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(USA Today)   And thus began the conquest of six countries by the invasive giant redwood army, leaving skeletons of kangaroos a hundred feet in the air   (usatoday.com) divider line 80
    More: Strange, sequoia, reforestation, Crescent City, planting, skeletons, SSTs, whales, trees  
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13581 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Apr 2013 at 2:19 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-22 01:40:22 PM  
Farking clones. Next it'll be sheep.
 
2013-04-22 02:20:36 PM  
What the fark are you talking about?
 
2013-04-22 02:21:11 PM  
I'm okay with this
 
2013-04-22 02:21:53 PM  
APPROVES:

advanced-television.com
 
2013-04-22 02:25:02 PM  
It's a worthwhile effort, if for no other reason than to make giant trees happen. I'm for it.
 
2013-04-22 02:26:25 PM  
You know, redwoods aren't the only NorCal flora known to invade other regions...

Right, dude?

www.gannett-cdn.com
 
2013-04-22 02:27:07 PM  
18" trees?  What is this?  A forest for ants?
 
2013-04-22 02:28:18 PM  
We have farking eucalyptus all over Northern CA, so the least we could do is return the favor.
 
2013-04-22 02:28:26 PM  
approves
thainsbook.net
 
2013-04-22 02:28:29 PM  
is it possible that the poor things got tangled in the saplings and starved, and then the trees grew up around them?
 
2013-04-22 02:29:59 PM  
also approves
thetorchonline.com
 
2013-04-22 02:30:49 PM  
SAY NO TO GMO!
 
2013-04-22 02:33:01 PM  
While I like the idea of the big trees, wouldn't faster growing trees be a better option? Part of the reason the trees live so long is because they grow slowly.

So wouldn't you want to use something that gets to a good size in 20 years rather than 200?
 
2013-04-22 02:33:12 PM  
"long-lived" != best, or even best for its ecosystem. It's ecological ignoramuses like this who have farked up ecosystems with invasive species in their efforts to "help". Frankly I'm amazed that they've got permission to plant these in some of the countries mentioned where they have incredibly tight restrictions on non-native species. New Zealand, for example, is already being overrun but introduced pines. It's reforesting where it was never forested before and the native animals are not adapted to it. New Zealand also already has a native giant tree: the kauri. So they're going to run that into extinction with an introduced tree?

Not to mention that forests everywhere might not actually be the solution, and that grasslands and wetlands might be a better idea for a lot of places.

Idiots.
 
2013-04-22 02:35:30 PM  
images2.cosmicbooknews.com
Also approves
 
2013-04-22 02:36:10 PM  
I should have said "best for the ecosystem you're introducing it to". The giant redwoods have an ecosystem already, and that's where they should be encouraged.

I also should have said "by introduced pines".
 
2013-04-22 02:37:21 PM  

Slives: While I like the idea of the big trees, wouldn't faster growing trees be a better option? Part of the reason the trees live so long is because they grow slowly.

So wouldn't you want to use something that gets to a good size in 20 years rather than 200?


This idea isn't about doing actual good.  It's symbolic.  Like the War on Poverty or the War on Drugs.
 
2013-04-22 02:40:17 PM  
Kudzu on an absolutely galactic scale...
 
2013-04-22 02:41:59 PM  
came for Groot, left satisfied.

/I AM GROOT!
 
2013-04-22 02:42:08 PM  

Slives: So wouldn't you want to use something that gets to a good size in 20 years rather than 200?


Depends on whether you want the tree to be around in 25 years or 1000.
 
2013-04-22 02:43:48 PM  

Slives: While I like the idea of the big trees, wouldn't faster growing trees be a better option? Part of the reason the trees live so long is because they grow slowly.

So wouldn't you want to use something that gets to a good size in 20 years rather than 200?


I'm no tree-talking guy, but I have a Coast Redwood in my yard that I grew from about thumb-sized.  I started 5 1/2 years ago and it's no less than 8' tall, and very bushy.

I don't know how fast that is compared to others...All I know is that it grows a hell of a lot faster than the Japanese Maple I planted at the same time.  It was about a foot tall, now it's about two feet tall.
 
2013-04-22 02:49:29 PM  
Step one: plant 18"redwood tree
step two: wait 300 years
step three: turn sequestered carbon into fashionable and resilient deck material.
 
2013-04-22 02:54:00 PM  
www.gannett-cdn.com
Dude, let's smoke it.
 
2013-04-22 02:54:08 PM  
Redwoods grow quite quickly in the right conditions.  However they stay within a fairly narrow environmental range, and they need things like fog to grow to great height.
 
2013-04-22 02:55:40 PM  

FLMountainMan: Slives: While I like the idea of the big trees, wouldn't faster growing trees be a better option? Part of the reason the trees live so long is because they grow slowly.

So wouldn't you want to use something that gets to a good size in 20 years rather than 200?

This idea isn't about doing actual good.  It's symbolic.  Like the War on Poverty or the War on Drugs.


This, want to help reforest an area in 20 years? Plant pine trees except pine trees are ugly, messy, and common.
 
2013-04-22 02:55:54 PM  

texdent: [images2.cosmicbooknews.com image 300x660]
Also approves


How does tree dude put on or take off that snazzy uniform?
 
2013-04-22 02:56:37 PM  
Trees grow from the top.  A nail hammered into the trunk of a tree with be at the same height 200 years later.

The nail will not move up the tree as it grows.

SCIENCE!
 
2013-04-22 02:56:51 PM  
I think that most of the redwoods in northern California are second growth trees except for isolated areas like Muir Woods.
 
2013-04-22 03:00:40 PM  

Evil High Priest: texdent: [images2.cosmicbooknews.com image 300x660]
Also approves

How does tree dude put on or take off that snazzy uniform?


Uh...unstable molecules?
 
2013-04-22 03:02:53 PM  

KWillets: Redwoods grow quite quickly in the right conditions.  However they stay within a fairly narrow environmental range, and they need things like fog to grow to great height.


This. The ring thicknesses on some of the coastal redwood stumps are HUGE.
 
2013-04-22 03:04:08 PM  

ruta: Frankly I'm amazed that they've got permission to plant these in some of the countries mentioned where they have incredibly tight restrictions on non-native species.


The article did not mention anything about getting permission.
They're going to do good, whether it kills someone or not.
 
2013-04-22 03:04:47 PM  

dryknife: I think that most of the redwoods in northern California are second growth trees except for isolated areas like Muir Woods.


And Humboldt Redwoods, and Prairie Creek, and Jedediah Smith.  Had to mention those because I worked at them ;)  Other, much smaller groves of old growth exist.

But most of what exists is second growth.  Areas that were logged in the late 1800s/early 1900s still have damn tall trees, just not in the 350'+ range.
 
2013-04-22 03:11:51 PM  
Shouldn't they use baobabs?
 
2013-04-22 03:21:45 PM  
This is pretty stupid. I mean, having giant sequoias here and there to look at is cool, but it's not going to do much actual good. If you're trying to sequester carbon, it's probably better to have a plant community that grows fast, dies fast and is buried fast, rather than extremely long-lived trees. This is beyond the fact that they're not native, though that's probably less of a concern with sequoias due to (what I assume is) a narrow environmental tolerance range.

/better than pavement
 
2013-04-22 03:26:31 PM  
FTA: said Tom Burke, landscape manager at the College of Marin. "We've had redwoods in this area since God planted them."

Meth Addict says what?

/Please don't mix science and religion, otherwise you end up with a Monsanto corporation preaching that food with its own insecticide is good for people when its not.
//YumYum. These food tastes awesome with all the roundup still on it.
 
2013-04-22 03:34:07 PM  
California redwood invading the world? So like... Navajo interracial gay porn?
 
2013-04-22 03:34:56 PM  
There's no problem with planting redwoods and sequoias in Australia; we'll just send them some rabbits to keep the tree population under control.
 
2013-04-22 03:41:13 PM  
I came for a Far Side cartoon, leaving disappointed.
 
2013-04-22 03:58:43 PM  
thebrandrackley.files.wordpress.com
Also approves
 
2013-04-22 04:00:22 PM  

puckrock2000: There's no problem with planting redwoods and sequoias in Australia; we'll just send them some rabbits to keep the tree population under control.


And a few snakes will help keep the rabbit population down.  I think Florida has a few to spare.
 
2013-04-22 04:05:02 PM  

WelldeadLink: ruta: Frankly I'm amazed that they've got permission to plant these in some of the countries mentioned where they have incredibly tight restrictions on non-native species.

The article did not mention anything about getting permission.
They're going to do good, whether it kills someone or not.


I'm all for planting trees, but for cryin' out loud, plant the stuff that's supposed to grow there in the first place... and ask permission first, or someone's just going to come along and rip it out anyway.
 
2013-04-22 04:09:19 PM  
Fun fact:  100 years ago or so, Australia had trees taller than any existing Redwoods today.
 
2013-04-22 04:21:40 PM  

FLMountainMan: Slives: While I like the idea of the big trees, wouldn't faster growing trees be a better option? Part of the reason the trees live so long is because they grow slowly.

So wouldn't you want to use something that gets to a good size in 20 years rather than 200?

This idea isn't about doing actual good.  It's symbolic.  Like the War on Poverty or the War on Drugs.


This.

Emotional "feel good" thinking.
 
2013-04-22 04:42:53 PM  

FLMountainMan: SAY NO TO GMO!


Cloning isn't GMO. All your organic apples are clones from parent specimen.
 
2013-04-22 04:54:10 PM  
"We need to reforest the planet; it's imperative. To do that, it just makes sense to use the largest, oldest, most iconic trees that ever lived," Milarch said.

So you pick one of the slowest maturing species on the planet?

img.groundspeak.com

Teddy Roosevelt planted this tree in 1903.

/I know, I know, poor growing conditions, etc...but still...find an endangered native species and bring that farker back
/I know, I know, global warming changing native environment to inhospitable...but still...
 
2013-04-22 05:05:09 PM  
LockeOak:

If you're trying to sequester carbon, it's probably better to have a plant community that grows fast, dies fast and is buried fast, rather than extremely long-lived trees.

Rotting trees give up almost all the carbon they sequestered. A pine tree might sequester carbon for ~70 years, fall over, and give it all back in 10. A sequoia might start slow, but would gather carbon at an increasing rate and hold on to it for 1000+ years.

In fact, the best balance might be: plant a bunch of useful, fast growing wood that you can build lasting structures out of, prevent the wood from rotting and get some use out of it at the same time.
 
2013-04-22 05:22:47 PM  
We see redwoods

amarkedman.com
 
2013-04-22 05:42:52 PM  

maxheck: LockeOak:

If you're trying to sequester carbon, it's probably better to have a plant community that grows fast, dies fast and is buried fast, rather than extremely long-lived trees.

Rotting trees give up almost all the carbon they sequestered. A pine tree might sequester carbon for ~70 years, fall over, and give it all back in 10. A sequoia might start slow, but would gather carbon at an increasing rate and hold on to it for 1000+ years.

In fact, the best balance might be: plant a bunch of useful, fast growing wood that you can build lasting structures out of, prevent the wood from rotting and get some use out of it at the same time.


I'm arguing your latter point, and you don't need sequoias for that. That said, planting a few in urban parks would be cool, but arguing that a handful of sequoias are sequestering meaningful amounts of carbon is a bit silly.
 
2013-04-22 05:55:55 PM  

LockeOak: maxheck: LockeOak:

If you're trying to sequester carbon, it's probably better to have a plant community that grows fast, dies fast and is buried fast, rather than extremely long-lived trees.

Rotting trees give up almost all the carbon they sequestered. A pine tree might sequester carbon for ~70 years, fall over, and give it all back in 10. A sequoia might start slow, but would gather carbon at an increasing rate and hold on to it for 1000+ years.

In fact, the best balance might be: plant a bunch of useful, fast growing wood that you can build lasting structures out of, prevent the wood from rotting and get some use out of it at the same time.

I'm arguing your latter point, and you don't need sequoias for that. That said, planting a few in urban parks would be cool, but arguing that a handful of sequoias are sequestering meaningful amounts of carbon is a bit silly.


I agree... but would also say that planting short-lived "junk" trees doesn't do anything for the carbon balance if they're left to rot. Converting them to paper products is the same so far as carbon, but at least we get *some* use from it.

/ In my darker moments at work I think of saying "fark this, I'm quitting and starting a structural bamboo farm."
 
2013-04-22 06:02:36 PM  
"A pine tree might sequester carbon for ~70 years, fall over, and give it all back in 10 "

If only there were some type of wood that was naturally rot resistant.
 
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