Non-citizens, not so much.


Basic rights in the legal system has absolutely nothing to do with citizenship.
2013-04-23 09:30:59 AM  
1 votes:

Cythraul: TheDumbBlonde: The bastard is a citizen, he has rights. Non-citizens, not so much.

So if a foreigner visits the U.S. and is accused of a crime, they don't have all the same rights of due process as an American citizen does?


In a word? No.
2013-04-23 09:30:14 AM  
1 votes:
Anybody in West, TX been charged yet?
2013-04-23 09:29:58 AM  
1 votes:
Good.
Now charge him with treason.
And after he's convicted, strip him of his citizenship.
2013-04-23 09:23:42 AM  
1 votes:

karnal: Mirandized?  Is that when they slowly and painfully peel the skin off your body to get a confession??


No, it's where you dose them with G-32 Paxilon Hydroclorate and hope to god they don't turn into a reaver
2013-04-23 09:18:35 AM  
1 votes:
Now let's look at all the tremendous negative consequences this act has had:
2013-04-23 09:18:00 AM  
1 votes:
Good. That's one argument we won't have to listen to anymore.
 
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