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(Fox News)   Mississippi river closed at Vicksburg. This is not a repeat from 1863   (foxnews.com) divider line 66
    More: Dumbass, Vicksburg, American Electric Power, barges  
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10239 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Apr 2013 at 12:02 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-22 12:06:00 AM
How does one "close" a river?

Is that how floods happen?
 
2013-04-22 12:09:14 AM

wildcardjack: How does one "close" a river?

Is that how floods happen?


Dam?
 
2013-04-22 12:09:22 AM
Can we close it at Chicago while we're at it?

/f--king asian carp

wildcardjack: How does one "close" a river?

Is that how floods happen?


Sure, why not.

Water traffic can't get through, that's all.   Gonna be a financial hit for some, but probably not as bad as last year when the river was too low for many boats to even pass through certain areas.
 
2013-04-22 12:12:26 AM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-22 12:14:30 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: probably not as bad as last year when the river was too low for many boats to even pass through certain areas.


You remind me of when everyone was jumping up and down at how happy they were that spring was finally here on the last week of March. Maybe you should wait until, say, July, and see how the river situation is.
 
2013-04-22 12:14:48 AM
Okay, I live less than a mile from that bridge.  I'm going to have to go see if anything interesting is going on.

Yes it's a boring night in Mississippi.
 
2013-04-22 12:17:18 AM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-04-22 12:17:58 AM

wildcardjack: How does one "close" a river?

Is that how floods happen?


Short answer: the Army Corps controls navigation on the Mississippi.  They can close the river to shipping whenever they want.
 
2013-04-22 12:19:11 AM
YOU SHALL NOT PASS!!!
 
2013-04-22 12:19:30 AM
You Yanks and your wars. Stop! Stop this nonsense. Be nice.
 
2013-04-22 12:26:43 AM

Dwight_Yeast: wildcardjack: How does one "close" a river?

Is that how floods happen?

Short answer: the Army Corps controls navigation on the Mississippi.  They can close the river to shipping whenever they want.


Umm..wrong!! The USACE only dredges, the Coast Guard determines if the river is to be open or closed to navigation.
 
2013-04-22 12:28:14 AM

texdent: wildcardjack: How does one "close" a river?

Is that how floods happen?

Dam?


No, that's what a fish would say when it hit a wall.
 
2013-04-22 12:32:07 AM
Ooh, so since we're referencing the American War of Northern Aggression Civil War, I get to break out this gem:

Who's buried in Grant's Tomb?
 
2013-04-22 12:32:37 AM
That's nothing. Jimi Hendrix closed at Woodstock.
 
2013-04-22 12:33:20 AM
He'll just keep rolling along.
 
2013-04-22 12:36:23 AM
But where will they bury the survivors?
 
2013-04-22 12:38:16 AM

texdent: wildcardjack: How does one "close" a river?

Is that how floods happen?

Dam?

the torpedoes, full speed ahead!

/Okay, I think that was Mobile Bay, but close enough
 
2013-04-22 12:38:30 AM
s13.postimg.org
 
2013-04-22 12:39:34 AM

gman01: Umm..wrong!! The USACE only dredges, the Coast Guard determines if the river is to be open or closed to navigation.


Well, within spitting distance of being correct.
 
2013-04-22 12:42:25 AM
I'll grant you that was a nice headline, subby.
 
2013-04-22 12:44:42 AM
♪♫ Well I come up the river the other night
Darker than the inside of a cow
Ain't nothin like a crooked old river, straighten my head right out
Now I love my love she's pretty as could be
And I love to take her down
Those pretty ladies really like to ride
When the Captain Buck Lay comes down
When the Captain Buck Lay comes down ♪♫


/ John Hartford
 
2013-04-22 12:48:41 AM
It was closed in 1861. It was opened in 1863.
 
2013-04-22 12:53:18 AM
That odd sound you hear is Mark Twain laughing his ass off from the grave.
 
2013-04-22 12:59:45 AM
The incident at Big Beaver?
 
2013-04-22 01:02:51 AM
I live three blocks from that river.  I need to get my ass down to the levee more often for a walk.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-04-22 01:04:24 AM
As someone who builds barges, you gotta fark up something MAJOR in order to sink one of these things. And to have several more in a partially submerged state? What the hell was going on up there? Maybe they aren't the same size as the ones I work on, but damn...
 
2013-04-22 01:06:42 AM

vicejay: I live three blocks from that river.  I need to get my ass down to the levee more often for a walk.

[i.imgur.com image 850x479]

But if the levee breaks you'll have no place to stay....

 
182
2013-04-22 01:17:36 AM

wildcardjack: How does one "close" a river?



ask your mom to cross her legs?
 
2013-04-22 01:17:59 AM

ypsifly: vicejay: I live three blocks from that river.  I need to get my ass down to the levee more often for a walk.

[i.imgur.com image 850x479]

But if the levee breaks you'll have no place to stay....


True...but if I have enough warning, I'm getting *up* on the levee.  High ground.

Related: A couple of years ago, the river here in New Orleans was at a near-historic high.  They had to open floodgates upriver, as they do from time to time, to keep it from getting dangerously high.

And, what I mean by dangerous:  The 'levees' that failed after Katrina were floodwalls that held back water from canals running to/from Lake Pontchartrian.  Therefore, the city flooded to a level consistent with the lake level, which is three feet above sea level.  Many parts of the city (but not all) are slightly below sea level, hence the flooding that ranged from none to a foot to 10 feet.  Many major parts of the city (downtown, french quarter, most of Uptown)  that were built on the highest ground saw no flooding at all.

However: 2 years ago, the river level was at 17 feet above flood level.  The Corps warned that if the river levee got overtopped and scoured out (on the 'Eastbank' side,) the resulting flooding would put the ENTIRE city under 15+ feet of water.
 
2013-04-22 01:21:40 AM

phrawgh: The incident at Big Beaver?


I myself suffered Grevious Jaw injuries.
 
2013-04-22 01:32:26 AM
God Hates Barges? Or is it bridges?
 
2013-04-22 01:34:55 AM

croesius: As someone who builds barges, you gotta fark up something MAJOR in order to sink one of these things. And to have several more in a partially submerged state? What the hell was going on up there? Maybe they aren't the same size as the ones I work on, but damn...


No Cares maybe< no back gouging to sound metal ---Who knows --    Clean your
tungsten  Nasty
 
2013-04-22 01:40:17 AM
vicejay:
True...but if I have enough warning, I'm getting *up* on the levee.  High ground.

Related: A couple of years ago, the river here in New Orleans was at a near-historic high.  They had to open floodgates upriver, as they do from time to time, to keep it from getting dangerously high.

And, what I mean by dangerous:  The 'levees' that failed after Katrina were floodwalls that held back water from canals running to/from Lake Pontchartrian.  Therefore, the city flooded to a level consistent with the lake level, which is three feet above sea level.  Many parts of the city (but not all) are slightly below sea level, hence the flooding that ranged from none to a foot to 10 feet.  Many major parts of the city (downtown, french quarter, most of Uptown)  that were built on the highest ground saw no flooding at all.

However: 2 years ago, the river level was at 17 feet above flood level.  The Corps warned that if the river levee got overtopped and scoured out (on the 'Eastbank' side,) the resulting flooding would put the ENTIRE city under 15+ feet of water.


The rivers here in MI are blown out with some still rising, so I doubt you'll get a reprieve any time soon.  I've been to NOLA before Katrina and fished Ponchartrain and lots of the canals and bayous, so I can see how flood control is a nightmare.

Stay dry and stay safe!

S
 
2013-04-22 02:02:07 AM
Very nice subby!! LOL!!
 
2013-04-22 02:05:50 AM
Check back here soon if you're looking for a job:

Jobs at AEP River Operations/MEMCO Barge Line
 
2013-04-22 02:06:40 AM
DAMMIT MISSISSIPPI
 
2013-04-22 02:08:26 AM
Isn't it weird how the weather conditions are behaving in such a way that we are bouncing back and forth from one extreme (no water) to the other (too much water)? And we are cycling through them so quickly. I wish there was some one who would have warned us this could happen.
 
2013-04-22 02:18:30 AM
graveyardsdb.com

"War is hell!" - General Sheridan
 
2013-04-22 02:20:34 AM
A little Farker Trivia, I helped paint the murals in that town.
 
2013-04-22 02:30:39 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: Isn't it weird how the weather conditions are behaving in such a way that we are bouncing back and forth from one extreme (no water) to the other (too much water)? And we are cycling through them so quickly. I wish there was some one who would have warned us this could happen.



Nostradamus...Al Gore...Art Bell?

I live in a place where the weather seems to always be off kilter, so I take it in stride.

Looking back through history, the weather has always been in a state of flux...our current abilities to monitor and disseminate that information makes things appear extreme, but in the grand scheme of things, its just nature doing what nature does.  An ice age scenario or the weather patterns the planet experienced during the age of the dinosaurs will or will not happen...eventually.
 
2013-04-22 02:39:39 AM

ypsifly: Uchiha_Cycliste: Isn't it weird how the weather conditions are behaving in such a way that we are bouncing back and forth from one extreme (no water) to the other (too much water)? And we are cycling through them so quickly. I wish there was some one who would have warned us this could happen.


Nostradamus...Al Gore...Art Bell?

I live in a place where the weather seems to always be off kilter, so I take it in stride.

Looking back through history, the weather has always been in a state of flux...our current abilities to monitor and disseminate that information makes things appear extreme, but in the grand scheme of things, its just nature doing what nature does.  An ice age scenario or the weather patterns the planet experienced during the age of the dinosaurs will or will not happen...eventually.


agreed. But that is sort of ignoring or white washing away the fact we ARE having an effect and we COULD do something to minimize the upcoming baadness. Just from a fiscal standpoint its much cheaper to prevent these things from happening than to deal with them after they do.
 
2013-04-22 02:41:16 AM
Damn the bridges...full speed ahead!!!!

/Iron clads rule
 
2013-04-22 02:44:12 AM

maram500: Ooh, so since we're referencing the American War of Northern Aggression Civil War, I get to break out this gem:

Who's buried in Grant's Tomb?


Is this a trick question?
 
2013-04-22 02:47:29 AM

LDM90: maram500: Ooh, so since we're referencing the American War of Northern Aggression Civil War, I get to break out this gem:

Who's buried in Grant's Tomb?

Is this a trick question?


Can't be a trick question because no math is involved.
 
2013-04-22 02:51:27 AM

Point02GPA: LDM90: maram500: Ooh, so since we're referencing the American War of Northern Aggression Civil War, I get to break out this gem:

Who's buried in Grant's Tomb?

Is this a trick question?

Can't be a trick question because no math is involved.


Duh! Jimmy Hoffa of course
 
2013-04-22 02:52:25 AM
Uchiha_Cycliste: agreed. But that is sort of ignoring or white washing away the fact we ARE having an effect and we COULD do something to minimize the upcoming baadness. Just from a fiscal standpoint its much cheaper to prevent these things from happening than to deal with them after they do.


While I agree with you in terms o thef micro level. in terms the big picture I'll have to quote George Carlin:

"The planet has been through a lot worse than us. Been through earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, continental drift, solar flares, sun spots, magnetic storms, the magnetic reversal of the poles ... hundreds of thousands of years of bombardment by comets and asteroids and meteors, worldwide floods, tidal waves, worldwide fires, erosion, cosmic rays, recurring ice ages ... And we think some plastic bags and some aluminum cans are going to make a difference? The planet isn't going anywhere. WE are!

We're going away. Pack your shiat, folks. We're going away. And we won't leave much of a trace, either. Maybe a little Styrofoam ... The planet'll be here and we'll be long gone. Just another failed mutation. Just another closed-end biological mistake. An evolutionary cul-de-sac. The planet'll shake us off like a bad case of fleas."At the end of the day, we don't matter so much as the planet, in terms of the climate on a larger scale, will keep on keepin' on as it has and will continue to do in spite of us.
 
2013-04-22 02:52:26 AM

The All-Powerful Atheismo: "War is hell!" - General Sheridan


Cool pic of Gen. Grant ya got there
 
2013-04-22 02:56:38 AM

duke3522: The All-Powerful Atheismo: "War is hell!" - General Sheridan

Cool pic of Gen. Grant ya got there


Nice catch. Tip of the Ol' Hat to ya.
 
2013-04-22 02:57:14 AM

ypsifly: Uchiha_Cycliste: agreed. But that is sort of ignoring or white washing away the fact we ARE having an effect and we COULD do something to minimize the upcoming baadness. Just from a fiscal standpoint its much cheaper to prevent these things from happening than to deal with them after they do.


While I agree with you in terms o thef micro level. in terms the big picture I'll have to quote George Carlin:

"The planet has been through a lot worse than us. Been through earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, continental drift, solar flares, sun spots, magnetic storms, the magnetic reversal of the poles ... hundreds of thousands of years of bombardment by comets and asteroids and meteors, worldwide floods, tidal waves, worldwide fires, erosion, cosmic rays, recurring ice ages ... And we think some plastic bags and some aluminum cans are going to make a difference? The planet isn't going anywhere. WE are!

We're going away. Pack your shiat, folks. We're going away. And we won't leave much of a trace, either. Maybe a little Styrofoam ... The planet'll be here and we'll be long gone. Just another failed mutation. Just another closed-end biological mistake. An evolutionary cul-de-sac. The planet'll shake us off like a bad case of fleas."At the end of the day, we don't matter so much as the planet, in terms of the climate on a larger scale, will keep on keepin' on as it has and will continue to do in spite of us.


All true, and when the BIG shiat that we can't control happens survival is gonna suck. In the mean tim we can stop dumpng geenhouse gases in the atmosphere and killing the oceans. Why not do what we can so when the big stff hits we aren't already at an overwhelming disadvantage?
 
2013-04-22 03:35:33 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: ypsifly: Uchiha_Cycliste: agreed. But that is sort of ignoring or white washing away the fact we ARE having an effect and we COULD do something to minimize the upcoming baadness. Just from a fiscal standpoint its much cheaper to prevent these things from happening than to deal with them after they do.


While I agree with you in terms o thef micro level. in terms the big picture I'll have to quote George Carlin:

"The planet has been through a lot worse than us. Been through earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, continental drift, solar flares, sun spots, magnetic storms, the magnetic reversal of the poles ... hundreds of thousands of years of bombardment by comets and asteroids and meteors, worldwide floods, tidal waves, worldwide fires, erosion, cosmic rays, recurring ice ages ... And we think some plastic bags and some aluminum cans are going to make a difference? The planet isn't going anywhere. WE are!

We're going away. Pack your shiat, folks. We're going away. And we won't leave much of a trace, either. Maybe a little Styrofoam ... The planet'll be here and we'll be long gone. Just another failed mutation. Just another closed-end biological mistake. An evolutionary cul-de-sac. The planet'll shake us off like a bad case of fleas."At the end of the day, we don't matter so much as the planet, in terms of the climate on a larger scale, will keep on keepin' on as it has and will continue to do in spite of us.

All true, and when the BIG shiat that we can't control happens survival is gonna suck. In the mean tim we can stop dumpng geenhouse gases in the atmosphere and killing the oceans. Why not do what we can so when the big stff hits we aren't already at an overwhelming disadvantage?


As someone who tries to minimize his carbon footprint, I agree with you, but I can't help but think that when the big gears start turning, whatever is gonna happen will happen, in spite of us.

Its all about micro versus macro.  I'm trying to do right and not shiat the bed the bed I sleep in so I can enjoy things like clean air and water, and biodiversity when I go fishing and hiking...but at some point we will go the way of the dinosaur.

This thread has reminded me that I need to drag the recycling bin to the curb before turning in for the night.  I'm finishing my beer and getting ready to do just that.
 
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