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(CBS News)   Hubble finds new nebula for its 23rd birthday which looks... really freakin cool. Hey look, something happened this week that doesn't suck   (cbsnews.com) divider line 41
    More: Cool, Hubble Space Telescope, nebulae, Hubble, horsehead nebula, Wide Field Camera 3, James Webb Space Telescope, interstellar clouds, infrared  
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5239 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Apr 2013 at 11:12 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-04-20 10:37:30 PM  
Wait a minute, that thing looks like Jar Jar Binks. Cancel the headline, the week still sucks.
 
2013-04-20 10:39:48 PM  

flucto: Wait a minute, that thing looks like Jar Jar Binks. Cancel the headline, the week still sucks.


As the submitter, I approve of this message.

/I'm laughing so hard I'm crying
 
2013-04-20 10:44:27 PM  
That's a cool pic, but we've known about the Horsehead Nebula since at least 1888.
 
2013-04-20 10:44:31 PM  
i.i.com.com
Meesa all fulla gas
 
2013-04-20 10:54:50 PM  
SCIENCE.
 
2013-04-20 11:17:00 PM  
Don't need a telescope to spot that extra apostrophe.
 
2013-04-20 11:18:31 PM  
That's the Horsehead Nebula of a different color.
 
2013-04-20 11:27:19 PM  
Well, maybe now you do.
 
2013-04-20 11:33:11 PM  
Is Jesus there?
 
2013-04-20 11:47:56 PM  
This is now a Things That Happened This Week That Didn't Suck thread.

Went to an old college friend's 50th birthday party last night. Got to see some people I hadn't seen in a long time. The girl I had a debilitating crush on for a long time back then was there, everything about her still a perfect storm of loveliness and charm to me. Got to chat for a bit. She hugged me as we were all leaving. Bring on your troubles and worries, world; I am now far beyond their reach.
 
2013-04-20 11:48:23 PM  

BalugaJoe: Is Jesus there?


Space Jesus is.
 
2013-04-21 12:02:19 AM  

Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: That's a cool pic, but we've known about the Horsehead Nebula since at least 1888.


If you own a telescope, it was probably one of your first targets.

With less Jar Jar:

farm4.staticflickr.com
 
2013-04-21 12:17:10 AM  
That's a think of beauty.  I wish we could travel there.
 
2013-04-21 12:21:59 AM  
I think I know someone who would be really interested in this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWQm8EvfTJw
 
2013-04-21 12:25:10 AM  

nucrash: That's a think of beauty.  I wish we could travel there.


You wouldn't see it from inside it....
 
2013-04-21 12:35:05 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: That's a cool pic, but we've known about the Horsehead Nebula since at least 1888.

If you own a telescope, it was probably one of your first targets failures.


More realistic.
 
2013-04-21 12:37:27 AM  
Trouble with the nebula, sir, is all that static discharge and gas clouds our tactical display. Visual won't function and shields will be useless.
 
2013-04-21 12:39:50 AM  
i think it looks like the rock golem guy from neverending story...beautiful
 
2013-04-21 12:50:11 AM  

GypsyJoker: common sense is an oxymoron: Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: That's a cool pic, but we've known about the Horsehead Nebula since at least 1888.

If you own a telescope, it was probably one of your first targets failures.

More realistic.



You win.
 
2013-04-21 12:55:11 AM  
www.badmovies.org

Approves
 
2013-04-21 01:08:01 AM  
The Luckdragon Nebula?
 
2013-04-21 01:15:26 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: GypsyJoker: common sense is an oxymoron: Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: That's a cool pic, but we've known about the Horsehead Nebula since at least 1888.

If you own a telescope, it was probably one of your first targets failures.

More realistic.


You win.


Nah.  It probably is one of the most-requested objects at public observing nights, and no doubt everyone getting a telescope naively tries to observe it right off.  It's just that so few actually have really seen it.

Saw it myself in a 24" Obsession from central New Mexico with an H-Beta filter under amazing sky conditions, and then later that night in a 17" unfiltered.  Never saw it before or since then, even if NGC 2024 was visible (it's one of the key indicators; if you can't see the Flame, you probably won't catch the Horsehead).  But not for lack of trying!
 
2013-04-21 01:42:41 AM  

Clockwork Kumquat: This is now a Things That Happened This Week That Didn't Suck thread.

Went to an old college friend's 50th birthday party last night. Got to see some people I hadn't seen in a long time. The girl I had a debilitating crush on for a long time back then was there, everything about her still a perfect storm of loveliness and charm to me. Got to chat for a bit. She hugged me as we were all leaving. Bring on your troubles and worries, world; I am now far beyond their reach.


Let her go, man.
 
2013-04-21 02:29:29 AM  
Is it possible to observe any discernible change in the structure of these nebula, like watching a cloud morph?
 
2013-04-21 02:36:09 AM  
Probably all gone now. Just can't have nice things...
 
2013-04-21 02:51:28 AM  

ipsofacto: Is it possible to observe any discernible change in the structure of these nebula, like watching a cloud morph?


I'm sure there will be visible change over a few millennia

/probably many rather than few
 
2013-04-21 04:10:53 AM  
Submitter reading comprehension FAIL.

Submitters are not even trying slip a fail past us anymore. Hell, to find it we don't even have to read past the first sentence.
 
2013-04-21 05:07:10 AM  

ipsofacto:

Is it possible to observe any discernible change in the structure of these nebula, like watching a cloud morph?
Sure.  Just sit VERY still for a few thousand years... They change VERY slowly, in the human scale.
 
2013-04-21 06:57:01 AM  

chewielouie: Trouble with the nebula, sir, is all that static discharge and gas clouds our tactical display. Visual won't function and shields will be useless.


Phaser lock inoperative...

Best guess Mr Sulu, fire when ready...
 
2013-04-21 06:57:23 AM  

GeneralJim: ipsofacto: Is it possible to observe any discernible change in the structure of these nebula, like watching a cloud morph?Sure.  Just sit VERY still for a few thousand years... They change VERY slowly, in the human scale.


neuroflare: ipsofacto: Is it possible to observe any discernible change in the structure of these nebula, like watching a cloud morph?

I'm sure there will be visible change over a few millennia

/probably many rather than few


Based upon what we can observe/ have observed, is there any sort of modeling we can do in rolling the clock forward or back; or would this be little more than artistic conception?
 
2013-04-21 07:31:41 AM  
Some space craft end up being a waste of money...some end up going WAY further than planned.

Hubble is one of the good ones.  (with a bit of a tweak near the start...)
 
2013-04-21 09:36:01 AM  

GeneralJim: ipsofacto: Is it possible to observe any discernible change in the structure of these nebula, like watching a cloud morph?Sure.  Just sit VERY still for a few thousand years... They change VERY slowly, in the human scale.


That's certainly true, but we've also observed expansion in some very young, very nearby nebulae--the Crab Nebula, for example.  (The remnant of SN1987A is another.) While fairly subtle, we can indeed observe some change within the Crab's filamentary structure over the years. Not surprising, really, since the explosion that created the nebula itself was witnessed less than a thousand years ago.

upload.wikimedia.org

SN1987A:

www.holoscience.com

There are also nebulae like Hubble's Variable Nebula and Gyulbudaghian's Nebula that appear to change shape and brightness year-by-year.  Much of that is due to variability of the very young stars illuminating these nebulae, but some of it is speculated to be caused by dust clouds within the nebulae blocking the light as they move, as well.  So the changes in the nebula's shape here are the result of physical changes we can't directly observe, as those dust clouds aren't themselves observed directly.

Hubble's Variable Nebula:

www.reinervogel.net

Here's a small clip of changes in the Crab Nebula over seven months. (Granted, these are observed in X-ray light, but there are visible-light changes as well.)
 
2013-04-21 09:40:51 AM  
Well, that doesn't suck at all. It blows.
 
das
2013-04-21 10:58:40 AM  
...and next time The Hubble breaks, it's done.
 
2013-04-21 12:04:57 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: Herr Docktor Heinrich Wisenheimer: That's a cool pic, but we've known about the Horsehead Nebula since at least 1888.

If you own a telescope, it was probably one of your first targets.

With less Jar Jar:

[farm4.staticflickr.com image 615x640]


You need at least a 10" scope to see the horsehead visually, most backyard scopes won't be able to show it, so I doubt that it was one of most people's first targets. I can barely see it in my 12.5" on a good night, and the only time I was sure that I saw it was using a 17".  It is famous because of the shape in photos, but quite difficult to see visually unless you have a monster scope.
 
2013-04-21 12:12:06 PM  
I thought it looked more like the fearsome Cthulhu than Jar-Jar.
 
2013-04-21 12:30:31 PM  

Pelvic Splanchnic Ganglion: BalugaJoe: Is Jesus there?

Space Jesus is.


Space Lincoln is waaaaay cooler.

img.trekmovie.com
 
2013-04-21 01:35:25 PM  
i see a man wearing a ten gallon hat with his fists raised for fighting.  anyone else see this?
 
2013-04-21 02:03:55 PM  
Cumshot Nebula...
 
2013-04-21 05:53:18 PM  
Damn, I can remember a time when people called Hubble the greatest failure of the space program after the problems with the lenses. Amazing to think how it's pulled a complete 180 since then.
 
2013-04-21 11:58:12 PM  

Summoner101: Clockwork Kumquat: This is now a Things That Happened This Week That Didn't Suck thread.

Went to an old college friend's 50th birthday party last night. Got to see some people I hadn't seen in a long time. The girl I had a debilitating crush on for a long time back then was there, everything about her still a perfect storm of loveliness and charm to me. Got to chat for a bit. She hugged me as we were all leaving. Bring on your troubles and worries, world; I am now far beyond their reach.

Let her go, man.


Nah, it's not like that. It's finding out that some catastrophic screwup that you did long ago doesn't matter and it's all ok after all. Just one mistake of many, of course, but it mattered. I valued her friendship.

As a token gesture to staying on topic, years ago I took some long (maybe 5 or 10 minutes, don't remember) tracking shots of Orion using film, of course, and a barndoor tracking mount. The results were rather... meh, but it was fun, and anyway here is a clip of the belt and sword area. Pushing the curves and saturation makes the inverted L shape of the Horsehead's gas cloud faintly visible. It's a damned hard thing to observe visually.

farm9.staticflickr.com
 
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