If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The New York Times)   NYT explains why NYC isn't really that expensive after all. Subby nods approvingly while eating $50 take out for one in a $2,200/month studio apartment. Reasonable debate comparing regional costs of living not found to the right   (nytimes.com) divider line 250
    More: Interesting, NYT, New York, per capita incomes, Metropolitan Opera, Wharton School, USDA Organic, young professional, eating  
•       •       •

6756 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Apr 2013 at 10:11 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



250 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all
 
2013-04-23 11:32:03 AM  

you have pee hands: You could probably add in a couple hundred a month for the amortized costs of the cars themselves, too.  Even if they're paid off now they were paid for at some point.  Someone who likes working on cars could mostly avoid that by exclusively buying old beaters and nursing them along as long as possible but most people won't do that.


Yeah, if you have a car payment then you need to factor in the payment and increased minimum insurance. But the cost isn't purely a housing cost for everyone. Some people enjoy driving and working on cars. So the cost of a car is part of entertainment or luxury or what have you.

A vehicle also affords A LOT of freedom. There's no ties to bus/train time schedules. Or worrying about missing the last train of the night. Or having to wonder or figure out if the available transportation is will where you want it to go. I have 2 cars and 3 motorcycles. I enjoy driving/riding and working on motorized toys.

I used to know a guy who insisted on living downtown. Which seemed to make him happy, so good for him. He jumped to a new apartment every year. He didn't own a car. I asked him why. He at me confused and said that didn't need one because he could walk or take public transit. But he still bummed rides from people 4-5 times a week. Then he slipped on ice in the winter and broke his ankle. Good luck walking around everywhere in the winter with a broken ankle, friend. He was also a vegan, only listened to unknown music artists, had no tv, and loved Apple products. But he insisted that he wasn't a hipster. Oi.
 
2013-04-23 11:32:51 AM  

sigdiamond2000: elitist roughage


All the better to take a nice, big, elitist shiat.
 
2013-04-23 11:34:12 AM  
FTA "...it turns out that living in New York is actually a relative bargain for the wealthy."

Well, that's a relief.
 
2013-04-23 11:34:16 AM  

DamnYankees: Regional 'cost of living' as some sort of basis of radjustment is mostly crap. The reason it costs of a ton of money to live in New York is that living in New York is a 'good' which is in very high demand. Living here is a form of consumption. We don't subsidize consumption, and we don't pity people for consuming.


Subsidizing New Yorkers is the price we pay for keeping them in New York.
 
2013-04-23 11:36:24 AM  

dumbobruni: DamnYankees: Pocket Ninja: Hm. Where is this $2,200/month studio apartment?

I had a studio near Penn Station for about $1,500. A 2200 studio is probably in the west village.

2200 seems cheap for the West Village.

i mean, look at this studio apartment for $6000.

http://streeteasy.com/nyc/rental/1036464-condo-400-west-12th-street- we st-village-new-york


I've never understood these kinds of rents, even if you're rich why would you pay that much?, seems like it would be cheaper to buy a place outside the city and hire a helicopter to fly you to work and back.
 
2013-04-23 11:37:11 AM  

dumbobruni: Longtime Lurker: Chicago FTW. Virtually everything NYC has at half the cost.

/1200 for a brand new gut rehab 1br, and I'm really overpaying compared to my neighbors.
//not getting into the pizza debate

with similar salaries for most jobs.


Well I'm a medical resident, so that's one of the downsides. Residents have some of the lower salary/cost of living ratios in the country. Also once I get through training, it's sad that salaries rise exponentially the farther away from the city core you get. A guy who graduated from my program was pulling down 2x as much pay to work in Aurora than another graduate who stayed in the city doing the same job with more hours.
 
2013-04-23 11:37:32 AM  
New York is the cheapest city I've ever lived in OTHER than the rent. The rent is crazy, but the abundance of free entertainment, cheap food, and great public transportation do cut down the costs a ton.
 
2013-04-23 11:38:40 AM  

freewill: travoltron: Came from the woods of NY (town of mouth breathers, nearest Taco Bell is in Canada), pay 1600/mo for a three bedroom with a backyard (not much of one, but I can grill) AND a parking space. City life can be done right if you don't have to live in Brooklyn with the fixed gear crowd.

Hate to say it, but rural upstate New York is some of the worst rural in the industrialized world. It's pretty out there and there are also lots of normal, happy, pleasant people, but holy shiat, you'll also meet some of the most isolated, pig-ignorant, toothless motherfarkers you can find in this country, and they're extremely bitter about it, resenting Syracuse and the other "big cities" *cough* and complaining about the evil influences of SUNY bringing in outsiders. I grew up in the rural midwest, but we still had the internet and flew on airplanes, for fark's sake.



I live in rural upstate, and in a way you're right. The town I live in isn't really that bad, but I moved here 11 years ago from a small city and do find I miss living in the suburbs of a city rather than the middle of nowhere.

Where I live is where people from Long Island, Sag Harbor, (etc.), and New Jersey have vacation homes. Lots of them. Many of them can be real pains in the arse with the attitudes. I have vacation home  "neighbors" (a couple of acres away), from New Jersey and they're o.k., but for the most part a lot of them don't know how to behave in a small town. They can be loud, obnoxious, sometimes picking fights, and could really care less if you're trying to fish while they're zipping around on their jet skis. Because...you know...out of the whole 40 acre lake the best part to jet ski on is right where you're fishing.

Don't even get me started on "city hunters"...I put orange bandannas on the dogs and a red flag on my car. Once my friend's pool was shot.
 
2013-04-23 11:38:50 AM  

DamnYankees: Pocket Ninja: Hm. Where is this $2,200/month studio apartment?

I had a studio near Penn Station for about $1,500. A 2200 studio is probably in the west village.


In the west village it will be a teeny tiny apartment.  I've seen 500sq foot one bedrooms.  On the flip side you can find 1200sq ft 2 bedroom in upper Manhattan in gentrified neighborhoods that are about a 15 minute train ride to Midtown.
 
2013-04-23 11:39:17 AM  

skullkrusher: farking Stuy Town man... friend of mine's dad got her in there back in the waiting list days. I think she's still paying under $2k for a 2 BR


Then you have my GF, who lives in Stuy Town with a roommate and apparently took the first apartment they showed her and is paying WAY too much for a converted 2-BR.  We're going to be moving in together in a couple months, and I've been slowing tempering her expectations for a 1-BR for the both of us.

On the plus side, her rent will be coming down substantially.
 
2013-04-23 11:39:24 AM  

Arkanaut: James!: sigdiamond2000: James!: I spent 23 dollars on Vietnamese food the other day, had it delivered to my apartment after 11 at night and had enough for lunch the next day.

Uhhhh...ummmm...HISPTER!!11

Look at this motherfarker:
[tomjinadventures.files.wordpress.com image 660x327]

There's three kinds of pork in that motherfarker.  DID YOU OBSERVE THOSE WORDS?

THREE KINDS OF PORK!

Bacon, ham, and porkchops?


Next he'll be telling us those are all from the same magical animal...
 
2013-04-23 11:41:06 AM  

dynomutt: So that is an observation without performing interviews?  That seems like studying elephant dung.  They're humans, ask questions!  I suspect the answer you'd get from them is "I dunno".  And "I dunno" = mesmerized to buy whatever the glowing box tells them to.


I don't remember. I took the class probably 20 years ago :-)
 
2013-04-23 11:42:04 AM  

sigdiamond2000: James!: I spent 23 dollars on Vietnamese food the other day, had it delivered to my apartment after 11 at night and had enough for lunch the next day.

Uhhhh...ummmm...HISPTER!!11


Recently I ordered a gluten free pulled pork, red onion, horseradish-yogurt  waffle, had it delivered. With a side of Kale chips. $25 with tip. It felt a little hipstery
 
2013-04-23 11:43:13 AM  
To be fair, the article does say that for wealthy people NYC is financially a good deal. Of coure wealthy is a relative term for those who are considered to be wealthy in NYC vs. wealthy somewhere else. But for poorer people it's not so great. Which generally means, everyone else.

I'm in Park Slope and managed to bag a 2k/month 2 BR. Hoping that we can stay for a very very long time as I am not wealthy.

Wish I had the money to buy in Park Slope 10 years ago when you could get a place on the cheap.
 
2013-04-23 11:43:56 AM  

James!: I really doubt that most rural farkers live on vast tracts of land like they claim.  Most people live in tract housing out in the boonies and spend most of their day commuting.


4 bedroom house, 3 car garage on 6 acres, 2 of which are lake.  12 pecan trees, 5 fruit trees (planting more soon) and a vegetable garden.  14 minutes from work.  Deer, geese, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, raccoons - all kinds of wildlife in the area, even beavers (fark you if you eat another of my trees, dammit!).  And yes, that's a *good* thing.  That's the way i like it.

One hour from either of two major metro areas, when I have to resort to that kind of thing.  I've been in big cities all over the world and every one of them is interesting to visit, but hold no permanent sway.
 
2013-04-23 11:44:47 AM  

Hipchewy1: Recently I ordered a gluten free pulled pork, red onion, horseradish-yogurt waffle, had it delivered. With a side of Kale chips. $25 with tip. It felt a little hipstery


All I can say is "Mile End Deli".
 
2013-04-23 11:44:57 AM  

freewill: travoltron: So you've been to my hometown. Good for you for making it out alive. It's the land where dreams go to die.

I live in Binghamton, dude.

To some of these unfortunates, I may as well live in opulence in Hong Kong because my power stays on after a strong wind.


I'm from Potsdam, and the wife is from Owego. Provided you aren't super creepy and a complete waste of space, if you're here in the city, I have four taps set up in my dining room, come get a beer. It's like a tour in 'nam in rural NYS. (though Binghamton is a huge city by comparison to Potsdam)
 
2013-04-23 11:44:58 AM  
I simply don't understand why anyone would choose to live in NYC when you can live just about anywhere else without all the hassle.
 
2013-04-23 11:45:22 AM  

Yanks_RSJ: skullkrusher: farking Stuy Town man... friend of mine's dad got her in there back in the waiting list days. I think she's still paying under $2k for a 2 BR

Then you have my GF, who lives in Stuy Town with a roommate and apparently took the first apartment they showed her and is paying WAY too much for a converted 2-BR.  We're going to be moving in together in a couple months, and I've been slowing tempering her expectations for a 1-BR for the both of us.

On the plus side, her rent will be coming down substantially.


IIRC they do fark you over by making you "rent" their ACs for a ridiculous amount of money
 
2013-04-23 11:45:33 AM  

Ethertap: I live in south Georgia, I pay 500 bucks a month for a 1000 square-foot apartment.  In return for my tiny rent, I get to live in a town with no bar, no nightlife, no restaurant variety, and no culture.

When I got my job offer here I thought the pay was pretty lousy, 10% under national average for new hires in my field.  Then I looked up cost of living in the area and realized why it was that low.

The way I look at living in a place like New York, Chicago, Boston, or San Francisco (among others) is that despite the high cost of living, at least theres things to do, places to go, and interesting things to eat.


And you get high humidity to boot.

How far out of Atlanta or Jax are you?
 
2013-04-23 11:46:33 AM  

CtrlAltDestroy: A vehicle also affords A LOT of freedom. There's no ties to bus/train time schedules. Or worrying about missing the last train of the night. Or having to wonder or figure out if the available transportation is will where you want it to go. I have 2 cars and 3 motorcycles. I enjoy driving/riding and working on motorized toys.


Dude, none of this really applies to NYC, at least not in the expensive locations (most of manhattan and the cool parts of Brooklyn) where public transportation is plentiful. I've never "missed the last train." That doesn't happen. 

public transportation is actually QUICKER than having a car in NYC. Quicker thank taxis too most of the time. In a major city, cars are limiting, not freeing. You have to move them, pay for them, and deal with them wiithout much benefit.
 
2013-04-23 11:50:42 AM  

freewill: travoltron: So you've been to my hometown. Good for you for making it out alive. It's the land where dreams go to die.

I live in Binghamton, dude.

To some of these unfortunates, I may as well live in opulence in Hong Kong because my power stays on after a strong wind.


A relative talked me in to moving from JC to Deposit...it's like a whole other country!
 
2013-04-23 11:51:28 AM  
Look, it's all about what YOU value in life.

If you want to be able to walk down the block and go to a bar, a restaurant, a nightclub, a museum, a park, a theatre, or whatever else you can think of, you want to live in a big city.  If you're interested in staying home, cooking for yourself, watching your home theater, owning a car, and having a big backyard, you probably want a suburb of a smaller city.  If you want to grow your own food, shoot your guns for target practice, hunt on your own land, ride 4-wheelers, or that sort of thing, you want to live in a rural area.

Different people value different things, you all know this, and you're arguing about it anyway.

As for me, I like having a 2k square foot house near downtown in a medium size city.  I'm easy walking distance to 4 bars (including a gay bar), 3 restaurants, a natural foods grocery store, three mechanics, two bus lines, a non-chain coffee shop, and several parks.  A longer walk or 5-10 minute drive will get me to another 30 or so bars, about the same number of restaurants (most of them not chains), 20 fast food places, a major university, a few theatres, and quite a few other things to do.  Oh, and the house was under $100k, and I don't have a HOA to deal with.
 
2013-04-23 11:52:15 AM  

Bill Frist: CtrlAltDestroy: A vehicle also affords A LOT of freedom. There's no ties to bus/train time schedules. Or worrying about missing the last train of the night. Or having to wonder or figure out if the available transportation is will where you want it to go. I have 2 cars and 3 motorcycles. I enjoy driving/riding and working on motorized toys.

Dude, none of this really applies to NYC, at least not in the expensive locations (most of manhattan and the cool parts of Brooklyn) where public transportation is plentiful. I've never "missed the last train." That doesn't happen. 

public transportation is actually QUICKER than having a car in NYC. Quicker thank taxis too most of the time. In a major city, cars are limiting, not freeing. You have to move them, pay for them, and deal with them wiithout much benefit.


If all of your friends and family are in NYC, you don't need a car.  If that's not the case, then it becomes a huge pain in the ass to visit anyone or do anything else outside the city.  Sure you can take a train/bus to your destination but you do become extremely reliant on people who have cars when the train or bus stops.
 
2013-04-23 11:52:45 AM  

Bill Frist: Dude, none of this really applies to NYC, at least not in the expensive locations (most of manhattan and the cool parts of Brooklyn) where public transportation is plentiful. I've never "missed the last train." That doesn't happen.

public transportation is actually QUICKER than having a car in NYC. Quicker thank taxis too most of the time. In a major city, cars are limiting, not freeing. You have to move them, pay for them, and deal with them wiithout much benefit.


I was talking about people trying to figure out equal costs between city life to suburb life. The idea here is that vehicle costs need to be applied to housing costs when trying to compare the two lifestyles. All of what I said DOES apply to suburb life. My point is that this additional cost also comes with additional benefits because of this.

Reading comprehension. Learn it, use it, love it.
 
2013-04-23 11:53:14 AM  

Longtime Lurker: dumbobruni: Longtime Lurker: Chicago FTW. Virtually everything NYC has at half the cost.

/1200 for a brand new gut rehab 1br, and I'm really overpaying compared to my neighbors.
//not getting into the pizza debate

with similar salaries for most jobs.

Well I'm a medical resident, so that's one of the downsides. Residents have some of the lower salary/cost of living ratios in the country. Also once I get through training, it's sad that salaries rise exponentially the farther away from the city core you get. A guy who graduated from my program was pulling down 2x as much pay to work in Aurora than another graduate who stayed in the city doing the same job with more hours.


Medical residents in chicago have low ratios, I should say. Programs I interviewed at in upstate NY and Detroit actually had higher salaries despite rent being next to nothing in both places. NYC resident salaries are actually are a bit higher and most hospitals have subsidzed housing.
 
2013-04-23 11:53:18 AM  

Hipchewy1: sigdiamond2000: James!: I spent 23 dollars on Vietnamese food the other day, had it delivered to my apartment after 11 at night and had enough for lunch the next day.

Uhhhh...ummmm...HISPTER!!11

Recently I ordered a gluten free pulled pork, red onion, horseradish-yogurt  waffle, had it delivered. With a side of Kale chips. $25 with tip. It felt a little hipstery


not sure if you know this or not, but, as far as i understand, all pork is gluten free.  gluten is like some wheat thing.  you would have to add gluten to pork, which doesn't seem sensible. i've noticed products have lately presented themselves as gluten free.  but, those products have no relation to wheat whatsoever.  so, i just want to warn you, often "gluten-free" is as valuable as salt advertising that it's sugar free.
 
2013-04-23 11:54:29 AM  

RatOmeter: James!: I really doubt that most rural farkers live on vast tracts of land like they claim.  Most people live in tract housing out in the boonies and spend most of their day commuting.

4 bedroom house, 3 car garage on 6 acres, 2 of which are lake.  12 pecan trees, 5 fruit trees (planting more soon) and a vegetable garden.  14 minutes from work.  Deer, geese, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, raccoons - all kinds of wildlife in the area, even beavers (fark you if you eat another of my trees, dammit!).  And yes, that's a *good* thing.  That's the way i like it.

One hour from either of two major metro areas, when I have to resort to that kind of thing.  I've been in big cities all over the world and every one of them is interesting to visit, but hold no permanent sway.


All that and your lovely wife, Morgan Fairchild.
 
2013-04-23 11:56:28 AM  

DarkVader: Look, it's all about what YOU value in life.

If you want to be able to walk down the block and go to a bar, a restaurant, a nightclub, a museum, a park, a theatre, or whatever else you can think of, you want to live in a big city.  If you're interested in staying home, cooking for yourself, watching your home theater, owning a car, and having a big backyard, you probably want a suburb of a smaller city.  If you want to grow your own food, shoot your guns for target practice, hunt on your own land, ride 4-wheelers, or that sort of thing, you want to live in a rural area.

Different people value different things, you all know this, and you're arguing about it anyway.

As for me, I like having a 2k square foot house near downtown in a medium size city.  I'm easy walking distance to 4 bars (including a gay bar), 3 restaurants, a natural foods grocery store, three mechanics, two bus lines, a non-chain coffee shop, and several parks.  A longer walk or 5-10 minute drive will get me to another 30 or so bars, about the same number of restaurants (most of them not chains), 20 fast food places, a major university, a few theatres, and quite a few other things to do.  Oh, and the house was under $100k, and I don't have a HOA to deal with.


Yep, these debates are normally stupid because people are just arguing about different things. I couldn't care less about having " fruit trees" in my backyard. (Note: I grew up on tons of land in a semi-rural area, so I know what I'm missing). But it isn't going to impress someone who cares about that and not, say, theater to know about all the options in NYC.

To each his own.

The other thing that has to be factored in here is one's career. If you are doing anything in the arts (books, music, theater, comedy, TV, etc.) the benefits to living in NYC over any other city* is pretty staggering. No amount of back yard space makes up for the connections, events, and career benifits of a city like NYC for many careers.

*A few semi-exceptions like Chicago for theater and comedy, or LA for comedy and film
 
2013-04-23 11:58:33 AM  
Didn't we just have this thread just yesterday?
 
2013-04-23 11:58:39 AM  

andrewskdr: Bill Frist: CtrlAltDestroy: A vehicle also affords A LOT of freedom. There's no ties to bus/train time schedules. Or worrying about missing the last train of the night. Or having to wonder or figure out if the available transportation is will where you want it to go. I have 2 cars and 3 motorcycles. I enjoy driving/riding and working on motorized toys.

Dude, none of this really applies to NYC, at least not in the expensive locations (most of manhattan and the cool parts of Brooklyn) where public transportation is plentiful. I've never "missed the last train." That doesn't happen. 

public transportation is actually QUICKER than having a car in NYC. Quicker thank taxis too most of the time. In a major city, cars are limiting, not freeing. You have to move them, pay for them, and deal with them wiithout much benefit.

If all of your friends and family are in NYC, you don't need a car.  If that's not the case, then it becomes a huge pain in the ass to visit anyone or do anything else outside the city.  Sure you can take a train/bus to your destination but you do become extremely reliant on people who have cars when the train or bus stops.


It all depends on your lifestyle. Some people might need to drive constantly to Illinois. Others won't travel to another city more than twice a year. Personally, my family live an easy Amtrak ride a way and I have no need for a car.

But really, event he people who do have cars in NYC still use public transportation for 99% of their daily travel.
 
2013-04-23 11:59:41 AM  

travoltron: I'm from Potsdam, and the wife is from Owego. Provided you aren't super creepy and a complete waste of space, if you're here in the city, I have four taps set up in my dining room, come get a beer. It's like a tour in 'nam in rural NYS. (though Binghamton is a huge city by comparison to Potsdam)


potsdam does have some darn good mexican food though. is that little wine bar still there? i want on a succesful date with a clarkson girl there once and had an excellent meal. i lived in canton for a few years when i was really young (pre-k) and then went to st. lawrence for my 4 year
 
2013-04-23 12:00:17 PM  
I have/had relatives who lived/worked in NYC and when they used to come down here to visit in Florida, decades ago, they always drove big cars, carried wads of cash, talked loudly and a lot.

I was a kid then. They tended to annoy me. They were often arguing amongst themselves over nearly anything. They had bought a big old wooden house after WW2 and all of them lived in it. They all worked in factories.

My folks, who were from New Jersey, used to tell me stories about how great it was to go into NYC and shop and the many things you could see and do. When they first moved down into my (then) small town, they lamented the fact that there were no pizza places, they had to get grocery stores to special order the makings for spaghetti for them, no deli's and none of the rich sausages they were used to.

They were impressed at how inexpensive the town was -- until my Dad went job hunting and discovered the pay was cheap also.

My folks used to impress on me that NYC was great in many places and the pay rates were higher, but the cost of living was very high.

I was taken to NYC for a visit when I was too young to remember -- except for bits and pieces of the train ride. I haven't been back.

My older brother, shortly after leaving the military in the 70's, went there to visit with his wife and told me trying to drive through the city was a nightmare. Since then he's been all over the US with his motor home but has not gone back to NYC.

For me, the idea of living in a city where you're basically shoulder to shoulder with people and it seems to go on for miles and miles, is a version of hell. I like greenery and wild woods. While much of that is vanishing here, there are still some spots to be found.

NYC sounds like a fascinating place, with all sorts of cool things to buy and my folks raved about the assorted foods, but I don't think I'd do well there. Plus I've seen the tiny apartments that cost more to rent than a huge house down here and wonder why folks want to live that way.
 
2013-04-23 12:00:53 PM  

travoltron: I'm from Potsdam, and the wife is from Owego. Provided you aren't super creepy and a complete waste of space, if you're here in the city, I have four taps set up in my dining room, come get a beer. It's like a tour in 'nam in rural NYS. (though Binghamton is a huge city by comparison to Potsdam)


I work in the city about every three months, Union Square. Yeah, we should connect.

/ Owego. Does she know a place called John Barleycorn?

CtrlAltDestroy: A vehicle also affords A LOT of freedom. There's no ties to bus/train time schedules. Or worrying about missing the last train of the night. Or having to wonder or figure out if the available transportation is will where you want it to go. I have 2 cars and 3 motorcycles. I enjoy driving/riding and working on motorized toys.


Honestly, in NYC, a car restricts your freedom, if anything. You have to worry about traffic, parking, etc. I like to drive recreationally, too, but it's basically impossible to be stranded in Manhattan/the good, close parts of Brooklyn. The trains generally run every few minutes and are ridiculously fast.

Even being upstate, working from home, a car is basically just what you said: a motorized toy that I play with on weekends. There's a bus system here if I need it. It *is* fun to have a car, but I think I'd sooner eat a bullet than live in another place where I essentially have to spend thousands/year feeding a car just to handle the essentials of life. What kills me is that the further you get from infrastructure, the more lower-income people seem to be unwilling to even consider the idea that having to pay for that is basically making them poor. An acquaintance of mine commutes 30 miles to work on one of two job sites from rural Chenango County, makes $20/hour (which is pretty OK up there), starts every day $36 in the hole on roundtrip mileage expenses, yet can't figure out why he's 24 and can't afford to move out of his father's house. (Maybe it's because you live so far from a grocery store or Walmart/Target that it's cheaper to pay 50% more for stuff at an expensive convenience store?) Meanwhile, he has to get up at 4 AM to get to work on time, so living there is pretty much ruining his life.

I chose to move to a place where I could ride the bus until I could afford toys. It was arguably among the best choices I ever made.
 
2013-04-23 12:02:31 PM  

andrewskdr: If all of your friends and family are in NYC, you don't need a car.  If that's not the case, then it becomes a huge pain in the ass to visit anyone or do anything else outside the city.  Sure you can take a train/bus to your destination but you do become extremely reliant on people who have cars when the train or bus stops.


This. Like I said, personal vehicles offer a lot of freedom. Like that guy that I used to know. If it was outside of the city, or on the other side of the city, he bummed rides from people. All the while sticking to this idea that he has no use for a car. Which, I guess as long as there were patient people willing to drive him around, he kinda didn't.

But if one is the kind of person who never feels the need to leave a major city, then I guess that doesn't matter. They're severally limiting their experience in life by doing so, but that's their choice. Those people also aren't allowed to talk about non city living as they lack the experience required to actually understand it.

/Did city living for a few years.
//Much prefers the suburbs.
 
2013-04-23 12:02:46 PM  

James!: RatOmeter: James!: I really doubt that most rural farkers live on vast tracts of land like they claim.  Most people live in tract housing out in the boonies and spend most of their day commuting.

4 bedroom house, 3 car garage on 6 acres, 2 of which are lake.  12 pecan trees, 5 fruit trees (planting more soon) and a vegetable garden.  14 minutes from work.  Deer, geese, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, raccoons - all kinds of wildlife in the area, even beavers (fark you if you eat another of my trees, dammit!).  And yes, that's a *good* thing.  That's the way i like it.

One hour from either of two major metro areas, when I have to resort to that kind of thing.  I've been in big cities all over the world and every one of them is interesting to visit, but hold no permanent sway.

All that and your lovely wife, Morgan Fairchild.


Not my type at all.  Mine is the over-educated, Engrish speaking type.
 
2013-04-23 12:03:31 PM  
Subby gets Jimmy McMillan's endorsement.
farm6.staticflickr.com
 
2013-04-23 12:03:42 PM  

James!: sigdiamond2000: James!: I spent 23 dollars on Vietnamese food the other day, had it delivered to my apartment after 11 at night and had enough for lunch the next day.

Uhhhh...ummmm...HISPTER!!11

Look at this motherfarker:
[tomjinadventures.files.wordpress.com image 660x327]

There's three kinds of pork in that motherfarker.  DID YOU OBSERVE THOSE WORDS?

THREE KINDS OF PORK!


Are you sure that's not cat?
 
2013-04-23 12:03:43 PM  

FLMountainMan: College towns are the way to go.  I live downtown in a three bedroom home with a $750/month mortgage, walk to work, get to see ACC basketball, football, and baseball, usually for free or dirt cheap.  Also get up-and-coming bands in town to play to all the college kids.  And a constantly churning supply of 18-26 year old women really tips the dating dynamic in the men's favor.  Best of both worlds.


Moving there next summer.  Book it, done!  I can't wait.
 
2013-04-23 12:05:12 PM  

Pocket Ninja: Hm. Where is this $2,200/month studio apartment?


I think Subby is my brother. This sounds like his rent, and yes studio means studio.
 
2013-04-23 12:05:22 PM  

CtrlAltDestroy: But if one is the kind of person who never feels the need to leave a major city, then I guess that doesn't matter. They're severally limiting their experience in life by doing so, but that's their choice. Those people also aren't allowed to talk about non city living as they lack the experience required to actually understand it.


Man, your logic is really poor. Living in a city w/o a car doesn't "severally limit" your life experience. First off, major cities offer far more life experiences than the suburbs. But even without that, you do realize that.... planes and trains and buses and many other types of transportation exists, not just cars?

I come from a small city and my family all have cars. They rarely travel further than I do on a daily basis in NYC. And they travel to OTHER cities and other parts of the world much less than me.

Some people have cars and drive all over the country and continent. But most don't gain "life experience" with their car. They just shuttle between home, work and McDonalds.
 
2013-04-23 12:06:35 PM  

pute kisses like a man: Hipchewy1: sigdiamond2000: James!: I spent 23 dollars on Vietnamese food the other day, had it delivered to my apartment after 11 at night and had enough for lunch the next day.

Uhhhh...ummmm...HISPTER!!11

Recently I ordered a gluten free pulled pork, red onion, horseradish-yogurt  waffle, had it delivered. With a side of Kale chips. $25 with tip. It felt a little hipstery

not sure if you know this or not, but, as far as i understand, all pork is gluten free.  gluten is like some wheat thing.  you would have to add gluten to pork, which doesn't seem sensible. i've noticed products have lately presented themselves as gluten free.  but, those products have no relation to wheat whatsoever.  so, i just want to warn you, often "gluten-free" is as valuable as salt advertising that it's sugar free.


I'm well aware, I have Celiac disease. The waffle was gluten free.
 
2013-04-23 12:07:09 PM  
Also worth pointing out that Zipcar and similar programs are pretty cheap and easy. Most of my friends in NYC don't have cars, but we fairly frequently rent Zipcars to go out of town. 

Owning a car in a city really doesn't have any benefits for 99% of people.
 
2013-04-23 12:07:33 PM  

James!: All that and your lovely wife, Morgan Fairchild.


Why is it so hard to believe that people can own large areas of land? You're either trolling something inane or extremely dense.

freewill: Honestly, in NYC, a car restricts your freedom, if anything.


True. I hate driving in a major city. But this is only so for as only as long as one remain within the city limits. If that's your thing, then ok. But many cannot live confined like that.
 
2013-04-23 12:10:41 PM  

Krieghund: DamnYankees: Regional 'cost of living' as some sort of basis of radjustment is mostly crap. The reason it costs of a ton of money to live in New York is that living in New York is a 'good' which is in very high demand. Living here is a form of consumption. We don't subsidize consumption, and we don't pity people for consuming.

Subsidizing New Yorkers is the price we pay for keeping them in New York.


Subsidizing the rest of the country is the price we pay for keeping people like you out.
 
2013-04-23 12:13:16 PM  

Job Creator: Krieghund: DamnYankees: Regional 'cost of living' as some sort of basis of radjustment is mostly crap. The reason it costs of a ton of money to live in New York is that living in New York is a 'good' which is in very high demand. Living here is a form of consumption. We don't subsidize consumption, and we don't pity people for consuming.

Subsidizing New Yorkers is the price we pay for keeping them in New York.

Subsidizing the rest of the country is the price we pay for keeping people like you out.


Yeah... New Yorkers are not subsidized. We pay far more in taxes, and actually subsidize the shiatty rural parts.
 
2013-04-23 12:13:34 PM  

CtrlAltDestroy: Why is it so hard to believe that people can own large areas of land? You're either trolling something inane or extremely dense.


Or I'm making a joke using an SNL reference.  Untwist your pants.
 
2013-04-23 12:13:52 PM  
Rik01:NYC sounds like a fascinating place, with all sorts of cool things to buy and my folks raved about the assorted foods, but I don't think I'd do well there. Plus I've seen the tiny apartments that cost more to rent than a huge house down here and wonder why folks want to live that way

In NYC, home is where you go to sleep, and where you store your stuff.  You don't spend as much time at home as you do in rural areas, which is why having a lot of space isn't that important.  What is important for us big-city people is location.  To be near everything.  Art spaces, galleries, museums, restaurants, cheap food, bars, work, and so on.  And many of these places are open 24/7, so if you feel like having a pizza and chat with some people at 3am, you can just walk out the door and do just that.

When I lived in the suburbs I hated the finality of getting home.  You went home, and that was it for the day.  Maybe watch a little TV, go online for a bit, then bedtime.  In the city I have that option, or I can just walk right out and go do something.  Or not even go home at all until whatever time I chose.

I agree, it isn't for everyone.  But it does have its appeal for others, myself included.  And it it has nothing to do with cool things to buy.
 
2013-04-23 12:14:34 PM  

Molavian: If you can't get laid in a town with nothing to do, you're doing it wrong.


This. I've lived in the same general area as Ethertap, a town with the same business (although I worked a different business), and that's all I did. That and internet my brain and drive to the coast every weekend so I didn't crazy.
 
2013-04-23 12:17:38 PM  

enforcerpsu: I simply don't understand why anyone would choose to live in NYC when you can live just about anywhere else without all the hassle.

=======================

I don't live the in city, I live in Jersey just a short train ride away.   I do own a car, but most days I don't bother to use it.   I can walk to a large super market, numerous shops, and a huge mall with every conceivable chain store is a short mass transit trip away.  I can walk to the post office, doctor's office, hospital, etc.  I can get on the train and be in mid-town Manhattan in 15 minutes.

A friend of mine moved to the Poconos in Pennsylvania.  The post office is eight miles from his house.  Nearest gas station is 10 miles.  Nearest supermarket is 12 miles.  There is no mass transit.  We're only one Mideast whack-job away from $10-$12 dollar a gallon gas.  How do you live in such a place when gas is $10/gal?
 
Displayed 50 of 250 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report