If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   NYT explains why NYC isn't really that expensive after all. Subby nods approvingly while eating $50 take out for one in a $2,200/month studio apartment. Reasonable debate comparing regional costs of living not found to the right   (nytimes.com) divider line 51
    More: Interesting, NYT, New York, per capita incomes, Metropolitan Opera, Wharton School, USDA Organic, young professional, eating  
•       •       •

6745 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Apr 2013 at 10:11 AM (52 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Archived thread
2013-04-23 08:42:00 AM
5 votes:
A pair of sensible, unstylish walking flats from Harry's Shoes can set you back $480.

It's called Zappos,com, look into it.
2013-04-23 10:29:35 AM
3 votes:

Ethertap: I live in south Georgia, I pay 500 bucks a month for a 1000 square-foot apartment.  In return for my tiny rent, I get to live in a town with no bar, no nightlife, no restaurant variety, and no culture.

When I got my job offer here I thought the pay was pretty lousy, 10% under national average for new hires in my field.  Then I looked up cost of living in the area and realized why it was that low.

The way I look at living in a place like New York, Chicago, Boston, or San Francisco (among others) is that despite the high cost of living, at least theres things to do, places to go, and interesting things to eat.


If you can't get laid in a town with nothing to do, you're doing it wrong.
2013-04-23 01:56:37 PM
2 votes:

YouPeopleAreCrazy: Bill Frist: Yeah... New Yorkers are not subsidized. We pay far more in taxes, and actually subsidize the shiatty rural parts.

The shiatty rural parts that actually feed you. And build your furniture. And all the other shinies that you desire.


The delusional nature of rural america is kind of staggaring. You really think that the big cities have huge economies caue they don't produce things people want to buy? 

Anyway, California produces, by far, the most food of any state. Podunk north dakota, or wharever, isn't really feeding america.
2013-04-23 12:13:52 PM
2 votes:
Rik01:NYC sounds like a fascinating place, with all sorts of cool things to buy and my folks raved about the assorted foods, but I don't think I'd do well there. Plus I've seen the tiny apartments that cost more to rent than a huge house down here and wonder why folks want to live that way

In NYC, home is where you go to sleep, and where you store your stuff.  You don't spend as much time at home as you do in rural areas, which is why having a lot of space isn't that important.  What is important for us big-city people is location.  To be near everything.  Art spaces, galleries, museums, restaurants, cheap food, bars, work, and so on.  And many of these places are open 24/7, so if you feel like having a pizza and chat with some people at 3am, you can just walk out the door and do just that.

When I lived in the suburbs I hated the finality of getting home.  You went home, and that was it for the day.  Maybe watch a little TV, go online for a bit, then bedtime.  In the city I have that option, or I can just walk right out and go do something.  Or not even go home at all until whatever time I chose.

I agree, it isn't for everyone.  But it does have its appeal for others, myself included.  And it it has nothing to do with cool things to buy.
2013-04-23 11:58:33 AM
2 votes:
Didn't we just have this thread just yesterday?
2013-04-23 11:37:32 AM
2 votes:
New York is the cheapest city I've ever lived in OTHER than the rent. The rent is crazy, but the abundance of free entertainment, cheap food, and great public transportation do cut down the costs a ton.
2013-04-23 11:12:22 AM
2 votes:
farm1.staticflickr.com
2013-04-23 10:54:38 AM
2 votes:

Rev.K: James!: There's three kinds of pork in that motherfarker. DID YOU OBSERVE THOSE WORDS?

THREE KINDS OF PORK!

That's fantastic, but that cilantro has to go.

Devil weed.


Try coriander instead.
2013-04-23 10:27:56 AM
2 votes:
This thread again.

NYC - not for everybody.  Living here doesn't make you special.  Living somewhere else doesn't make you special.
2013-04-23 10:18:55 AM
2 votes:

James!: sigdiamond2000: Rev.K: that cilantro has to go.

Looks like it's got some other elitist roughage in there as well.

Enjoy your fancy sandwich, Mr. Moderator.

I will.


quite frankly, the vietnamese have mastered the sandwich.  with a vibrant cuilinary background, molested by the french at just the right age, you have yourself the perfect, most balanced sandwich on earth... and it's on good bread too.

fatty pork, excellent pickles, and... good bread and cilantro.  not sure where this sandwich could be wanting.
2013-04-23 09:50:00 AM
2 votes:

sigdiamond2000: James!: I spent 23 dollars on Vietnamese food the other day, had it delivered to my apartment after 11 at night and had enough for lunch the next day.

Uhhhh...ummmm...HISPTER!!11


Look at this motherfarker:
tomjinadventures.files.wordpress.com

There's three kinds of pork in that motherfarker.  DID YOU OBSERVE THOSE WORDS?

THREE KINDS OF PORK!
2013-04-23 08:46:39 AM
2 votes:
$50 take-out for one is a huge exaggeration. A $2,200 studio apartment isn't.
2013-04-23 04:02:58 PM
1 votes:

SirEattonHogg: Big_fat_liar
An odd thing about people from LA who move out of state is you never forget where they are from, because they mention it on pretty much a daily basis.  Makes you wonder why they moved....

Well, that's true of all big city folks when they move out of their jurisdiction.  Certainly we have lots of New Yorkers here who can't stop complaining about LA and the fact they have to drive to get from A to B and our mass transit ain't so good.  Yeah, we get it.  NYC is a walking town.  Thanks for telling us what we already know.


What is it with girls and LA?  My sister in law is dying to go back out to visit, even though she will be travelling broke.  She says it is so much fun out there.  She's in Atlanta now - maybe that has something to do with it...

I lived out their (San Jose anyway) for a short time as a kid and have visited as an adult....just don't see it.  A city is a city is a city.  I'm not a big Dead fan but "Your typical city involved in a typical daydream ...."
2013-04-23 03:07:48 PM
1 votes:

SirEattonHogg: Sorry, NYC and Chicago, your weather and people suck.  And New York City restaurants are way overrated and expensive.

LA and SF has better food, weather and attitude.  This is all based on the scientific method of "my farking opinion."


An odd thing about people from LA who move out of state is you never forget where they are from, because they mention it on pretty much a daily basis.  Makes you wonder why they moved....
2013-04-23 03:06:59 PM
1 votes:

dittybopper: Bill Frist: In a major city, cars are limiting, not freeing.

Only if you rarely leave the immediate metro area.  If the horizon of your World doesn't exceed 10 or 15 miles from Central Park, then yeah, a car is probably more trouble than it's worth.


This has been hammered to death in this thread, but it's really more like "hundreds of miles from Central Park". The LIRR, etc., connect readily to the entire metro area (the hundred or so miles up Long Island, for example, and the rest of the region on other services), and beyond that, Boston, Washington, Philadelphia, and most of those regions are all readily linked up, as well. You have more or less complete freedom of movement within the northeast, and the gaps are mostly places people don't really have all that much reason to go for either business or pleasure. It's rare enough of a problem that taking a cab to connect up the remaining leg in those situations would still be far cheaper and less of a hassle than car ownership. Anything beyond that, most people, regardless of whether they own a car, would fly anyway.

This is really a ridiculous and somewhat desperate, pointless argument. There's no serious debate over the convenience and cost. The idea that car ownership is a big deal is really about image, as people in some parts of this country associate it with independence. They want to *see themselves* as free to go wherever they want, whenever they want, even though they rarely do. People in other parts just don't see it that way, and still go where they want to go.

The whole "oh, your world must just have small horizons" retort is just ludicrous. Beyond their own regions, it's my observation that people in NY do tend to travel quite a bit more widely and more often than people I deal with smaller towns, I'm assuming because of the higher incomes and far better access to cheaper, faster transportation than some dude relying on EAS flights to a second tier hub.
2013-04-23 02:23:35 PM
1 votes:

YouPeopleAreCrazy: The shiatty rural parts that actually feed you. And build your furniture. And all the other shinies that you desire.


That's a bizarre claim, considering that manufacturing is largely tied to urban areas (small cities and up, you can't much of a factory without infrastructure and a workforce), and the only thing keeping much of America's rural agriculture afloat is massive government subsidy paid for by those in higher tax brackets.

I mean, really. I have nothing against small towns or rural America in general, I'm from there, but let's not be ridiculous. America has been urbanizing for decades and rural counties, by and large, are dying, both literally (health outcomes) and figuratively (population loss). The infrastructure that makes it recognizably First World in modern rural America isn't paid for by the infinitesimal tax revenue on some dude's $100,000 house and $35,000 wages, it's paid for by what goes on in the cities.
2013-04-23 02:04:52 PM
1 votes:

FarkFarkFarkGOOSE: NYC is like the hipster "culture" infecting it for the past decade. It is rich, lazy and obvious. The same bland almart and piggly wiggly mentality under the nom de plum of cheap jacks and trader joes. Now that even therougher edges like Harlem, DUMBO, wberg, etc have been smoothed out by spoiled trusties, it lost the truth that real writers, artists and musicians lent it in prior decades. I'm sorry but blogging about your 15 dollar three pork and cilantro sandwich is no less banal than a nascar fan praising fried twinkies. Coast to coast, the same vapid stupidity found in flyover towns is found in D. Trump'ed first tier "work-shop-play" cities, just in a different flavor. The uniqueness of a singular Warhol has been supplanted by a proliferation ofnumerous assholes who permeate the city like an oil slick, covering the mundane with the absurd. Screw mickey mouse, skinny jeans and non functional horn rimmed glasses. Give me back the hookers, CBGBs and The Roxy. Buying organics and growing a few tomatos while you sop up bukowski and the lumineers doesntmake you edgy or relevant. From this nyc native- Fark you hipster from Harrisburg, you came, you saw, you ruined.


You forget that New Yorkers still live in actual New York. It's called Queens, the Bronx, and Eastern Brooklyn and... sigh... Staten Island. That being said I find only new comers to "glamorize" NYC in the 1980's and 70s. While I do find it disconcerting not to have the "toughness" the city used to have (Wisconsin socialite wannabes in the LES? WTF?), I will also be the first to admit that the quality of life in NYC is drastically better than it was 25+ years ago.
2013-04-23 01:47:01 PM
1 votes:
NYC is like the hipster "culture" infecting it for the past decade. It is rich, lazy and obvious. The same bland almart and piggly wiggly mentality under the nom de plum of cheap jacks and trader joes. Now that even therougher edges like Harlem, DUMBO, wberg, etc have been smoothed out by spoiled trusties, it lost the truth that real writers, artists and musicians lent it in prior decades. I'm sorry but blogging about your 15 dollar three pork and cilantro sandwich is no less banal than a nascar fan praising fried twinkies. Coast to coast, the same vapid stupidity found in flyover towns is found in D. Trump'ed first tier "work-shop-play" cities, just in a different flavor. The uniqueness of a singular Warhol has been supplanted by a proliferation ofnumerous assholes who permeate the city like an oil slick, covering the mundane with the absurd. Screw mickey mouse, skinny jeans and non functional horn rimmed glasses. Give me back the hookers, CBGBs and The Roxy. Buying organics and growing a few tomatos while you sop up bukowski and the lumineers doesntmake you edgy or relevant. From this nyc native- Fark you hipster from Harrisburg, you came, you saw, you ruined.
2013-04-23 01:10:56 PM
1 votes:
Wow, hearty lol at someone from Chicago trying to feel superior to NYC.

Chicago is a pretty shiatty city. I get wanting to live in rural America (I was raised there myself), cool small towns, or even cool non-NYC big cities.

But Chicago is ultimate "I couldn't make it anywhere else" bummer city.
2013-04-23 01:02:06 PM
1 votes:

CtrlAltDestroy: Bill Frist: Man, your logic is really poor. Living in a city w/o a car doesn't "severally limit" your life experience.

As long as you intend to remain within the city limits, no.

First off, major cities offer far more life experiences than the suburbs.

This is opinion. Not fact.


Every last goddamn bit of this thread is Opinion, you Dolt
2013-04-23 12:59:24 PM
1 votes:

CtrlAltDestroy: NYC is 468 sq mi. To make it a square is about 21.6 x 21.6 miles. 20 miles is my drive to work. It's not that odd that someone would travel 20-50+ miles for something. And in a straight line without other stops (ala bus or train). My friend's daughter recently drove 3 hours to the state capitol just for fun. I know people who make frequent weekend trips out of town and/or out of state.


Dude...

A) Transportation in NYC goes further than its city borders.

B) Dunno why this has to keep being stressed to you, but Amtrak, buses, zipcar and plenty of other options are available to travel even farther than that. Plenty of NYers make frequent weekend trips without owning a car.

C) the average person on an average day does not travel very far in there car. That really shouldn't be a controversial statement.
2013-04-23 12:06:35 PM
1 votes:

pute kisses like a man: Hipchewy1: sigdiamond2000: James!: I spent 23 dollars on Vietnamese food the other day, had it delivered to my apartment after 11 at night and had enough for lunch the next day.

Uhhhh...ummmm...HISPTER!!11

Recently I ordered a gluten free pulled pork, red onion, horseradish-yogurt  waffle, had it delivered. With a side of Kale chips. $25 with tip. It felt a little hipstery

not sure if you know this or not, but, as far as i understand, all pork is gluten free.  gluten is like some wheat thing.  you would have to add gluten to pork, which doesn't seem sensible. i've noticed products have lately presented themselves as gluten free.  but, those products have no relation to wheat whatsoever.  so, i just want to warn you, often "gluten-free" is as valuable as salt advertising that it's sugar free.


I'm well aware, I have Celiac disease. The waffle was gluten free.
2013-04-23 12:05:22 PM
1 votes:

CtrlAltDestroy: But if one is the kind of person who never feels the need to leave a major city, then I guess that doesn't matter. They're severally limiting their experience in life by doing so, but that's their choice. Those people also aren't allowed to talk about non city living as they lack the experience required to actually understand it.


Man, your logic is really poor. Living in a city w/o a car doesn't "severally limit" your life experience. First off, major cities offer far more life experiences than the suburbs. But even without that, you do realize that.... planes and trains and buses and many other types of transportation exists, not just cars?

I come from a small city and my family all have cars. They rarely travel further than I do on a daily basis in NYC. And they travel to OTHER cities and other parts of the world much less than me.

Some people have cars and drive all over the country and continent. But most don't gain "life experience" with their car. They just shuttle between home, work and McDonalds.
2013-04-23 11:56:28 AM
1 votes:

DarkVader: Look, it's all about what YOU value in life.

If you want to be able to walk down the block and go to a bar, a restaurant, a nightclub, a museum, a park, a theatre, or whatever else you can think of, you want to live in a big city.  If you're interested in staying home, cooking for yourself, watching your home theater, owning a car, and having a big backyard, you probably want a suburb of a smaller city.  If you want to grow your own food, shoot your guns for target practice, hunt on your own land, ride 4-wheelers, or that sort of thing, you want to live in a rural area.

Different people value different things, you all know this, and you're arguing about it anyway.

As for me, I like having a 2k square foot house near downtown in a medium size city.  I'm easy walking distance to 4 bars (including a gay bar), 3 restaurants, a natural foods grocery store, three mechanics, two bus lines, a non-chain coffee shop, and several parks.  A longer walk or 5-10 minute drive will get me to another 30 or so bars, about the same number of restaurants (most of them not chains), 20 fast food places, a major university, a few theatres, and quite a few other things to do.  Oh, and the house was under $100k, and I don't have a HOA to deal with.


Yep, these debates are normally stupid because people are just arguing about different things. I couldn't care less about having " fruit trees" in my backyard. (Note: I grew up on tons of land in a semi-rural area, so I know what I'm missing). But it isn't going to impress someone who cares about that and not, say, theater to know about all the options in NYC.

To each his own.

The other thing that has to be factored in here is one's career. If you are doing anything in the arts (books, music, theater, comedy, TV, etc.) the benefits to living in NYC over any other city* is pretty staggering. No amount of back yard space makes up for the connections, events, and career benifits of a city like NYC for many careers.

*A few semi-exceptions like Chicago for theater and comedy, or LA for comedy and film
2013-04-23 11:51:28 AM
1 votes:
Look, it's all about what YOU value in life.

If you want to be able to walk down the block and go to a bar, a restaurant, a nightclub, a museum, a park, a theatre, or whatever else you can think of, you want to live in a big city.  If you're interested in staying home, cooking for yourself, watching your home theater, owning a car, and having a big backyard, you probably want a suburb of a smaller city.  If you want to grow your own food, shoot your guns for target practice, hunt on your own land, ride 4-wheelers, or that sort of thing, you want to live in a rural area.

Different people value different things, you all know this, and you're arguing about it anyway.

As for me, I like having a 2k square foot house near downtown in a medium size city.  I'm easy walking distance to 4 bars (including a gay bar), 3 restaurants, a natural foods grocery store, three mechanics, two bus lines, a non-chain coffee shop, and several parks.  A longer walk or 5-10 minute drive will get me to another 30 or so bars, about the same number of restaurants (most of them not chains), 20 fast food places, a major university, a few theatres, and quite a few other things to do.  Oh, and the house was under $100k, and I don't have a HOA to deal with.
2013-04-23 11:31:39 AM
1 votes:

Ethertap: The way I look at living in a place like New York, Chicago, Boston, or San Francisco (among others) is that despite the high cost of living, at least theres things to do, places to go, and interesting things to eat.


I've been around long enough to know that there is a myth about how much better cities are for these things than being outside. London people are dreadful for thinking that the civilised world ends at Chiswick.

I live 80 miles west of London and I go and regularly see theatre, ballet, opera, live concerts and bands in Oxford, Bath or Bristol. I've got 2 restaurants within 20 miles that have 2 Michelin stars, pubs that get fish landed freshly from Cornwall each day, and one of the most highly renowned Japanese restaurants in the UK not far from me. Even shopping is no big deal now. I used to travel for coffee, books, music and wine, but I get it delivered now.
2013-04-23 11:29:37 AM
1 votes:

Lollipop165: PC LOAD LETTER: Pocket Ninja: Hm. Where is this $2,200/month studio apartment?

Mine cost $1,440 when I was living in Hell's Kitchen in 2000. $2,200 doesn't sound that unfeasible, though it does sound high.

In 2008, my rent was approx $2300 in the UES and I had a studio duplex. Although admittedly the bottom floor of the studio was in the basement (no windows) it did give me some extra square footage most other studios don't have. I work in Manhattan's rental market - in the  UWS you can find a studio reasonably for $2200 - although it will be small and in a walk up building and no amenities.  I pay only a bit above that in mortgage and maintenance for a large 2 bed/2ba in Queens now. If you are willing to go a bit higher into Harlem or East Harlem you can find a very nice 1 bedroom in that budget though. It won't be lux, but you'll have significantly more space.

I rent 200sf studios on Clinton street in a walk up building for approx $2k/mo. They are renovated, but the LES is getting insane with prices.

Regarding the article though, I remember in one of my anthro classes studying "garbology" (literally, people's garbage) and it was found that low income people were far more likely to buy brand name (and higher cost) food items, like Doritos or Cheerios than were their wealthier counterparts, who were far more likely to buy non-brand items, like "Key Food brand cheese chips" (aka doritos). The theory is that lower income people use name brand store items as a class marker, as spending an extra 50 cents is pretty much what defines the poor from the really poor, whereas wealthier people don't make the distinction and therefore have no preference as to which food brand they purchase.


So that is an observation without performing interviews?  That seems like studying elephant dung.  They're humans, ask questions!  I suspect the answer you'd get from them is "I dunno".  And "I dunno" = mesmerized to buy whatever the glowing box tells them to.
2013-04-23 11:27:57 AM
1 votes:
College towns are the way to go.  I live downtown in a three bedroom home with a $750/month mortgage, walk to work, get to see ACC basketball, football, and baseball, usually for free or dirt cheap.  Also get up-and-coming bands in town to play to all the college kids.  And a constantly churning supply of 18-26 year old women really tips the dating dynamic in the men's favor.  Best of both worlds.
2013-04-23 11:27:43 AM
1 votes:

RatOmeter: you have pee hands: You do save by not having to have a car.

Not enough to cover a $2200 studio apartment, but it helps some.

I just did some rough calculations on my cost of having a car for the last 18 years:

Price paid: $16000
Miles driven: 179,000
Fuel economy: ~24 MPG
Fuel used: 179,000/24 = 7500 gallons (rounded up)
Fuel cost: $3/gallon (another estimate, price has changed a lot in 18 years) * 7500 = $22,500
Insurance paid: $4000 (estimate average of ~$200/per year, rounded up, paid $130 last year)
Oil changes: ~$30/year * 18 = $540
Tires: estimate 1 set every 2 years at $400/set (high estimate) * 9 = $3600
Maint & repairs: $2000 (high estimate, actually did all my own mechanic work)

Total: $48640
Annual cost: $2700
Weekly cost: $52
Daily cost: ~$7.40

Probably riddled with errors, but there it is, for whatever it's worth.


Not having to use urine scented public transportation:  PRICELESS!
2013-04-23 11:15:41 AM
1 votes:
Not going to read the thread for a bit, but I assume there is already some variation of "sure, it's cheaper to live elsewhere, if you call that living." NYC is home to a lot of paradoxically provincial people.
2013-04-23 11:14:31 AM
1 votes:
I'm happy where I'm at. You're happy where you're at. It's all good.
2013-04-23 11:08:55 AM
1 votes:

PC LOAD LETTER: Pocket Ninja: Hm. Where is this $2,200/month studio apartment?

Mine cost $1,440 when I was living in Hell's Kitchen in 2000. $2,200 doesn't sound that unfeasible, though it does sound high.


In 2008, my rent was approx $2300 in the UES and I had a studio duplex. Although admittedly the bottom floor of the studio was in the basement (no windows) it did give me some extra square footage most other studios don't have. I work in Manhattan's rental market - in the  UWS you can find a studio reasonably for $2200 - although it will be small and in a walk up building and no amenities.  I pay only a bit above that in mortgage and maintenance for a large 2 bed/2ba in Queens now. If you are willing to go a bit higher into Harlem or East Harlem you can find a very nice 1 bedroom in that budget though. It won't be lux, but you'll have significantly more space.

I rent 200sf studios on Clinton street in a walk up building for approx $2k/mo. They are renovated, but the LES is getting insane with prices.

Regarding the article though, I remember in one of my anthro classes studying "garbology" (literally, people's garbage) and it was found that low income people were far more likely to buy brand name (and higher cost) food items, like Doritos or Cheerios than were their wealthier counterparts, who were far more likely to buy non-brand items, like "Key Food brand cheese chips" (aka doritos). The theory is that lower income people use name brand store items as a class marker, as spending an extra 50 cents is pretty much what defines the poor from the really poor, whereas wealthier people don't make the distinction and therefore have no preference as to which food brand they purchase.
2013-04-23 10:57:14 AM
1 votes:

travoltron: Came from the woods of NY (town of mouth breathers, nearest Taco Bell is in Canada), pay 1600/mo for a three bedroom with a backyard (not much of one, but I can grill) AND a parking space. City life can be done right if you don't have to live in Brooklyn with the fixed gear crowd.


Hate to say it, but rural upstate New York is some of the worst rural in the industrialized world. It's pretty out there and there are also lots of normal, happy, pleasant people, but holy shiat, you'll also meet some of the most isolated, pig-ignorant, toothless motherfarkers you can find in this country, and they're extremely bitter about it, resenting Syracuse and the other "big cities" *cough* and complaining about the evil influences of SUNY bringing in outsiders. I grew up in the rural midwest, but we still had the internet and flew on airplanes, for fark's sake.

Longtime Lurker: Chicago FTW. Virtually everything NYC has at half the cost.
 
/1200 for a brand new gut rehab 1br, and I'm really overpaying compared to my neighbors.
//not getting into the pizza debate


Also, this.
2013-04-23 10:55:03 AM
1 votes:
You flatlanders / flyovers are just jealous losers of us big city dwellers.

You make 30% less money, but your house is only 100% larger than our apartment.

You may have your own car, but I get to spend 35 minutes commuting to work each way compared to your 7 minute drive.

And you'll never know the joy of having overpriced food delivered to your apartment.

// amidoingitright?
2013-04-23 10:46:53 AM
1 votes:

Algebrat: Living in NYC is about the only way that I can plausibly pay down my student loans.  Both my salary and my expenses are twice as high as they would be for the same job/lifestyle in Pittsburgh, and that means the difference between the two is twice as high.  It's actually quite possible to live cheaply in NYC if your intent is financial freedom rather than getting the "experience".

\ $600 for an Upper West Side appartment.
\\ ok, it's w. 144th street.
\\\ with 2 other roommates.


That's how I feel about it too. If I can live in an expensive place on 80% of a high salary that is going to leave me a lot more fun money than living off of 80% of bupkis. There's a reason Australians ($14.38 minimum wage) travel more than Alabamans.
2013-04-23 10:43:52 AM
1 votes:

Molavian: Ethertap: I live in south Georgia, I pay 500 bucks a month for a 1000 square-foot apartment.  In return for my tiny rent, I get to live in a town with no bar, no nightlife, no restaurant variety, and no culture.

When I got my job offer here I thought the pay was pretty lousy, 10% under national average for new hires in my field.  Then I looked up cost of living in the area and realized why it was that low.

The way I look at living in a place like New York, Chicago, Boston, or San Francisco (among others) is that despite the high cost of living, at least theres things to do, places to go, and interesting things to eat.

If you can't get laid in a town with nothing to do, you're doing it wrong.


Yes....but in towns like that, the question is...."laid...by *what*?!?"
2013-04-23 10:39:48 AM
1 votes:

James!: I really doubt that most rural farkers live on vast tracts of land like they claim.  Most people live in tract housing out in the boonies and spend most of their day commuting.


What do you consider vast tracts of land?

imageshack.us
2013-04-23 10:37:44 AM
1 votes:

sigdiamond2000: James!: I really doubt that most rural farkers live on vast tracts of land like they claim.  Most people live in tract housing out in the boonies and spend most of their day commuting.

Typical clueless big city elitist. They don't spend most of their day commuting. They're housebound unemployable deadbeats.


I'm sorry, yes.  They spend most of their day waiting for the fire department to cut a hole in the wall and remove them via fork lift so they can be deposited in their check-out cage at the Super Walmart.
2013-04-23 10:35:42 AM
1 votes:

Ethertap: I live in south Georgia, I pay 500 bucks a month for a 1000 square-foot apartment.  In return for my tiny rent, I get to live in a town with no bar, no nightlife, no restaurant variety, and no culture.

When I got my job offer here I thought the pay was pretty lousy, 10% under national average for new hires in my field.  Then I looked up cost of living in the area and realized why it was that low.

The way I look at living in a place like New York, Chicago, Boston, or San Francisco (among others) is that despite the high cost of living, at least theres things to do, places to go, and interesting things to eat.


That's a healthy way to look at it- South Georgia has it's virtues as well.  It probably is pretty stable, the people are nice, and the "family values" (the good kind, not the Republican kind) are pretty strong.

For me, the most important virtue of NYC is the people I meet.  I've met people from all over the Earth, from all backgrounds, educational level from high school drop out to Rhodes Scholars, income from welfare recipients to people that make tens of millions every year.  You're not going to get that kind of mix anywhere else.  That isn't important to many and that's fine, but it's important to me and what makes it worth the money.

I'm tired of a lot of these posts (not yours) saying "I pay $200/month for 60 acres and a 27-bedroom house hurrrrrr" because they miss the point.  NYC fits me, where other people live fits them.  I could no longer live in South Georgia than many people can live in NYC.  And that's fine.
2013-04-23 10:35:11 AM
1 votes:

James!: I really doubt that most rural farkers live on vast tracts of land like they claim.  Most people live in tract housing out in the boonies and spend most of their day commuting.


Typical clueless big city elitist. They don't spend most of their day commuting. They're housebound unemployable deadbeats.
2013-04-23 10:26:07 AM
1 votes:
I really doubt that most rural farkers live on vast tracts of land like they claim.  Most people live in tract housing out in the boonies and spend most of their day commuting.
2013-04-23 10:25:01 AM
1 votes:
I live in south Georgia, I pay 500 bucks a month for a 1000 square-foot apartment.  In return for my tiny rent, I get to live in a town with no bar, no nightlife, no restaurant variety, and no culture.

When I got my job offer here I thought the pay was pretty lousy, 10% under national average for new hires in my field.  Then I looked up cost of living in the area and realized why it was that low.

The way I look at living in a place like New York, Chicago, Boston, or San Francisco (among others) is that despite the high cost of living, at least theres things to do, places to go, and interesting things to eat.
2013-04-23 10:19:34 AM
1 votes:
HAHAHH.

Of course the article is really saying that "If you're wealthy, living in New York is Cheaper for the stuff you're going to buy anyhow" So gourmet grocery stores are cheaper in NY than NOLA or San Diego. Which makes sense - NY has SO MANY wealthy people that their providers can achieve an economy of scale, and the market is large enough to accommodate multiple competing vendors. Both of these factors drive down prices ... on 4$ gourmet cookies and 400$ shoes.

This is very different than saying "They stuff that everyone needs is plentiful and cheap", and I suspect that part of this issue is that with freight cost carrying both expensive small goods and large 'cheap' goods, the small goods can afford to pay a higher freight cost. Additionally, Providing cheap goods has less margin, so new vendors probably want to jump in at the price point where there enough traffic to provide a healthy margin. It's like new apartments : Nobody builds 500$ bedsits. They all build 2500$ luxury apartments.
2013-04-23 10:19:26 AM
1 votes:

PC LOAD LETTER: Pocket Ninja: Hm. Where is this $2,200/month studio apartment?

Mine cost $1,440 when I was living in Hell's Kitchen in 2000. $2,200 doesn't sound that unfeasible, though it does sound high.


Just to give you a bit of perspective, that's more than the mortgage + taxes on my modest home on half an acre in a decent neighborhood, *PLUS* two car payments, *PLUS* my gas/electric bill.

And if I ever feel the need for some o' that New Yawk City life, I can easily make a day trip of it (and did a few times for work).

Plus, in this ever-connected World, for the most part, there is no real reason to *LIVE* there, unless you do menial labor:  You don't have to be there to work there.
2013-04-23 10:19:14 AM
1 votes:

James!: sigdiamond2000: James!: I spent 23 dollars on Vietnamese food the other day, had it delivered to my apartment after 11 at night and had enough for lunch the next day.

Uhhhh...ummmm...HISPTER!!11

Look at this motherfarker:
[tomjinadventures.files.wordpress.com image 660x327]

There's three kinds of pork in that motherfarker.  DID YOU OBSERVE THOSE WORDS?

THREE KINDS OF PORK!


Three kinds of pork?  So pot bellied pig, warthog, and NYPD?
2013-04-23 10:18:07 AM
1 votes:
Other than apartments, you can get almost everything cheap in NYC.

If you have a rent stabilized apartment, as I did for a decade, Manhattan can be very cheap indeed.
2013-04-23 10:17:11 AM
1 votes:
I don't even own a TV!
2013-04-23 10:08:19 AM
1 votes:

sigdiamond2000: Rev.K: that cilantro has to go.

Looks like it's got some other elitist roughage in there as well.

Enjoy your fancy sandwich, Mr. Moderator.


I will.
2013-04-23 09:57:48 AM
1 votes:

James!: There's three kinds of pork in that motherfarker. DID YOU OBSERVE THOSE WORDS?

THREE KINDS OF PORK!


That's fantastic, but that cilantro has to go.

Devil weed.
2013-04-23 09:13:25 AM
1 votes:

Pocket Ninja: Hm. Where is this $2,200/month studio apartment?


Mine cost $1,440 when I was living in Hell's Kitchen in 2000. $2,200 doesn't sound that unfeasible, though it does sound high.
2013-04-23 08:16:50 AM
1 votes:
Regional 'cost of living' as some sort of basis of radjustment is mostly crap. The reason it costs of a ton of money to live in New York is that living in New York is a 'good' which is in very high demand. Living here is a form of consumption. We don't subsidize consumption, and we don't pity people for consuming.
 
Displayed 51 of 51 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report