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(ESPN)   Bud $elig'$ late$t chin-$troking blue-ribbon committee initiative to analyze lack of black$ in pro ba$eball ignore$ one $alient fact: Thank$ to travel ball, "baseball in the United States has become a sport for the rich"   (espn.go.com) divider line 54
    More: Obvious, baseball in the United States, Ebal, United States, Southern University, Bud Selig, Bryce Harper, chins, LaTroy Hawkins  
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1576 clicks; posted to Sports » on 20 Apr 2013 at 10:10 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-04-20 09:54:51 AM  
This violates my constitutional right to attend every entertainment event I desire and pay as little as I'd like.
 
2013-04-20 10:19:36 AM  
Since 1986, the percentage of African-Americans in the big leagues has dropped more than half, from 19 percent to 8.5.

So... right about at the level of the African American percentage of the general population? Is it now a problem if black people aren't overrepresented in sports?
 
2013-04-20 10:20:33 AM  
I guess black people from places that aren't the united states aren't black.
 
2013-04-20 10:23:56 AM  

SuperT: I guess black people from places that aren't the united states aren't black.


Or the fact black people travel for football camps and AAU basketball games all the time.

The problem is black kids in America look at football and basketball as the easiest way to make a lot of cash.
 
2013-04-20 10:27:07 AM  
And if they manage to stay with the sport and ahead of their peers, they're the ones whose families can withstand the prohibitive scholarship limit in college baseball that allows for only 11.7 full rides to spread themselves -- in a miraculous, loaves-and-fishes way -- across 35 players.

College baseball rosters have 35 freaking spots? How do you need that many players? Four or five outfielders, four or five infielders, a catcher, a DH, and four or five pitchers. No way should it take more than 22, and I'm pretty sure you could do it with 15.
 
2013-04-20 10:30:39 AM  
Let's not overlook the price of equipment either.  You don't hit as many home runs with a cheap aluminum bat as you do with an expensive composite.  And they need a new one every year as they continue to grow.  Everything about the price of pretty much all youth sports these days has gone crazy.  Then again, adult softball leagues are just as bad.  I need a $300 bat to give my team a chance to be competitive.  And next year they'll tweak the bat rules again and I'm off to buy another one because last year's bat isn't certified anymore.  I'm about ready to say screw it and find a wood bat league.  Make it about the game, not the equipment.  (ok, we'll still be going 3-11 on the season, but we'll be out of excuses)
 
2013-04-20 10:33:11 AM  
Can we do a little to find out about black under-representation in hockey? White under-representation in basketball? Hispanic under-representation in the NFL? THIS IS URGENT.

My goodness. Also, not sure I am buying baseball being a rich-only sport.
 
2013-04-20 10:35:08 AM  

Tommy Moo: And if they manage to stay with the sport and ahead of their peers, they're the ones whose families can withstand the prohibitive scholarship limit in college baseball that allows for only 11.7 full rides to spread themselves -- in a miraculous, loaves-and-fishes way -- across 35 players.

College baseball rosters have 35 freaking spots? How do you need that many players? Four or five outfielders, four or five infielders, a catcher, a DH, and four or five pitchers. No way should it take more than 22, and I'm pretty sure you could do it with 15.


There are 100 spots on a college football roster, so that doesn't seem too crazy.
 
2013-04-20 10:45:23 AM  

Tommy Moo: And if they manage to stay with the sport and ahead of their peers, they're the ones whose families can withstand the prohibitive scholarship limit in college baseball that allows for only 11.7 full rides to spread themselves -- in a miraculous, loaves-and-fishes way -- across 35 players.

College baseball rosters have 35 freaking spots? How do you need that many players? Four or five outfielders, four or five infielders, a catcher, a DH, and four or five pitchers. No way should it take more than 22, and I'm pretty sure you could do it with 15.


They need more spots for injuries that occur. Plus what team, college or otherwise, can go with 3 pitchers and not have their arms drop off
 
2013-04-20 10:46:42 AM  
In several parts of the American southeast, there's a cultural gap between blacks and Hispanics.  Occasionally it's wide enough that there's a hostile undercurrent.  Could that be playing a factor; at the same time as young blacks look more favorably on basketball and football, they see baseball as a game for Latinos and lose interest?
 
2013-04-20 10:47:00 AM  

Tommy Moo: And if they manage to stay with the sport and ahead of their peers, they're the ones whose families can withstand the prohibitive scholarship limit in college baseball that allows for only 11.7 full rides to spread themselves -- in a miraculous, loaves-and-fishes way -- across 35 players.

College baseball rosters have 35 freaking spots? How do you need that many players? Four or five outfielders, four or five infielders, a catcher, a DH, and four or five pitchers. No way should it take more than 22, and I'm pretty sure you could do it with 15.


How do you spread 4 or 5 pitchers over a 3 game weekend series and a midweek game on a regular basis ?
 
2013-04-20 10:50:12 AM  

Richard Sauce: Can we do a little to find out about black under-representation in hockey? White under-representation in basketball? Hispanic under-representation in the NFL? THIS IS URGENT.

My goodness. Also, not sure I am buying baseball being a rich-only sport.


Its not only for the rich, the sponsors pay for their travel/lodging so if there was a black kid that was better they would pay for them to come play.

Its only an issue because people are calling them racists, even though minorities make up most of the league, its just not THEIR minorities so its a problem. The other leagues are majority black so that is not an issue for them, haven't you learned by now those that complain get coddled in modern America?
 
2013-04-20 10:52:04 AM  

USCLaw2010: Tommy Moo: And if they manage to stay with the sport and ahead of their peers, they're the ones whose families can withstand the prohibitive scholarship limit in college baseball that allows for only 11.7 full rides to spread themselves -- in a miraculous, loaves-and-fishes way -- across 35 players.

College baseball rosters have 35 freaking spots? How do you need that many players? Four or five outfielders, four or five infielders, a catcher, a DH, and four or five pitchers. No way should it take more than 22, and I'm pretty sure you could do it with 15.

How do you spread 4 or 5 pitchers over a 3 game weekend series and a midweek game on a regular basis ?


Also, no farm system.  If you wear out your pitchers or lose someone due to injury, you can't call up a AAA hotshot to fill in.
 
2013-04-20 10:52:35 AM  
Old Bud must have sorted out all of MLB's other problems to have so much time to devote to so trivial an 'issue'.  Honestly, when someone looks at the roster of their favorite team does the race of the players even occur to them?  Frankly I don't think it should, and Selig making such a production of this just seems to be insulting to all of us that don't think 'race' when interacting with other people of all different colors.
 
2013-04-20 10:58:05 AM  

UNC_Samurai: In several parts of the American southeast, there's a cultural gap between blacks and Hispanics.  Occasionally it's wide enough that there's a hostile undercurrent.  Could that be playing a factor; at the same time as young blacks look more favorably on basketball and football, they see baseball as a game for Latinos and lose interest?


You dont give blacks much credit for thinking ability
 
2013-04-20 10:59:15 AM  

veale728: Tommy Moo: And if they manage to stay with the sport and ahead of their peers, they're the ones whose families can withstand the prohibitive scholarship limit in college baseball that allows for only 11.7 full rides to spread themselves -- in a miraculous, loaves-and-fishes way -- across 35 players.

College baseball rosters have 35 freaking spots? How do you need that many players? Four or five outfielders, four or five infielders, a catcher, a DH, and four or five pitchers. No way should it take more than 22, and I'm pretty sure you could do it with 15.

They need more spots for injuries that occur. Plus what team, college or otherwise, can go with 3 pitchers and not have their arms drop off


I wish I knew how to post a picture of Augie Garrido with a shiat-eating grin and a caption saying something smarmy about how he rags out his pitchers.
 
2013-04-20 10:59:28 AM  
For spring sports at my high school, the rich kids played soccer or tennis, the rednecks played baseball, and the black kids ran track.  In the fall, the rich kids ran cross country, and everyone else played football.  Of course it wasn't strictly segregated like that, but if I had to make generalizations, that's how it would break down.

/I was on the academic team
 
2013-04-20 11:01:43 AM  

Tommy Moo: Since 1986, the percentage of African-Americans in the big leagues has dropped more than half, from 19 percent to 8.5.

So... right about at the level of the African American percentage of the general population? Is it now a problem if black people aren't overrepresented in sports?


It is an issue when blacks are massively underrepresented compared to the other two largest sports and you are competing for young athletic talent.

Sure, they will try and make it sound like they care about a social issue,  but they are really looking at their next generation of players.
 
2013-04-20 11:35:20 AM  
A lot of you have -completely- missed the point; dywed88 has come the closest to "getting it".

It's not seen as a "problem" per se, more it is "interesting" and potentially "worrying" in regards to the overall health of the sport (meaning fan interest, or in other words, where the cash comes from) looking into the future.

It's not the current percentage that's the issue it's the decline, and it is very much in their best interests to figure out the -why-, as it is potentially indicative of interest in baseball as a whole.
 
2013-04-20 11:36:52 AM  

dywed88: Tommy Moo: Since 1986, the percentage of African-Americans in the big leagues has dropped more than half, from 19 percent to 8.5.

So... right about at the level of the African American percentage of the general population? Is it now a problem if black people aren't overrepresented in sports?

It is an issue when blacks are massively underrepresented compared to the other two largest sports and you are competing for young athletic talent.

Sure, they will try and make it sound like they care about a social issue,  but they are really looking at their next generation of players.


Its not an issue, they are just trying to make it an issue.

If participation was an issue then they would biatch that too many blacks are taking up spots in the NFL/NBA.
 
2013-04-20 11:40:30 AM  

The Bestest: A lot of you have -completely- missed the point; dywed88 has come the closest to "getting it".

It's not seen as a "problem" per se, more it is "interesting" and potentially "worrying" in regards to the overall health of the sport (meaning fan interest, or in other words, where the cash comes from) looking into the future.

It's not the current percentage that's the issue it's the decline, and it is very much in their best interests to figure out the -why-, as it is potentially indicative of interest in baseball as a whole.


Not really, since baseball ratings are up over all, its just black people aren't watching.

There was a reporter here for the AJC who actually biatched because the braves didn't have enough blacks playing in their outfield and cited that as a reason attendance was bad. He never got called on it by anyone other than sports radio, all his editors acted like it never happened.
 
2013-04-20 11:42:00 AM  
It's nice that Selig is looking into representation of blacks in Baseball, but there are other more important issues than that for minorities. Even the lack of minorities in manager positions? That's an ownership problem. With 8.5 percent of players being minorities there's no reason owners/front office people couldn't groom more to become managers of teams.
 
2013-04-20 11:52:30 AM  
Playing any youth sport at an elite level these days is ridiculously expensive.
 
2013-04-20 11:56:02 AM  

M AGRIPPA L F COS TERTIVM SCRIBIT: For spring sports at my high school, the rich kids played soccer or tennis, the rednecks played baseball, and the black kids ran track.  In the fall, the rich kids ran cross country, and everyone else played football.  Of course it wasn't strictly segregated like that, but if I had to make generalizations, that's how it would break down.

/I was on the academic team


At my high school, the rich kids did golf in the fall, lacrosse in the spring, and crew all year round.
 
2013-04-20 12:16:50 PM  
Meh, I played ice hockey in FL...didn't have to worry about it.
 
2013-04-20 12:20:35 PM  

Tommy Moo: Since 1986, the percentage of African-Americans in the big leagues has dropped more than half, from 19 percent to 8.5.

So... right about at the level of the African American percentage of the general population? Is it now a problem if black people aren't overrepresented in sports?


Not to mention the number of non American blacks has sky rocketed.

This is sad.  Maybe David Stern should pay for a study about the lack of whites in basketball.  Racist sport.
 
2013-04-20 12:34:13 PM  
Blacks from Latin countries aren't "Black enough" apparently.  For every Torii Hunter there's at least 3 Vlad Guerrero's now.

NewWorldDan: Let's not overlook the price of equipment either. You don't hit as many home runs with a cheap aluminum bat as you do with an expensive composite. And they need a new one every year as they continue to grow. Everything about the price of pretty much all youth sports these days has gone crazy. Then again, adult softball leagues are just as bad. I need a $300 bat to give my team a chance to be competitive. And next year they'll tweak the bat rules again and I'm off to buy another one because last year's bat isn't certified anymore. I'm about ready to say screw it and find a wood bat league. Make it about the game, not the equipment. (ok, we'll still be going 3-11 on the season, but we'll be out of excuses)


Growing is a little bit, but the bat rules is really the problem.  Every year more bats are banned requiring you to spend a few hundred on a new one for a decent bat.  And, yes, costs are outrageous.  $300 for Pony baseball Spring/$250 for Pony baseball Fall, $450 for Pop Warner football for my son these past few years.  My adult baseball league that I've been playing in for 10 years is $10/game 52 games a year, which is cheaper than Pony considering that's year-round
 
2013-04-20 12:40:59 PM  

NewWorldDan: Make it about the game, not the equipment.


And to elaborate on this, this is how the game is in the Caribbean and Central/South American countries.  If you listen to the stories of various stars from those countries in the league, the poor ones played stickball like games in their youths on streets or poor fields.  Occasionally, a color commentator will comment about how a particularly persons game is influenced by the conditions they were raised on.  You develop pretty good hand-eye coordination when you're hitting a tennisball with a broomstick for power or are continually fielding balls rolling through far worse conditions found on any MLB diamond.
 
2013-04-20 12:53:21 PM  

mikaloyd: UNC_Samurai: In several parts of the American southeast, there's a cultural gap between blacks and Hispanics.  Occasionally it's wide enough that there's a hostile undercurrent.  Could that be playing a factor; at the same time as young blacks look more favorably on basketball and football, they see baseball as a game for Latinos and lose interest?

You dont give blacks much credit for thinking ability


Thinking ability?  I was just postulating on cultural norms and pressures.  When the Colombian and Mexican populations began migrating to this area in the early 90s, there was a good bit of racial tension between the two groups.  Plants like Purina and Firestone had trouble scheduling black and Hispanic employees on the same shifts.  I'm just wondering if that spilled over into extracurricular activities for their kids.
 
2013-04-20 01:03:49 PM  

SuperT: I guess black people from places that aren't the united states aren't black.


There is a significant difference between being African-American and just having black skin in America. Keep pretending there isn't, though.
 
2013-04-20 01:22:24 PM  
Anyone watching the Red Sox pregame.

This is very well done.
 
2013-04-20 01:33:05 PM  
"This is our farkin city!"

LOL Papi
 
2013-04-20 01:37:38 PM  
The dollar signs work better when the headline doesn't directly mention something relating to money or economic status.  This is just overkill.
 
2013-04-20 01:43:52 PM  

IAmRight: SuperT: I guess black people from places that aren't the united states aren't black.

There is a significant difference between being African-American and just having black skin in America. Keep pretending there isn't, though.


Racists don't think "Geez, that damn African-American Brandon Phillips is Black and I hate him, so let me replace him with this African-Dominican Erick Aybar because he's not Black"
 
2013-04-20 01:54:20 PM  

bronyaur1: This violates my constitutional right to attend every entertainment event I desire and pay as little as I'd like.


SuperT: I guess black people from places that aren't the united states aren't black.


You two aren't very bright, are you? That's OK. The world needs ditch diggers, too.
 
2013-04-20 02:06:40 PM  

bhcompy: IAmRight: SuperT: I guess black people from places that aren't the united states aren't black.

There is a significant difference between being African-American and just having black skin in America. Keep pretending there isn't, though.

Racists don't think "Geez, that damn African-American Brandon Phillips is Black and I hate him, so let me replace him with this African-Dominican Erick Aybar because he's not Black"


Which has absolutely fark all to do with this issue.

Pricing out poor kids is VERY VERY bad for the future health of a professional sport. You want to cast your net for young talent as wide as you possibly can. The probable #1 pick in the upcoming NBA draft, Ben McLemore, was so poor growing up in East St Louis, he battled malnourishment at times. He's far from alone.

Soccer in the US faces the same problem as baseball, which is why we continue to be way behind countries as small as Portugal when it comes to talent development.

And quit pretending that white people are just as athletic as black people. It's embarrassing.
 
2013-04-20 02:15:24 PM  

skinink: It's nice that Selig is looking into representation of blacks in Baseball, but there are other more important issues than that for minorities. Even the lack of minorities in manager positions? That's an ownership problem. With 8.5 percent of players being minorities there's no reason owners/front office people couldn't groom more to become managers of teams.


There isn't enough rate of return to groom managers for Major League jobs. Walt Weiss, Mike Matheny, and Ron Gardenhire are the only current managers who have been with the same organization throughout their coaching and managerial careers, not counting Robin Ventura, who had no coaching or managerial experience. Unless you have an opening at the right time and you're not necessarily looking to win right away, you'd be grooming them to beat you working for somebody else.

There are three African American managers among 30 teams - Ron Washington, Dusty Baker and Bo Porter - so the current representation in the managerial pool is about the same, percentage-wise. Two's a little under, three's a little over. More than half of major league managers have had their current jobs for less than three years, so obviously that's subject to change at any time.

On the other hand, you use "minority" in place of "African American", and minority representation on MLB rosters is far more than 8.5%. There are more than 8.5% from the tiny little Dominican Republic (population 10 million) alone. But there are no Dominican managers, and only one Latino, Fredi Gonzalez from Cuba. An argument could be made for the language barrier, but it's a weak one - if you've been involved in pro ball in the United States long enough, you're going to know enough English particularly to deal with baseball terms with baseball players, but to handle post-game press conferences as well.
 
2013-04-20 02:28:38 PM  
That was an interesting point about the weather.  With so many sports becoming year round these days, that puts some of the colder areas that have significant African-American populations at a disadvantage as opposed to the days when everyone switched on the calendar regardless of weather.  I don't think it's a coincidence that the furthest north team that has won the US Championship in the Little League World Series in the new millennium is Louisviile, or the domination of the SEC in recent college football.
 
2013-04-20 02:35:19 PM  

Now That's What I Call a Taco!: bhcompy: IAmRight: SuperT: I guess black people from places that aren't the united states aren't black.

There is a significant difference between being African-American and just having black skin in America. Keep pretending there isn't, though.

Racists don't think "Geez, that damn African-American Brandon Phillips is Black and I hate him, so let me replace him with this African-Dominican Erick Aybar because he's not Black"

Which has absolutely fark all to do with this issue.

Pricing out poor kids is VERY VERY bad for the future health of a professional sport. You want to cast your net for young talent as wide as you possibly can. The probable #1 pick in the upcoming NBA draft, Ben McLemore, was so poor growing up in East St Louis, he battled malnourishment at times. He's far from alone.

Soccer in the US faces the same problem as baseball, which is why we continue to be way behind countries as small as Portugal when it comes to talent development.

And quit pretending that white people are just as athletic as black people. It's embarrassing.


Who said anything about athleticism?

And it's not about price when you compare to other youth sports.  Pop Warner football is more expensive than baseball for youth sports.  Soccer(AYSO) is actually one of the cheapest.  NJB is expensive for basketball and that's AYSO level, not club.  Hockey is cheaper than Pop Warner in my parts, and Lacrosse is the only thing more expensive.

Baseball isn't pricing out young kids, the lack of facilities in areas where the kids that are being discussed and a preference for other sports is taking potential kids out.  Culturally, baseball is the top sport in the Dominican, Cuba, etc, countries that are dominated by Hispanic Blacks.  These are poor countries, but the kids play stickball in the street.  Baseball is a second tier sport in the US for American Blacks.  American Black youth doesn't play stickball in the street(hardly anyone does anymore), they go to the park and play basketball or touch football.

Hoopy Frood: But there are no Dominican managers, and only one Latino, Fredi Gonzalez from Cuba. An argument could be made for the language barrier, but it's a weak one - if you've been involved in pro ball in the United States long enough, you're going to know enough English particularly to deal with baseball terms with baseball players, but to handle post-game press conferences as well.


Scioscia is fluent in Spanish and has Alfredo Griffin on his staff for a reason, and it's been that way longer than they've had a minority owner, as well.  Regardless, if you go to the Dominican, Korean, or Japanese leagues, you're generally getting a local manager.  You mentioned some reasons, like language, but that never stopped Ozzie Guillen(while you're technically correct, he was a manager for many years and is only recently unemployed).
 
2013-04-20 02:41:49 PM  
Around here, lacrosse is the "rich kid" sport. The snarky side of me likes to think that it is because the cost of equipment keeps the poors out of it and in soccer instead, which is just the way the lax parents want it.
 
2013-04-20 02:48:37 PM  

JayCab: Around here, lacrosse is the "rich kid" sport. The snarky side of me likes to think that it is because the cost of equipment keeps the poors out of it and in soccer instead, which is just the way the lax parents want it.


It's always been a preppy sport, like racquetball and tennis(heavily affluent East Asian in California).
 
2013-04-20 03:16:19 PM  
Black people are cool and baseball is lame.
 
2013-04-20 03:52:30 PM  
Meanwhile on the us ski team
 
2013-04-20 04:06:12 PM  

bhcompy: Scioscia is fluent in Spanish and has Alfredo Griffin on his staff for a reason, and it's been that way longer than they've had a minority owner, as well. Regardless, if you go to the Dominican, Korean, or Japanese leagues, you're generally getting a local manager. You mentioned some reasons, like language, but that never stopped Ozzie Guillen(while you're technically correct, he was a manager for many years and is only recently unemployed).


Right, like I said, it's a weak argument, but I was referring to the supposed language barrier of non-native-English-speakers as managers. Ozzie's been recently unemployed twice in the last two years. Nature of the business. Don't forget Felipe Alou, either, and of course there have been less-prominent examples and American-born Hispanics. Still, we're talking about a small number that's never approached the proportion of roster players.

And nobody's ever gotten a major-league managerial job coming straight from a foreign league, nor would I expect it.
 
2013-04-20 04:50:51 PM  

Hoopy Frood: bhcompy: Scioscia is fluent in Spanish and has Alfredo Griffin on his staff for a reason, and it's been that way longer than they've had a minority owner, as well. Regardless, if you go to the Dominican, Korean, or Japanese leagues, you're generally getting a local manager. You mentioned some reasons, like language, but that never stopped Ozzie Guillen(while you're technically correct, he was a manager for many years and is only recently unemployed).

Right, like I said, it's a weak argument, but I was referring to the supposed language barrier of non-native-English-speakers as managers. Ozzie's been recently unemployed twice in the last two years. Nature of the business. Don't forget Felipe Alou, either, and of course there have been less-prominent examples and American-born Hispanics. Still, we're talking about a small number that's never approached the proportion of roster players.

And nobody's ever gotten a major-league managerial job coming straight from a foreign league, nor would I expect it.


How many of them make their permanent home here after their careers, though?  And how many come here just to coach(not anywhere close to as lucrative as being a ballplayer, and there are no foreign coach academies)?  There's no shortage of potential coaching talent and MLB managers have somewhat marginal impacts on the game and the value of the franchise, so there's no one scouting the Dominican for coaches like they are for athletes.  For instance, Fernando is very happy as the Spanish commentator for the Dodgers while coaching for Team Mexico and I don't believe the Dodgers would turn him down if he asked to be a coach in the organization.

Basically what I'm saying is that outside of a few franchises that may have issues with certain cultures, on the large part I don't think it has anything to do with some type of bigotry or prejudice, rather just the pool of known and available talent and the fact that taking risks on unknowns affects franchises in the wallet and with free agents.  Thinking outside of the box isn't favored when it comes to picking executives or staff as there is little room for error, unlike 1 risky player out of a full roster.
 
2013-04-20 05:32:49 PM  
Incidentally, this is why baseball is not nearly what it used to be in rural America.

Of course, that's not racist enough.
 
2013-04-20 05:33:34 PM  

Tommy Moo: four or five pitchers


HAHAHAHA
 
2013-04-20 05:35:38 PM  

dywed88: Sure, they will try and make it sound like they care about a social issue, but they are really looking at their next generation of players.


And instead of looking for untapped markets across Latin and South America, amongst other places, MLB is going to try to spread an even thinner layer of butter on their bread.
 
2013-04-20 05:39:16 PM  

IAmRight: There is a significant difference between being African-American and just having black skin in America.


Given the region where many "black skinned" players that don't come from the United States come from, what would that be? That their ancestral oppressors weren't always American?
 
2013-04-20 06:41:11 PM  

Now That's What I Call a Taco!: bhcompy: IAmRight: SuperT: I guess black people from places that aren't the united states aren't black.

There is a significant difference between being African-American and just having black skin in America. Keep pretending there isn't, though.

Racists don't think "Geez, that damn African-American Brandon Phillips is Black and I hate him, so let me replace him with this African-Dominican Erick Aybar because he's not Black"

Which has absolutely fark all to do with this issue.

Pricing out poor kids is VERY VERY bad for the future health of a professional sport. You want to cast your net for young talent as wide as you possibly can. The probable #1 pick in the upcoming NBA draft, Ben McLemore, was so poor growing up in East St Louis, he battled malnourishment at times. He's far from alone.

Soccer in the US faces the same problem as baseball, which is why we continue to be way behind countries as small as Portugal when it comes to talent development.

And quit pretending that white people are just as athletic as black people. It's embarrassing.


Your last statement is absolutely ridiculous not to mention extremely racist.
 
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