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(STLToday)   As if this country hasn't been through enough this week, river towns are now preparing for the rising Mississippi River to flood   (stltoday.com) divider line 75
    More: Scary, Mississippi River, flash floods, Mississippi, East St. Louis, Heavy Rain, Lincoln County, Jay Nixon, floods  
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3698 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Apr 2013 at 5:36 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-20 03:47:27 PM  
Well let me just say this if they need the sandbags they can go to the Politics tab on the Fark.com website where they can do the filling of these through the vaginas of many of the people who do the posting at this location.  LAUGHTER OL I am saying this as it is the common colloquialism which is used on the Fark.com website for describing the person upon which has the butt hurtings.  I am not one who is literal and do not wish for giving false hope to the individuals upon this area as to think they will have the freedom of sanding.  Semper flies river folk.
 
2013-04-20 04:41:10 PM  
Of all the things that have happened this week, this is easily the most avoidable. People are throwing fits over the proximity of people to the West plant, saying "OH NOES! How could they build a plant near people?!", forgetting that the plant was there first and the people moved in around it. But people who build in areas absolutely guaranteed to flood with regularity get a pass. It's completely avoidable, totally idiotic, and I'm having a hard time generating too much sympathy for their plight. Maybe I'll have some next year when it happens again, or even the year after that, but not now.
 
2013-04-20 05:19:15 PM  

meow said the dog: Well let me just say this if they need the sandbags they can go to the Politics tab on the Fark.com website where they can do the filling of these through the vaginas of many of the people who do the posting at this location.  LAUGHTER OL I am saying this as it is the common colloquialism which is used on the Fark.com website for describing the person upon which has the butt hurtings.  I am not one who is literal and do not wish for giving false hope to the individuals upon this area as to think they will have the freedom of sanding.  Semper flies river folk.


LO LOUD, indeed! Very much sand could easily be collected from the places that match the description of that which you mentioned (i.e. personal areas L OUT L), and in due time certainly a lot of such material could most certainly be placed into a bag which could be used to update the situation and perhaps a better outcome would be accomplished.
 
2013-04-20 05:37:01 PM  
Three months ago they were spending millions to dredge the river deeper to overcome the drought. So it should hold lots more water, right?
 
2013-04-20 05:39:36 PM  
We just need to fill in that goddamned ditch and be done with it.
 
2013-04-20 05:40:25 PM  
While scary, the annual snow melt and resulting flooding is kind of an annual thing.
 
2013-04-20 05:40:47 PM  
Why in hell do people still live that close to the mississippi river? About every 2 to 3 years, in the spring, like clockwork, shiat hits the fan and things flood like crazy. Stop acting surprised.
 
2013-04-20 05:41:24 PM  
The snow is melting???

THANKS OBAMA
 
2013-04-20 05:42:08 PM  

Matthew Keene: We just need to fill in that goddamned ditch and be done with it.


The water will still exist.  It has to go somewhere.  Where will the water go if you fill in the ditch?
 
2013-04-20 05:42:08 PM  
I'm sorry folks, we had to do something with all that water. I guess we picked you.
-LOL
-Chicago
 
2013-04-20 05:43:00 PM  

Bucky Katt: While scary, the annual snow melt and resulting flooding is kind of an annual thing.


It's a combination of that and the fact that parts of Missouri, Illinois, and Iowa got a months worth of rain within a few hours last week.
 
2013-04-20 05:43:24 PM  

edmo: Three months ago they were spending millions to dredge the river deeper to overcome the drought. So it should hold lots more water, right?


The drought was a false flag, to give the government an excuse to dredge the river to make it flow faster, to flood out the God-fearing people downriver.
 
2013-04-20 05:45:50 PM  
Chicago was flooded this week with all that rain they got. Some crazy weather happening in the Central U.S.
 
2013-04-20 05:46:10 PM  
Isn't that kind of what massive rivers do? Why live there if you aren't prepared to deal with this type of thing?

God is in control," said member Kathy Pettibone.

*facepalm*
 
2013-04-20 05:46:19 PM  

LollyS: I'm sorry folks, we had to do something with all that water. I guess we picked you.
-LOL
-Chicago


Have the sewers stop shooting water into the air and the ground stop eating cars yet?
 
2013-04-20 05:46:21 PM  

Don't worry guys

'GOD IS IN CONTROL'


He's got a proven track record with this sort of thing.

Goddie, yer doin' a heckuva job.
 
2013-04-20 05:46:33 PM  
The Mayans are still laughing at us.
 
2013-04-20 05:47:08 PM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: But people who build in areas absolutely guaranteed to flood with regularity get a pass. It's completely avoidable


I've always thought that, too, but also I know some areas became flood-prone because they were settled.

A town near a river gets built above the flood area. As the town grows, surrounding higher ground gets settled and paved. The water has nowhere to go except into the formerly dry town.
 
2013-04-20 05:48:46 PM  
I live in van down by the river, and I can't move it because it's on blocks (had to pawn my rims for beer money.)

/any charitable folks out there willing to sponsor me a month or two for Total Fark?
 
2013-04-20 05:49:25 PM  

skinink: Chicago was flooded this week with all that rain they got. Some crazy weather happening in the Central U.S.


It was pretty bad down here in St. Louis too...obviously.

At least we didn't get any tornadoes this time around. That was last week.
 
2013-04-20 05:50:30 PM  

jake3988: Why in hell do people still live that close to the mississippi river? About every 2 to 3 years, in the spring, like clockwork, shiat hits the fan and things flood like crazy. Stop acting surprised.


"about every 2 to 3 years" is not "clockwork"
 
2013-04-20 05:51:24 PM  

edmo: Three months ago they were spending millions to dredge the river deeper to overcome the drought. So it should hold lots more water, right?


Correct, but all this "new" water is lighter than the "old" water in the river so it can't get down to those dredged out spots, and that's why you get the flooding.
 
2013-04-20 05:57:47 PM  
Do not push too strongly the sympathy button.
 
2013-04-20 05:58:26 PM  
maybe the idiots will get washed downstream
 
2013-04-20 05:58:29 PM  
God is in control," said member Kathy Pettibone.

What's the matter, honey? Is there a bomber napping in your ark?
 
2013-04-20 06:08:12 PM  
They built their houses in flood zones, they knew what they were getting into!
enemiesofreason.co.uk
I say, let them drown!
 
2013-04-20 06:11:21 PM  
FTFA:

"Mark Fuchs, hydrologist at the Weather Service office in Weldon Spring, said rain was forecast for Monday and Tuesday in the upper- and middle-Mississippi valley. He said that could add to the crest, but it's too early to tell. "

I really do hope that the Monday and Tuesday rain doesn't add to this mess, for fuchs sake.
 
2013-04-20 06:13:07 PM  
People live near rivers because, historically, it was the cheapest and quickest method of getting bulk goods from point A to point B (and it *still* is). Cities grew up around those old river ports and river junctions as a result of people wanting to be near where those goods were being shipped from and delivered to. It wasn't until the advent of the steam and internal combustion engines that people started living in places that *weren't* near river ports and junctions. Those old river towns just got too big and settled for people to actually apply logic and reason to move away from them (and the reasons for those towns existing where they do *still* applies, at least as far as the major towns and cities are concerned).
 
2013-04-20 06:16:29 PM  
Guess you better start praying harder, motherfarkers.
 
2013-04-20 06:21:59 PM  

ubermensch: jake3988: Why in hell do people still live that close to the mississippi river? About every 2 to 3 years, in the spring, like clockwork, shiat hits the fan and things flood like crazy. Stop acting surprised.

"about every 2 to 3 years" is not "clockwork"


Considering how much grief with the flooding itself, displacement, dealing with insurance, and rebuilding, 2-3 years is clockwork enough.
If it's a farmer that has 100's of acres moving isn't as much of an option. If it's someone who has riverside residence that keeps getting flooded out, ya no sympathy here.
 
2013-04-20 06:22:20 PM  
If only there were ways to build structures to overcome rising water...

Seriously people. Every place has it's natural disaster that building codes have to engineer around to limit catastrophe. Try living in the PNW and not put in design features to mitigate earthquakes.
 
2013-04-20 06:22:44 PM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: Of all the things that have happened this week, this is easily the most avoidable. People are throwing fits over the proximity of people to the West plant, saying "OH NOES! How could they build a plant near people?!", forgetting that the plant was there first and the people moved in around it. But people who build in areas absolutely guaranteed to flood with regularity get a pass. It's completely avoidable, totally idiotic, and I'm having a hard time generating too much sympathy for their plight. Maybe I'll have some next year when it happens again, or even the year after that, but not now.


Live in the area and been sort of skeptical about Chesterfield Valley developments for a while. But people say the flood plains are predictable and that they won't affect a given area for x amount of years, and they must be right from a risk-assessment point of view because that has turned into a huge development and someone is capitalizing and insuring it. I just don't know enough about it. But do you extend the same logic to hurricane victims in Louisiana or wildfire victims in CA?
 
2013-04-20 06:24:05 PM  
It sure is a good thing that the self-professed bootstrappy types live around there.

Good luck and stuff.
 
2013-04-20 06:24:40 PM  

ClavellBCMI: People live near rivers because, historically, it was the cheapest and quickest method of getting bulk goods from point A to point B (and it *still* is). Cities grew up around those old river ports and river junctions as a result of people wanting to be near where those goods were being shipped from and delivered to. It wasn't until the advent of the steam and internal combustion engines that people started living in places that *weren't* near river ports and junctions. Those old river towns just got too big and settled for people to actually apply logic and reason to move away from them (and the reasons for those towns existing where they do *still* applies, at least as far as the major towns and cities are concerned).


It's not just transportation. Floodplain soil tends to be very fertile. Between that and (of course) the water, settling near navigable waters made sense from an agricultural perspective, too. Arguably, it still does...
 
2013-04-20 06:34:29 PM  
Let's not forget the other floody rivers that are having a party this year. For example the Red River (in Canada) of the North (in the US) is expected to be moderate to severe flooding in Manitoba, and Fargo ND is getting their sandbags all ready and in place now. Wisconsin is having some fun - my wife's hometown on the Rock River has some fairly major flooding going on in town. The street her parents lived on is now closed and the park is underwater.  They had that horrible storm Chicago had a few days ago too.

There have been some pretty major flooding events the last few years - moreso than in the past it seems.

/Somebody should move Gays Mills out of the floodplain of the Kickapoo like they did Soldiers Grove. It's underwater MOST years.
 
2013-04-20 06:34:34 PM  
www.expensivenuts.com
 
2013-04-20 06:36:54 PM  
Petition the lord with prayer.
 
2013-04-20 06:38:38 PM  
And earlier this year people were worried that parts of the Miss weren't navigable due to low water.  It's almost like there's a seasonal and multi-seasonal variation to a river which drains 50% of the United States.

In the words of Sam Kinnison - move.
 
2013-04-20 06:46:07 PM  

Canton: ClavellBCMI: People live near rivers because, historically, it was the cheapest and quickest method of getting bulk goods from point A to point B (and it *still* is). Cities grew up around those old river ports and river junctions as a result of people wanting to be near where those goods were being shipped from and delivered to. It wasn't until the advent of the steam and internal combustion engines that people started living in places that *weren't* near river ports and junctions. Those old river towns just got too big and settled for people to actually apply logic and reason to move away from them (and the reasons for those towns existing where they do *still* applies, at least as far as the major towns and cities are concerned).

It's not just transportation. Floodplain soil tends to be very fertile. Between that and (of course) the water, settling near navigable waters made sense from an agricultural perspective, too. Arguably, it still does...


That too. All that river sediment that got deposited on the floodplains of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers every spring meant some good, rich soil for growing crops... at least until us silly humans thought up of ways to fark it all up.
 
2013-04-20 06:47:30 PM  
I'm in Oregon, submitter, nothing has happened to this country and certainly not to this state. What are you talking about, has there been a national incident ? i read in the paper a few days ago there was a crazy guy or 2 in Boston at some race, i guess i'll watch the morning news on monday and see what came of that.   you sound like you need to give your TV to goodwill.
 
2013-04-20 06:48:53 PM  

ClavellBCMI: People live near rivers because, historically, it was the cheapest and quickest method of getting bulk goods from point A to point B (and it *still* is). Cities grew up around those old river ports and river junctions as a result of people wanting to be near where those goods were being shipped from and delivered to. It wasn't until the advent of the steam and internal combustion engines that people started living in places that *weren't* near river ports and junctions. Those old river towns just got too big and settled for people to actually apply logic and reason to move away from them (and the reasons for those towns existing where they do *still* applies, at least as far as the major towns and cities are concerned).


You leave your damned logic out of this, how can we hate on fly-over country when you're telling us that people settled near rivers for transportation, drinking, or irrigation needs. Then by the time technology was capable or transporting those needs over long distances these towns and cities were too established. gtfo.
 
2013-04-20 06:51:49 PM  

Mark Ratner: I live in van down by the river, and I can't move it because it's on blocks (had to pawn my rims for beer money.)

/any charitable folks out there willing to sponsor me a month or two for Total Fark?


You can become a motivational life coach
 
2013-04-20 06:51:55 PM  

Precision Boobery: Don't worry guys

'GOD IS IN CONTROL'

He's got a proven track record with this sort of thing.

Goddie, yer doin' a heckuva job.


But, I have been informed, by a usually reliable source, that it won't be water, but fire next time.
 
2013-04-20 06:55:19 PM  

meow said the dog: Well let me just say this if they need the sandbags they can go to the Politics tab on the Fark.com website where they can do the filling of these through the vaginas of many of the people who do the posting at this location.  LAUGHTER OL I am saying this as it is the common colloquialism which is used on the Fark.com website for describing the person upon which has the butt hurtings.  I am not one who is literal and do not wish for giving false hope to the individuals upon this area as to think they will have the freedom of sanding.  Semper flies river folk.


Laughter ol send the politics tab regulars to MS for charity.
 
2013-04-20 07:06:38 PM  

Rohic: ClavellBCMI: People live near rivers because, historically, it was the cheapest and quickest method of getting bulk goods from point A to point B (and it *still* is). Cities grew up around those old river ports and river junctions as a result of people wanting to be near where those goods were being shipped from and delivered to. It wasn't until the advent of the steam and internal combustion engines that people started living in places that *weren't* near river ports and junctions. Those old river towns just got too big and settled for people to actually apply logic and reason to move away from them (and the reasons for those towns existing where they do *still* applies, at least as far as the major towns and cities are concerned).

You leave your damned logic out of this, how can we hate on fly-over country when you're telling us that people settled near rivers for transportation, drinking, or irrigation needs. Then by the time technology was capable or transporting those needs over long distances these towns and cities were too established. gtfo.


LoL,

My aunt and uncle are in south-east Missouri dealing with this again, just like they have probably twice a decade for the past 35 years. Why? Because they live in house my great grandfather built entirely out of river rock back in the 30s. If they move it's not like the house will remain vacant, so they might as well keep it in the family.
 
2013-04-20 07:08:24 PM  

ClavellBCMI: People live near rivers because, historically, it was the cheapest and quickest method of getting bulk goods from point A to point B (and it *still* is). Cities grew up around those old river ports and river junctions as a result of people wanting to be near where those goods were being shipped from and delivered to. It wasn't until the advent of the steam and internal combustion engines that people started living in places that *weren't* near river ports and junctions. Those old river towns just got too big and settled for people to actually apply logic and reason to move away from them (and the reasons for those towns existing where they do *still* applies, at least as far as the major towns and cities are concerned).

 
2013-04-20 07:10:24 PM  

Ranger Rover: Live in the area and been sort of skeptical about Chesterfield Valley developments for a while.


Glad I'm not the only one. I know that the levee system was upgraded and strengthened after 1993 but with how often these floods seem to occur anymore (although the Missouri doesn't get as bad), I'm still a little skeptical too.
 
2013-04-20 07:19:56 PM  
You could always... NOT LIVE NEXT TO A farkING RIVER!!!
 
2013-04-20 07:22:27 PM  
Why does God hate N America?
Drought, Forever Winter, now floods. And it is 17 year locust time.
We used to such favorites of His.

Maybe we should go back to Truth, Justice and The American Way.
 
2013-04-20 07:25:21 PM  
 The important thing is to remember who voted for Aid for Sandy Victims and who, couldn't be bothered.
 
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